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China’s Economy Slows but Its Influence Rises

by Joshua Kurlantzick
August 12, 2013

A vendor counts Chinese Yuan banknotes at a market in Beijing on August 9, 2013. China's consumer inflation steadied in July although factory-gate deflation persisted for a 17th month, official data showed on Friday. (Kim Kyung Hoon/Courtesy Reuters) A vendor counts Chinese Yuan banknotes at a market in Beijing on August 9, 2013. China's consumer inflation steadied in July although factory-gate deflation persisted for a 17th month, official data showed on Friday. (Kim Kyung Hoon/Courtesy Reuters)

Although China’s economy has cooled this year, battering Chinese stock markets and creating worrying prospects for global growth, the slowdown has not necessarily undermined Beijing’s power regionally or around the globe. In a new piece for The National, I analyze the Chinese economic slowdown, the impact of the slowdown on China’s state capitalist companies, and the implications for China’s regional power. Read the whole piece here.

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  • Posted by Charles Martin

    There’s no question that China’s growth will slow significantly over the next 10 years. With its cheap capital (artificial bond market void of any competition), the bubble in its real estate market ready to burst, low wages, undervalued currency, and hoping that technological advances can save its environment from continued ecological disaster, there is simply no way to boost its consumption level — where Beijing demands growth in, the household segment, to expand its GDP. The real problems that are surfacing now are going to continue to plague its economy over the next 10 years, as it did to Japan in the 1980s, clearly have a full death grip on it from: continuing to printing money, massive price spikes and hyper-inflation.

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