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Showing posts for "Adam Segal"

What Briefing Chinese Officials on Cyber Really Accomplishes

by Adam Segal
U.S. President Barack Obama, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and China's President Xi Jinping talk during a family photo at the Nuclear Security Summit in The Hague March 25, 2014. (Doug Mills/Courtesy Reuters) U.S. President Barack Obama, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and China's President Xi Jinping talk during a family photo at the Nuclear Security Summit in The Hague March 25, 2014. (Doug Mills/Courtesy Reuters)

David Sanger wrote an interesting article in the New York Times about Washington’s efforts to prevent escalating cyberattacks with Beijing. According to Sanger, U.S. officials have tried to allay the concerns of their Chinese counterparts about the buildup of Pentagon capabilities through greater transparency. They have briefed them on the “emerging doctrine for defending against cyberattacks against the United States—and for using its cybertechnology against adversaries, including the Chinese.” We should, however, be clear about their real purpose. These briefings have more to do with deterring China than assuring it. Read more »

China’s New Small Leading Group on Cybersecurity and Internet Management

by Adam Segal
China's Politburo Standing Committee member Liu Yunshan (R ) and China's Vice Premier Li Keqiang attend the opening ceremony of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 3, 2013. (Jason Lee/Courtesy Reuters) China's Politburo Standing Committee member Liu Yunshan (R ) and China's Vice Premier Li Keqiang attend the opening ceremony of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 3, 2013. (Jason Lee/Courtesy Reuters)

China announced the first meeting of a leading group on Internet security and informatization earlier today. The group is chaired by President Xi Jinping, while Premier Li Keqiang and Liu Yunshan, a member of the Standing Committee of the Political Bureau and the director of the Propaganda Department, serve as the group’s deputies. There have been reports of a leading small group on cyber issues meeting in the past, but this is the first public meeting in at least four years. The announcement of this new group is significant. Read more »

Chinese Predictions for Cyberspace in 2014: Intense Competition and National Conflict

by Adam Segal
An officer of the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) uses a string to ensure that the soldiers making up a guard of honour, stand in a straight line before an official welcoming ceremony for Afghan President Hamid Karzai outside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on September 27, 2013. (Kim Kyung-Hoon/Courtesy Reuters) An officer of the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) uses a string to ensure that the soldiers making up a guard of honour, stand in a straight line before an official welcoming ceremony for Afghan President Hamid Karzai outside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on September 27, 2013. (Kim Kyung-Hoon/Courtesy Reuters)

The U.S.-China cybersecurity working group recently met for the second time during the first week in December. There have been no public reports of what was discussed or what progress, if any, was made. As with many of these dialogues, one of the main goals is not concrete deliverables, but reducing mistrust between the two sides. Yet some recent articles suggest that mutual understanding is going to be hard to find, and that some in China see cyberspace as increasingly antagonistic and dangerous. Read more »

Cyberspace Cannot Live Without Sovereignty, Says Lu Wei

by Adam Segal
Demonstrators from the pro-China "Caring Hong Kong Power" group protest over claims from former U.S. spy agency contractor Edward Snowden that the National Security Agency (NSA) hacked computers in the Chinese territory, outside the U.S. Consulate in Hong Kong on July 9, 2013. (Bobby Yip/Courtesy Reuters) Demonstrators from the pro-China "Caring Hong Kong Power" group protest over claims from former U.S. spy agency contractor Edward Snowden that the National Security Agency (NSA) hacked computers in the Chinese territory, outside the U.S. Consulate in Hong Kong on July 9, 2013. (Bobby Yip/Courtesy Reuters)

Last week at a meeting which spent most of its time focusing on how U.S. cyberspace policy could recover in the wake of the Snowden revelations, the panel was asked whether there was any good news to report. I mentioned, with what I thought was some hedging, the June 2013 report from the third UN Group of Government Experts (GGE) on Developments in the Field of Information and Telecommunications in the Context of International Security . Read more »

Japan Moves Forward in Cyberspace

by Adam Segal
A Diet guard stands guards in front of the parliament building in Tokyo on December 26, 2012. (Yuriko Nakao/Courtesy Reuters) A Diet guard stands guards in front of the parliament building in Tokyo on December 26, 2012. (Yuriko Nakao/Courtesy Reuters)

As Rob Sheldon and Mihoko Matsubara have noted in previous guest posts, there has been a great deal of cybersecurity policy activity in Japan over the last year, both on the domestic and international fronts. In June 2013, Japan’s Information Security Policy Council released a new cybersecurity strategy. In October, the United States and Japan announced a new Cyber Defense Policy Working Group, and in the same month Japan released its first International Strategy on Cybersecurity. Read more »

