The Candidates and The World

Transition 2012

A guide to foreign policy and the 2012 U.S. presidential transition.

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Midday Update: Romney Wraps up Trip With Warsaw Speech

by Newsteam Staff
July 31, 2012

Photo of the Day: Republican Presidential candidate Mitt Romney and his wife Ann (R) visit the Warsaw Uprising Memorial in Warsaw, July 31, 2012 (Jason Reed/Courtesy Reuters). Photo of the Day: Republican Presidential candidate Mitt Romney and his wife Ann (R) visit the Warsaw Uprising Memorial in Warsaw, July 31, 2012 (Jason Reed/Courtesy Reuters).

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney wrapped up his trip abroad Tuesday with a speech in Warsaw heralding the Polish economy as a model for the world.

“The world should pay close attention to the transformation of Poland’s economy,” Romney said. “A march toward economic liberty and smaller government has meant a march toward higher living standards, a strong military that defends liberty at home and abroad, and an important and growing role on the international stage.”

Romney also lauded Poland’s transition from communism to democracy as an example for the rest of the world while saying Russia had faltered on the path to freedom (Reuters).


Speaking at a New York City campaign fundraiser, President Barack Obama again urged Europe’s leaders to take swift and decisive action to rescue their economy (Politico).

“I don’t think ultimately that the Europeans will let the euro unravel,” he said. “But they’re going to have to take some decisive steps. ”

And if the United States can help the Europeans pull their economy back from the brink of financial disaster, President Obama said, it will also help bolster the U.S. position in the world. “If we can stabilize Europe, position ourselves on education, on science and technology, on energy, and a few other pieces of unfinished business like comprehensive immigration reform, then there’s no reason why America should not thrive in the decades to come,” Obama said.


The Romney campaign attempted to keep the focus on the U.S. economy and jobs with surrogates hammering Romney’s pro-business message, but the effort was overshadowed by more controversy over remarks made while abroad by Romney that upset Palestinians (Reuters).

Romney’s campaign sent teams of high-profile supporters — including former rivals for the GOP’s presidential nomination Newt Gingrich and Tim Pawlenty — to eighteen events in a dozen swing states to hammer home its message that Obama is an anti-business lover of big government.

But the spotlight remained on Romney’s comments at a Jerusalem fundraiser that that differences in culture powered Israel’s economic success compared with the Palestinians. The statement angered Palestinian leaders, who said economic troubles are rooted in the Israeli restrictions imposed on them, of which the candidate appeared ignorant.

– Gayle S. Putrich, Contributing Editor

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