The Candidates and The World

Transition 2012

A guide to foreign policy and the 2012 U.S. presidential transition.

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Midday Update: Mixed Message on Swing-State Economies

by Newsteam Staff
May 29, 2012

Photo of the Day: Mitt Romney supporters wave American flags during a Memorial Day ceremony held at the Veterans Museum & Memorial Center in San Diego, California May 28, 2012 (Denis Poroy/Courtesy Reuters). Photo of the Day: Mitt Romney supporters wave American flags during a Memorial Day ceremony held at the Veterans Museum & Memorial Center in San Diego, California May 28, 2012 (Denis Poroy/Courtesy Reuters).

GOP presidential hopeful Mitt Romney is attempting to campaign in Ohio and other swing states (TIME) on a bad economy, which he would like to blame on President Barack Obama. This line, however, puts in him at odds with the Republican governors who seem to be echoing Obama’s message of slow-but-promising progress.

Republican governors in Ohio, Nevada, Michigan, Florida, and Virginia are giving Obama “unlikely support” with their stories of falling unemployment numbers and increasing optimism, writes Michael Crowley.

“Not that these governors are affording Obama any credit. They say their states could be doing even better under a Republican president,” he says. “But the more they feel compelled, for reasons of political self-interest, to echo the White House’s tale of  economic progress, the less likely they are to get one.”


While members of the military traditionally vote for Republicans, Obama is leading Romney in contributions from military personnel, according to a USA Today report on campaign finance filings. Obama has a more than five-to-one edge over Romney in political donations from individuals who list themselves as employees of the Defense Department or one of four military branches.

Still according to a new Gallup poll, U.S. veterans support Romney over Obama for president by 58 percent to 34 percent, while non-veterans give Obama a four-percentage-point edge.

“In a population that is currently evenly split in its preferences for Barack Obama or Mitt Romney for president, veterans stand out for their 24-point preference for Romney,” the pollster says. “About a fourth of men are veterans, and it is their strong skew toward Romney that essentially creates the GOP candidate’s leading position among men today.”


Foreign Policy‘s Daniel Drezner predicts the first year of foreign policy under President Romney, based on every single foreign policy statement or comment the candidate has made on the campaign trail so far.


Romney is expected to clinch the Republican nomination in today’s Texas primary, surpassing the 1,144 delegate mark (CBS) and is expected to step up his central campaign message on jobs and the economy.

In a press release sent out today, the Romney campaign argued that President Obama has taken “unprecedented actions to hinder job creators.

In an interview this morning on Fox, Romney said, “I can make the economy better. I can get more jobs in America. I can get competition between employers for jobs, rising wages. I understand how the economy works.”

– Gayle S. Putrich, Contributing Editor

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