The Candidates and The World

Transition 2012

A guide to foreign policy and the 2012 U.S. presidential transition.

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Overnight Roundup: Santorum, Romney Take on Foreign Policy

by Newsteam Staff
March 30, 2012

Photo of the Day: Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, President George H.W. Bush, and former first lady Barbara Bush in Houston March 29, 2012. (Donna Carson/Courtesy Reuters) Photo of the Day: Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, President George H.W. Bush, and former first lady Barbara Bush in Houston March 29, 2012. (Donna Carson/Courtesy Reuters)

In what was billed as a major foreign policy address (AP) Thursday, Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum criticized the Obama administration, saying it has been too slow to address Iran’s nuclear threat, has ignored its ally Israel, and rushes to engage in diplomacy with U.S. enemies. Santorum also frequently invoked the memory of President Ronald Reagan (LAT), talking about Reagan’s policy triumvirate free enterprise, strong defense, and conservative social policies. Watch the address on CSPAN.

In an op-ed Wednesday, Santorum laid out his vision for U.S. economic growth and global competition, repeating his plan to lower the corporate tax rate to 17.5 percent and focusing on a U.S. response to China.

GOP frontrunner Mitt Romney is said to be preparing to deliver a big foreign policy speech later this spring (WashPo). Romney has, thus far, been selective in his challenges (NBC) to Obama’s foreign policies, though he has come out in recent days criticizing the president’s handling of the U.S.-Russia relationship.


With constantly creeping gas prices a major concern on the campaign trail, President Barack Obama made another pitch Thursday to end oil and gas subsidies, only to see it thwarted by the Senate before days’ end.

In early March, Obama called on Congress to end $4 billion in annual tax breaks and subsidies for oil and gas companies. He renewed the call from the White House rose garden Thursday, saying the petroleum industry — which reported more than $80 billion in profits last year — will do just fine without them, but voters are hurting.

“Instead of taxpayer giveaways to an industry that’s never been more profitable, we should be using that money to double-down on investments in clean energy technologies that have never been more promising — investments in wind power and solar power and biofuels; investments in fuel-efficient cars and trucks, and energy-efficient homes and buildings,” Obama said. “That’s the future.  That’s the only way we’re going to break this cycle of high gas prices that happen year after year after year.”

But the 51-47 Senate procedural vote — with four Democrats siding with Republicans — was not enough (RCP) to invoke cloture and move on to pass the repeal. Sixty votes were needed to move on from debate a vote on the actual bill.

– Gayle S. Putrich, Contributing Editor

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