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The U.S. Response to Thailand’s Election

by Joshua Kurlantzick
July 12, 2011

Thailand's Prime Minister-elect Yingluck Shinawatra (L) poses for photographers as she gives United States ambassador to Thailand Kristie Kenney a bouquet of flowers ahead of U.S. Independence Day celebrations in Bangkok July 5, 2011.

Thailand's Prime Minister-elect Yingluck Shinawatra (L) poses for photographers as she gives United States ambassador to Thailand Kristie Kenney a bouquet of flowers ahead of U.S. Independence Day celebrations in Bangkok July 5, 2011. (Adrees Latif/Courtesy Reuters)

As the major foreign actor in Thailand, U.S. policy toward the Kingdom remains critical, and closely watched by Thai opinion leaders. Following the 2006 coup in Thailand, for example, American policy signals that, in many ways, seemed to indicate that Washington tolerated the coup provided support for the Thai military, even though, in the long run, the coup produced only more chaos.

Now, in the wake of Thailand’s July 3 election, the United States may have a role to play again, if Thailand’s establishment is able to nullify the poll through judicial rulings or other maneuverings.

In a new piece in the New Republic, I examine U.S. policy toward Thailand’s election. You can see the piece here.

Post a Comment 1 Comment

  • Posted by Thailland back packing

    Congrats Yingluck Shinawatra,democracy will Rock again and again

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