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A Time for Daffodils—But No Taxes, Please » Japan’s Empress Michiko (top R) talks with evacuees as she visit an evacuation shelter in Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture, April 27, 2011. Japanese Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko met and chatted with survivors of last month’s massive earthquake and tsunami on Wednesday, offering comfort and solace in a role that has helped keep the country’s ancient monarchy relevant in modern times.

Japan's Empress Michiko (top R) talks with evacuees as she visit an evacuation shelter in Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture, April 27, 2011. Japanese Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko met and chatted with survivors of last month's massive earthquake and tsunami on Wednesday, offering comfort and solace in a role that has helped keep the country's ancient monarchy relevant in modern times.
20110427.EmpressMichiko.jpg

Japan’s Empress Michiko (top R) talks with evacuees as she visit an evacuation shelter in Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture, April 27, 2011. Japanese Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko met and chatted with survivors of last month’s massive earthquake and tsunami on Wednesday, offering comfort and solace in a role that has helped keep the country’s ancient monarchy relevant in modern times. Other royals round the globe may be heading off for Friday’s wedding of Britain’s Prince William and Kate Middleton, but Japan’s imperial family has more sombre duties at the moment after the March 11 disasters left some 28,000 dead or missing, devastated the northeast region and triggered a nuclear crisis. REUTERS/Kazuhiro Nogi/Pool (JAPAN – Tags: DISASTER ROYALS SOCIETY)

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