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Transition 2012

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Midday Update: Obama Touts Education’s Economic Role

by Newsteam Staff
August 21, 2012

Photo of the Day: Supporters wait for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney and vice-presidential candidate, Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI), in Manchester, New Hampshire August 20, 2012 (Brian Snyder/Courtesy Reuters). Photo of the Day: Supporters wait for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney in Manchester, New Hampshire August 20, 2012 (Brian Snyder/Courtesy Reuters).

President Barack Obama is expected use a two-day campaign trip to Ohio and Nevada to outline his differences with Mitt Romney on education and its role in U.S. competitiveness (WSJ).

Democratic officials call education “one of the most important economic issues facing our nation,” (LAT) and this week, President Obama will tout the steps his administration has taken to bolster education as part of his effort to grow the middle class, including easing the college loan burden for students.

The Obama campaign is also drawing attention to the difference between the president’s efforts and the education spending plans of GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s running mate, Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI), which would cut federal spending on education in an effort to reduce the deficit.


Vice presidential candidate Ryan talked about foreign policy issues (NYT) at a Monday town hall in New Hampshire, answering questions about Israel, the threat of an Iranian nuclear weapon, and the Afghanistan war.

In addition to criticizing current U.S. plans for Afghanistan withdrawal, Ryan  said Obama’s support for using the 1967 borders as a baseline for a two-state solution undercut Israel and that was seriously concerned about Iran’s nuclear program.

“We have to recognize that perhaps the greatest threat in the world today is an Iran with nuclear capability, nuclear weapons capability,” Ryan said, calling it “an existential threat to Israel’’ (ABC) as well as U.S. national security.’


At Foreign Policy, Lawrence J. Korb,Robert Ward, and Max Hoffman of the Center for American Progress write that GOP vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan’s defense plans are closer to those of President Barack Obama than his running mate’s.

– Gayle S. Putrich, Contributing Editor

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