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Asia Unbound

CFR experts give their take on the cutting-edge issues emerging in Asia today.

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Showing posts for "Economics"

Anies’s Big Win, India’s Sex Ratio, USS Carl Vinson Bluff, and More

by Guest Blogger for Elizabeth C. Economy
Anti-Ahok-Jakarta Supporters of Jakarta governor candidate Anies Baswedan react as Baswedan leads the count at the Petamburan flat polling station in Jakarta, Indonesia, on April 19, 2017. (Beawiharta/Reuters)

Rachel Brown, Sherry Cho, Larry Hong, Gabriella Meltzer, and Gabriel Walker look at five stories from Asia this week.

1. Anies elected Jakarta’s next governor. Anies Baswedan, Indonesia’s former education minister, beat out sitting governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama (better known as Ahok) in a closely contested election. While official results have not yet been released, Anies clearly leads in polls. Read more »

Japanese Offense, Tencent Meets Tesla, North Korean Hackers, and More

by Guest Blogger for Elizabeth C. Economy
Japan-SDF A Japanese Self-Defense Forces (SDF) official is silhouetted during an air show at the annual SDF ceremony at Asaka Base, Japan, on October 23, 2016. (Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters)

Rachel Brown, Sherry Cho, Lorand Laskai, and Gabriel Walker look at five stories from Asia this week.

1. LDP eyes offensive push for Japan. A policy research group in Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) is pushing for the adoption of new long-range offensive capabilities. Consisting primarily of former defense ministers, former deputy defense ministers, and former parliamentary vice ministers, the LDP group urged the government to begin considering a change to Japan’s military stance, citing a “new level of threat” from North Korea. Read more »

Trump’s Attack on H-1B Visas: A Boon for Asia?

by Guest Blogger for Elizabeth C. Economy
China's Premier Li Keqiang waves as he leaves an office of software services company Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) in Mumbai May 21, 2013. Li is in India on a three-day state visit. REUTERS/Vivek Prakash (INDIA - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) China's Premier Li Keqiang waves as he leaves an office of software services company Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) in Mumbai, India on May 21, 2013. New opportunities for collaboration between India and China in the IT and outsourcing sectors may be emerging. (Vivek Prakash/Reuters)

Rachel Brown is a research associate for Asia Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. This is the third part of a series on migration trends in India and China.

India’s outsourcing and IT sectors are on edge. The combination of recent congressional proposals to alter the H-1B visa program, President Donald J. Trump’s vitriolic statements, and his draft executive order on visa reform looms large for heavily visa-reliant companies.  Read more »

When the United States Abdicates the Throne, Who Will Lead?

by Elizabeth C. Economy
U.S. President Donald Trump gives a thumbs-up to reporters as he waits to speak by phone with the Saudi Arabia's King Salman in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst U.S. President Donald Trump gives a thumbs-up to reporters as he waits to speak by phone with Saudi Arabia's King Salman in the Oval Office on January 29, 2017. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

President Donald J. Trump’s initial forays into foreign policy suggest a desire to abdicate the throne. Not his own position as president of course, but rather the United States’ position as the world’s preeminent power—both as a driver of a globalized world and a defender of the traditional liberal order. He has withdrawn the United States from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the Asia-Pacific trade pact that would have cemented U.S. leadership among the economies that make up 40 percent of the world’s GDP. Read more »

Trump and Chinese Investment, Pakistan’s Missiles, Indian Lychee Illness, and More

by Guest Blogger for Elizabeth C. Economy
Trump-Ma U.S. President Donald J. Trump and Alibaba Executive Chairman Jack Ma speak with members of the news media after their meeting at Trump Tower in New York City, January 9, 2017. (Mike Segar/Reuters)

Rachel Brown, Sherry Cho, Lorand Laskai, Gabriella Meltzer, and Gabriel Walker look at five stories from Asia this week.

