CFR Presents

Asia Unbound

CFR experts give their take on the cutting-edge issues emerging in Asia today.

The Dog That Didn’t Bark: Why No China-Japan Hacking War Over Diaoyutai/Senkaku (Yet)?

by Adam Segal Tuesday, September 4, 2012
Activists from the Hong Kong-based Action Committee for Defending the Diaoyu Islands shout slogans and wave the Chinese flag on a vessel, which will sail to a group of disputed islands in the East China Sea, in Hong Kong October 22, 2006. The banner written in Chinese reads "Japan get out of the Diaoyu Islands". (Paul Yeung / Courtesy Reuters) Activists from the Hong Kong-based Action Committee for Defending the Diaoyu Islands shout slogans and wave the Chinese flag on a vessel, which will sail to a group of disputed islands in the East China Sea, in Hong Kong October 22, 2006. The banner written in Chinese reads "Japan get out of the Diaoyu Islands". (Paul Yeung / Courtesy Reuters)

Website defacement played a large part of the standoff between China and the Philippines over the Scarborough Shoal/Huangyan Island. From April 20 until May 18 hackers on both sides traded blows, posting messages claiming sovereignty over the disputed islands and taunting the other side. Chinese hackers attacked the websites of the Department of Budget and Management and the University of Philippines, and posted the Chinese flag on the Philippines News Agency site; Filipino hackers responded with attacks on government sites and the message: “You may continue bullying our country’s waters but we will not tolerate you from intimidating our own cyber shores.” After three Chinese surveillance ships cut the exploration cables belonging to a Vietnamese ship on May 26, Chinese and Vietnamese hackers defaced and brought down thousands of websites. Read more »

Indonesia: The Downside of Decentralization

by Joshua Kurlantzick Saturday, September 1, 2012
Activists carry an Indonesian flag in Jakarta. Activists carry an Indonesian flag in Jakarta (Stringer/Courtesy Reuters).

Over the past decade and a half, Indonesia’s democratic transition has been praised (including by me)  as one of the most impressive of any developing country in the world. The distance traveled from the chaos, and potential split-up of the country, in the late 1990s, to the relative stability and high growth of today, is truly impressive. One of the main aspects of the democratization often highlighted by both Indonesia experts and many Indonesians themselves is how the country utilized political and economic devolution to reduce the power of Jakarta, cut the legacy of Suharto’s rule, increase local participation in politics and the economy, and improve citizens’ feeling of belonging to the polity. Read more »