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Transition 2012

A guide to foreign policy and the 2012 U.S. presidential transition.

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Overnight Roundup: Santorum Traces 100-Day Economic Plan

by Newsteam Staff
February 28, 2012

Photo of the Day: The first two Indian-American governors, South Carolina's Nikki Haley and Louisiana's Bobby Jindal, at the White House February 27, 2012. (Kevin Lamarque/Courtesy Reuters) Photo of the Day: The first two Indian-American governors, South Carolina's Nikki Haley and Louisiana's Bobby Jindal, at the White House February 27, 2012. (Kevin Lamarque/Courtesy Reuters)

In a Wall Street Journal op-ed the day before the Michigan and Arizona primaries, GOP presidential candidate Rick Santorum outlined a “comprehensive pro-growth and pro-family” economic agenda that he said he would work with Congress to pass in the first 100 days of his administration. His plan calls for only two income tax rates of 10 percent and 28 percent, along with a corporate tax rate of 17.5 percent. He also said he would approve the Keystone XL Pipeline, cut spending by $5 trillion over five years, and submit five free trade agreements during his first year in office to increase exports.

In remarks to the National Governors Association Monday, President Obama urged states to prioritize education. “No issue will have a bigger impact on the future performance of our economy than education,” he said, adding that it would determine whether some companies continued to do business in the United States. Greater attention has been placed on education as a major economic issue as workers vie for jobs in a tough job market and businesses look to remain competitive abroad.

A Gallup poll released Wednesday found that Democrats and Republicans are sharply divided over whether to repeal President Obama’s 2010 health care law, with 87 percent of Republicans favoring repeal and 77 percent of Democrats opposing it. All four GOP candidates–Santorum, Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich, and Ron Paul–oppose the law and criticized it at a presidential debate January 26. Some analysts say an increasing number of U.S. businesses are less competitive globally because of ballooning healthcare costs. U.S. economic woes have heightened the burden of healthcare costs both on individuals and businesses. But whether the new law lowers or raises costs for companies remains hotly debated.

–Liriel Higa, Contributing Editor

1 Comment

  • Posted by Helen

    something like, Frankly, we’ve got plenty to do aurnod here without having to repeatedly defend a law arising from a wedge issue trotted out to score political points and prevent a problem that only exists in the minds of some prejudiced people. I’d like to think Obama is on a boldness kick and has rediscovered where his support lies, but I don’t. He’s been a no show in the battle going on in Wisconsin, disgustingly so. His SOTU and budget both serve to validate Republicans’ politically self-serving talking points about the need to cut spending, even though doing so will only stall or reverse economic recovery — ironically, postponing the day when the economy is finally back in shape and some serious deficit reduction can take place without spiking unemployment and chilling demand.Oh yes, Obama is a far better president than the one he replaced. But this period we’re in calls for a Roosevelt, Truman or Johnson-type fighter and reformer, not an appeaser. The fact Obama either doesn’t understand that or does but chooses to ignore it leaves him as a muddler who’s blowing more opportunities to make a difference, to set things right, than most presidents ever get.