1. Trump doesn’t like China, but does he like Chinese money? President Donald J. Trump will soon face some important decisions on Chinese investment in the United States. Trump will need to decide whether to approve a plan by Alibaba’s Paypal-like subsidiary Ant Financial to buy U.S. payment processor MoneyGram, or block the acquisition on national-security grounds. Read more »

The World Economy is Already Responding to the Presidential Transition

by Joshua Kurlantzick
trump-2 U.S. President-Elect Donald J. Trump speaks at the USA Thank You Tour event at the Wisconsin State Fair Exposition Center in West Allis, Wisconsin, U.S., on December 13, 2016. (Shannon Stapleton/Reuters)

As the Trump administration steps up its transition planning, the details of its proposed economic policies remain unclear. During the campaign, Trump took multiple positions that were at odds with Republican orthodoxy on economics, slamming current and potential U.S. free trade deals, calling for possible tariffs on China, Mexico, and other countries, and vowing to unleash a wave of spending in America that could, he argued, bolster infrastructure and revive withering manufacturing industries. Read more »

Tillerson and the South China Sea, Cashless in India, and More

by Guest Blogger for Elizabeth C. Economy
rex-tillerson-cnooc Rex Tillerson (R), chairman and chief executive officer of ExxonMobil shakes hands with China National Offshore Oil Corp. Chairman Fu Chengyu during the 19th World Petroleum Congress in Madrid, Spain, on July 1, 2008. (Susana Vera/Reuters)

Rachel Brown, Sherry Cho, Gabriella Meltzer, and Gabriel Walker look at five stories from Asia this week.

1. Rex Tillerson’s South China Sea ties. While Tillerson’s relationship with Russia has attracted the lion’s share of attention after his recent nomination as secretary of state by President-Elect Trump, Tillerson’s ties to disputes in the South China Sea have garnered much less attention. Read more »

Park’s Impeachment, Duterte’s Drug War in Photos, and More

by Guest Blogger for Elizabeth C. Economy
park-impeachment-protest People react after an impeachment vote on South Korean President Park Geun-hye was passed, in front of the National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea. (News1 via Reuters)

Rachel Brown, Sherry Cho, Gabriella Meltzer, David O’Connor, and Gabriel Walker look at five stories from Asia this week.

1. South Korea’s National Assembly votes to impeach Park Geun-hye. On Friday, South Korea’s 300-member National Assembly voted 234 to 56 to impeach President Park Geun-hye. The decisive vote, for which many members of Park’s own Saenuri party joined opposition and independent assembly-members in a secret ballot to vote for her impeachment, follows months of escalating scandal centered on charges of influence-peddling. Read more »

Trump’s Asia, Delhi’s Smog, Park’s New PM, and More

by Guest Blogger for Elizabeth C. Economy
A member of student activist group, League of Filipino Students, displays an image of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump as he chants anti-U.S. slogans during a rally outside the U.S. embassy in Manila, Philippines, on November 10, 2016. (Erik De Castro/Reuters)

Rachel Brown, Sherry Cho, Gabriella Meltzer, and Gabriel Walker look at five stories from Asia this week.

1. Asia braces for Trump. On Tuesday night, as results from the U.S. general election poured in from polling places across America, Asian markets reeled at the prospect of a Trump presidency. By Thursday, U.S. markets stabilized and Asian markets had bounced back. But what will a Trump in the White House mean for Asia in the coming four years? At this point, even experts’ best guesses are still uncertain. Read more »

Friday Asia Update: Five Stories From the Week of October 7, 2016

by Guest Blogger for Elizabeth C. Economy
joshua-wong-thai-expulsion Pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong shows a notice of expulsion offered by Thai immigration besides Demosisto Chairman Nathan Law (L), after Wong arrived at Hong Kong Airport in Hong Kong, October 5, 2016. (Bobby Yip/Reuters)

Rachel Brown, Lincoln Davidson, Gabriella Meltzer, David O’Connor, and Gabriel Walker look at five stories from Asia this week.

1. Thailand detains Hong Kong democracy activist. Thai authorities detained Occupy Central organizer Joshua Wong for twelve hours earlier this week and denied him entry to the country. Wong, who is nineteen, was visiting Thailand to address students in Bangkok. Following his return to Hong Kong, Wong claimed that the Thai government had detained him because it had been directed to do so by the Chinese government. Read more »