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Showing posts for "Cybersecurity"

Friday Asia Update: Top Five Stories for the Week of May 10, 2013

by Guest Blogger for Elizabeth C. Economy
Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (L) talks to China's Premier Li Keqiang during a signing ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on May 8, 2013. (Courtesy Reuters/Kim Kyung-Hoon) Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (L) talks to China's Premier Li Keqiang during a signing ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on May 8, 2013. (Kim Kyung-Hoon/Courtesy Reuters)

Sharone Tobias and Will Piekos look at the top five stories in Asia this week.

1. China offers to play peacemaker, but Bibi and Abbas don’t bite. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin “Bibi” Netanyahu and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas both visited China this week. The Chinese media enthusiastically reported on the possibility that the country could serve as neutral territory for the two leaders to negotiate a peace settlement. However, the Chinese government made sure the leaders stayed far apart throughout the trip and were never in the same city at the same time. Read more »

Three Thoughts on Cyber and the Defense Department’s Report on the Chinese Military

by Adam Segal
U.S. Joint Chiefs Chairman General Martin Dempsey (R) and Chief of the general staff of China's People's Liberation Army Fang Fenghui salute after inspecting a guard of honor during a welcoming ceremony at the Bayi Building in Beijing on April 22, 2013. (Andy Wong/Courtesy Reuters) U.S. Joint Chiefs Chairman General Martin Dempsey (R) and Chief of the general staff of China's People's Liberation Army Fang Fenghui salute after inspecting a guard of honor during a welcoming ceremony at the Bayi Building in Beijing on April 22, 2013. (Andy Wong/Courtesy Reuters)

The Defense Department released its annual report to Congress on Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic of China 2013. Besides being delivered relatively early compared to past editions and being almost twice as long as the 2012 version, this year’s version has at least three interesting points about Chinese cyber activities.

First, as many have noted, the sharpest break from the past is that the report directly ascribes blame for cyberattacks to the Chinese government and military, saying, “numerous computer systems around the world, including those owned by the U.S. government, continued to be targeted for intrusions, some of which appear to be attributable directly to the Chinese government and military.” Read more »

What To Do About Chinese Cyber Espionage?

by Adam Segal
The facade of the New York Times building is seen in New York, on November 29, 2010. The facade of the New York Times building is seen in New York, on November 29, 2010. (Shannon Stapleton/Courtesy Reuters)

A few days after the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Washington Post all admitted that their computer networks had been attacked, apparently by China-based hackers, it seems fair to say that both sides agree the “naming and shaming” approach to the problem is not working. The United States can call China out, but it has no real affect on behavior. Read more »

Presidential Inbox: The Constant Irrititant of Cybersecurity in Asia

by Adam Segal
U.S. President Barack Obama recites his oath of office as first lady Michelle Obama looks on during swearing-in ceremonies on the West front of the U.S Capitol in Washington, DC, on January 21, 2013. U.S. President Barack Obama recites his oath of office as first lady Michelle Obama looks on during swearing-in ceremonies on the West front of the U.S Capitol in Washington, DC, on January 21, 2013. (Jim Bourg/Courtesy Reuters)

Mr. President, as you look toward Asia in your second term, cybersecurity will be a grain of sand in the eye, a major irritant but not one that blocks the larger vision of what you hope to accomplish in the region. That grain, namely Chinese cyber espionage, is not going away any time soon, but there are things you can do to make it slightly less annoying. Moreover, many of the policies to mitigate the situation will overlap with other efforts to re-energize the U.S. presence and boost ties to allies and friends in the region. Read more »

Mihoko Matsubara: What the LDP Victory Means for Japan’s Cybersecurity Policy

by Guest Blogger for Adam Segal
Japan's conservative Liberal Democratic Party's (LDP) leader and next Prime Minister Shinzo Abe attends a news conference at the LDP headquarters in Tokyo December 17, 2012. Japan's conservative Liberal Democratic Party's (LDP) leader and next Prime Minister Shinzo Abe attends a news conference at the LDP headquarters in Tokyo, December 17, 2012 (Toru Hanai/Courtesy Reuters).

Mihoko Matsubara is a cybersecurity analyst and a nonresident Sasakawa Peace Foundation fellow at Pacific Forum CSIS, Honolulu, Hawaii. The views expressed here are her own. 

The Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) won a majority in the lower house election on December 16. This victory will make it easier for the next administration to reinforce cybersecurity as part of national security and improve technologies to deal with cyber attacks. Yet this will not be sufficient, and the new government must also enhance nontechnical aspects of cybersecurity policy, including international cooperation. Read more »

Five Trends to Watch for in Chinese Cybersecurity in 2013

by Adam Segal
A man smokes as he uses a computer at an internet cafe in Hefei, Anhui province, A man smokes as he uses a computer at an internet cafe in Hefei, Anhui province, (Jianan Yu/Courtesy Reuters)

With 2012 coming to an end, here are some of the larger trends to watch in Chinese cybersecurity in the upcoming year.

New institutions/bureaucratic reform. There are rumors that there will be another round of bureaucratic reforms in the spring. Chinese analysts have pointed out that one of the great weaknesses in their defenses is that institutional oversight of cybersecurity is fragmented and ineffective, and there is a low degree of information sharing between the government and industry. There have also been complaints that China lacks adequate strategic planning for information security. In the past, efforts at ministerial reform have been underwhelming, resulting in little more than shuffling around of titles. This CCID report, however, does make the interesting suggestion that China should set up an “information security agency” to better coordinate cyber strategy. Read more »

The 18th Party Congress and Chinese Cyberpower

by Adam Segal
Chinese President Hu Jintao delivers a speech during the opening ceremony of 18th National Congress of Communist Party of China at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 11, 2012. Chinese President Hu Jintao delivers a speech during the opening ceremony of 18th National Congress of Communist Party of China at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 11, 2012. (Jason Lee/Courtesy Reuters)

China will announce its new leadership slate this week and the rest of the world will start scrambling, trying to figure out what the lineup means for the prospects of economic and political reform as well as the direction of Chinese foreign policy.

It is hard to know what, if any, impact the political succession will have on Chinese cyberspace policy. Read more »

On Cybersecurity, India Begins to Embrace the Private Sector

by Guest Blogger for Adam Segal
India's National Security Advisor, Shri Shivshankar Menon, delivering the keynote address at the release of the report of the Joint Working Group (JWG) on “Engagement with Private Sector on Cyber Security”, in New Delhi on October 15, 2012. (Courtesy Government of India) India's National Security Advisor, Shri Shivshankar Menon, delivering the keynote address at the release of the report of the Joint Working Group (JWG) on “Engagement with Private Sector on Cyber Security”, in New Delhi on October 15, 2012. (Courtesy Government of India)

Cherian Samuel is an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses in Delhi, India.

Monday, October 15 saw the release of the Government of India’s Recommendations of the Joint Working Group on Cyber Security. The Joint Working Group was created in July 2012 and included representatives from various ministries as well as the private sector, namely the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry, The National Association of Software and Services Companies, the Data Security Council of India and the Confederation of Indian Industry. The entire exercise was coordinated by the National Security Council Secretariat. Read more »

Huawei, Cybersecurity, and U.S. Foreign Policy

by Adam Segal
Reps. Mike Rogers and Dutch Ruppersberger hold a news conference on Huawei and ZTE in Washington House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers (R-MI) (L) and Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD) hold a news conference to release a report on "national security threats posed by Chinese telecommunications companies Huawei and ZTE" on Capitol Hill in Washington October 8, 2012. (Yuri Gripas/Courtesy Reuters)

Most of the attention generated by the report by Chairman Mike Rogers and Ranking Member C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger of the House Select Committee on Intelligence (HSCI) has focused on the issues of trade, trust, and Huawei’s and ZTE’s future access to the U.S. market. The report, however, should also be seen as another step in the effort to construct a coherent foreign policy response to cyber espionage.

The domestic agenda has revolved around three debates: the government’s role in setting security standards for the private sector; how the government and private sector should share threat information; and the respective roles of DHS and NSA in defending the private sector. Read more »

China, International Law, and Cyberspace

by Adam Segal
Harold Hongju Koh, Legal Advisor, U.S. Department of State, speaking at a press conference at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations in Geneva. (Eric Bridiers/Courtesy U.S. Mission to the UN) Harold Hongju Koh, Legal Advisor, U.S. Department of State, speaking at a press conference at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations in Geneva. (Eric Bridiers/Courtesy U.S. Mission to the UN)

In a speech two weeks ago, Harold Koh stated that the United States government believes that cyberattacks can amount to armed attacks and are subject to international law. “International law principles do apply in cyberspace,” said Koh. “Cyber activities that proximately result in death, injury, or significant destruction would likely be viewed as a use of force.” Self-defense, proportionality, neutrality, and distinction should all apply in cyberspace, though there remain questions and ambiguities about defining the use of force, distinguishing between military and civilian-use networks, and the continuing problem of attribution. Read more »