The Candidates and The World

Transition 2012

A guide to foreign policy and the 2012 U.S. presidential transition.

Print Print Email Email Share Share Cite Cite
Style: MLA APA Chicago Close

loading...

Midday Update: Obama Turns Attention to G20

by Newsteam Staff
June 18, 2012

Photo of the Day: Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks to a crowd outside K's Hamburger Shop in Troy, Ohio, June 17, 2012 (Larry Downing/Courtesy Reuters). Photo of the Day: Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks to a crowd outside K's Hamburger Shop in Troy, Ohio, June 17, 2012 (Larry Downing/Courtesy Reuters).

President Barack Obama took time out from the campaign trail to attend the G20 summit in Mexico (WSJ), hoping to persuade the European Union to resolve its crisis before it further weakens the U.S. recovery and his reelection prospects.

Though the financial crisis is Europe’s problem to solve and the role of any U.S. president is limited, sweeping problems in the eurozone continue to be a significant threat to the U.S. economy — the main concern for voters in the November election.

Obama also hopes to pressure Russia at the summit to help curtail violence in Syria. An unraveling relationship with Russia and dealing with the violence in Syria have also been a campaign concern.


House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) made his first public appearance with presumptive GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney of the campaign Sunday, touting Romney’s ability to put “the economy back together again” (ABC).

Boehner also touted his own business acumen as well as that of Romney and potential vice presidential contender Sen. Rob Portman (Politico), another Ohio Republican who also was the U.S. Trade Representative for the last Bush administration.


President Obama’s major policy shift last week last week to stop deportations of young illegal immigrants was driven in part by pressure from the left that the president was losing the initiative to Republicans and alienating the Latino voters who may be pivotal to his re-election bid, says an article in  the New York Times.

The latest Gallup poll shows the policy change also comes at a time when U.S. voters’ views toward immigration are significantly more positive than they have been in recent years.

Of those polled, 66 percent said immigration is a “good thing” for the United States today, up from 59 percent last year and one percentage point off the 2006 high of 67 percent. The poll was conducted June 7 through 10, days before President Obama announced the policy change.

Though Gallup says their polling shows immigration ranks among the least important issues to voters in the 2012 presidential election,  pollsters also say between the deportation policy change and the upcoming Supreme Court ruling on Arizona’s immigration law, immigration could become a greater concern to voters as November draws nearer.

– Gayle S. Putrich, Contributing Editor

Comments are closed.