Elliott Abrams

Pressure Points

Abrams gives his take on U.S. foreign policy, with special focus on the Middle East and democracy and human rights issues.

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Showing posts for "Algeria"

Bouteflika’s Last Election

by Elliott Abrams

Yesterday was election day in Algeria, and President Bouteflika of course won re-election. Unfortunately, it is almost unheard of for an Arab president to run and be defeated– one of the reasons the “Arab Spring” uprisings took place. Opponents of the regime are alleging irregularities in the election, which is of course accurate: it was anything but a level playing field. In any free society, with open multi-party political competition, a very sick 77-year-old would not be running for and winning re-election. Read more »

Algeria, Young and Old

by Elliott Abrams

The median age of the Algerian population is 27 years, and 46 percent of the population is under the age of 24. But its president, Abdelaziz Bouteflika, is 76 years old, and is now set to take another five-year term that will have him in office at age 80. And Mr. Bouteflika is already suffering from poor health that has led him to spend months on end in France for medical treatment. Read more »

Is Algeria the Next Crisis?

by Elliott Abrams
Libya's leader Muammar Gaddafi (L) talks to Algeria's President Abdelaziz Bouteflika during celebrations of the 40th anniversary of Gaddafi coming to power, at the Green Square in Tripoli September 1, 2009. (Courtesy REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra) Libya's leader Muammar Gaddafi (L) talks to Algeria's President Abdelaziz Bouteflika during celebrations of the 40th anniversary of Gaddafi coming to power, at the Green Square in Tripoli September 1, 2009. (Courtesy REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra)

As the “Arab Spring” swept the fake republics of North Africa–Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt–Algeria seemed immune. Media reports dwelled on its stability (see this 2011 BBC and this 2012 Deutsche Welle story). Read more »

The Company You Keep

by Elliott Abrams

Nations, like individuals, are judged in part by the company they keep: their alliances and close relationships, and the governments they support. And that old adage is creating real trouble for the ayatollahs in Tehran.

As an informative Wall Street Journal article reminds us, Iran has been on the wrong side in the Arab Spring—nowhere more than in Syria: Read more »