The Candidates and The World

Transition 2012

A guide to foreign policy and the 2012 U.S. presidential transition.

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Midday Update: Romney Lays Out Economic Recovery Plan

by Newsteam Staff
August 27, 2012

Photo of the Day: Workers carry a Romney Ryan 2012 sign on the floor at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida, August 26, 2012 (Mike Segar/Courtesy Reuters). Photo of the Day: Workers carry a Romney Ryan 2012 sign on the floor at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida, August 26, 2012 (Mike Segar/Courtesy Reuters).

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney outlined his plans governing for Politico’s Jim Vandehei and Mike Allen, including his plans to run his administration more like a business and address the sluggish economy.

“Romney pledged to bring corporate order to the West Wing. He promised to issue a checklist for his first 100 days, similar to the printed scorecard he used in Massachusetts; treat his Cabinet like a board of directors; and try to restart the economy using the hands-on management style that made him hundreds of millions of dollars,” they write.


With a hurricane threatening the Gulf Coast, the Republican National Committee shifted its convention schedule in Tampa, canceling Monday’s planned activities and switching to a three-day schedule (ABC) that includes voting on Romney’s nomination on Tuesday (NYT).

You can read the revised GOP convention schedule here.


Reuters’ Matt Spetalnick examines what foreign policy would look like if President Barack Obama is reelected.

“There is little doubt that Obama, if re-elected, would have greater freedom to make more of a mark abroad as he looks to his legacy. Bill Clinton and Ronald Reagan did so in second terms -Reagan with dramatic disarmament initiatives, Clinton with a high-stakes Middle East peace push that ultimately failed,” writes Spetalnick.

He says a second Obama administration is likely to be focused on closing out the war in Afghanistan, but could also include broadening the fight against al-Qaeda; re-prioritizing relationships in Asia; taking a tougher stance with China on trade practices; and furthering nuclear arms talks with Russia.


Foreign Policy’s Uri Friedman examines ten possible foreign policy flashpoints in the Republican Party platform ahead of the convention, from defense spending to immigration policy to relations with Cuba.


In case you missed it, CFR’s Michael Levi wrote in Foreign Policy last week that Romney’s plan for U.S. energy independence–which relies in part on increased domestic oil and gas production–may not be the answer for cutting back on foreign oil consumption.

“The biggest problem with the plan, though, is not what it does or promises — it’s what it leaves out,” he said. “The United States remains vulnerable to global oil markets and constrained in its foreign policy because of its massive consumption of oil from all sources. Yet the Romney energy strategy does nothing to address this Achilles heel aside from promising to continue support for basic research.”

– Gayle S. Putrich, Contributing Editor

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