Oil Security, China, and Taiwan

by Adam Segal
A soldier stands guard next to a Z-9WZ military helicopter designed and manufactured by China during a media visit at the military base of Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) Army Aviation 4th Helicopter Regiment, on the outskirts of Beijing, July 24, 2012. (Jason Lee/Courtesy Reuters) A soldier stands guard next to a Z-9WZ military helicopter designed and manufactured by China during a media visit at the military base of Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) Army Aviation 4th Helicopter Regiment, on the outskirts of Beijing, July 24, 2012. (Jason Lee/Courtesy Reuters)

The news last week that China has passed the United States as the world’s largest net oil importer points to a number of significant geopolitical shifts that have been long in the making, including China’s increased diplomatic presence in the Middle East and its efforts to develop overland pipelines to energy sources in Central Asia. This transformation is also forcing us to rethink how an actual military conflict may unfold in East Asia, highlighting new vulnerabilities and strategies. Read more »

Will the NSA Revelations Kickstart the Domestic Cybersecurity Industry in China?

by Adam Segal
Dilma Rousseff, President of Brazil, delivers a speech at the Brazil Infrastructure Opportunity event in New York, September 25, 2013. Rousseff is in New York for the United Nations General Assembly. (Chip East/Courtesy Reuters) Dilma Rousseff, President of Brazil, delivers a speech at the Brazil Infrastructure Opportunity event in New York, September 25, 2013. Rousseff is in New York for the United Nations General Assembly. (Chip East/Courtesy Reuters)

One of the common arguments in the wake of the Snowden revelations about NSA surveillance is that other countries are going to double down on developing their own technology industries to reduce their dependence on U.S. companies. The Chinese press has made this argument numerous times–highlighting how IBM, Cisco, Intel and others have penetrated Chinese society–and this was one of the themes in Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff’s address to the United Nations General Assembly: “Brazil will redouble its efforts to adopt legislation, technologies and mechanisms to protect us from the illegal interception of communications and data.” Read more »

Lynx, Mukden, Mooncakes, and Chinese Hackers

by Adam Segal
Freshly-baked mooncakes pass along a conveyor belt at a mooncakes factory in Shanghai on September 12, 2013. (Aly Song/Courtesy Reuters) Freshly-baked mooncakes pass along a conveyor belt at a mooncakes factory in Shanghai on September 12, 2013. (Aly Song/Courtesy Reuters)

After a summer dominated by revelations of U.S. espionage and offensive cyber operations, Chinese hackers are back in the news. Three stories do a good job of illustrating that Chinese hackers are not a monolithic group, but rather multiple actors with manifold motivations. Read more »

The Positive That Might Have Come Out the U.S.-China Cybersecurity Working Group

by Adam Segal
(L-R) Chinese State Councilor Yang Jiechi, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, Chinese Vice Premier Wang Yang and U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew leave after the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue (S&ED) Joint Opening Session at the State Department in Washington on July 10, 2013. (Courtesy Yuri Gripas/Reuters) (L-R) Chinese State Councilor Yang Jiechi, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, Chinese Vice Premier Wang Yang and U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew leave after the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue (S&ED) Joint Opening Session at the State Department in Washington on July 10, 2013. (Courtesy Yuri Gripas/Reuters)

The first meeting of the U.S.-China Working Group on cybersecurity has ended, and preliminary reviews are fairly positive. Xinhua reports that “the two sides held candid in-depth discussions” and that Washington and Beijing have signaled their intention to improve cooperation in cyberspace. A senior U.S. government official rolled out the old chestnut of “constructive discussions,” but also noted that both sides made “practical proposals to increase our cooperation and build greater understanding and transparency.”

The United States raised the issue of “cyber-enabled” espionage during the working group, and cyber espionage is on the agenda during the high-level meetings of the Strategic and Economic Dialogue. Read more »

Defending an Open, Global Internet: China Is Not the Only Challenge, But Is a Big One

by Adam Segal
Task Force Report: Defending an Open, Global, Secure, and Resilient Internet Task Force Report: Defending an Open, Global, Secure, and Resilient Internet

Yesterday the Council on Foreign Relations released a new Task Force Report, “Defending an Open, Global, Secure, and Resilient Internet.” The report, co-chaired by Ambassador John Negroponte, former U.S. director of national intelligence and deputy secretary of state, and Samuel J. Palmisano, former chairman of the board and chief executive officer of IBM, and directed by me, suggests a policy framework based on four pillars. Read more »