The Candidates and The World

Transition 2012

A guide to foreign policy and the 2012 U.S. presidential transition.

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Midday Update: Campaigns Pause for 9/11 Rememberance

by Newsteam Staff
September 11, 2012

Photo of the Day: U.S. President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama observe a moment of silence on the 11th anniversary of the September 11 attacks, on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, September 11, 2012 (Jason Reed/Courtesy Reuters). Photo of the Day: U.S. President Barack Obama and wife Michelle observe the anniversary of the September 11 attacks at the White House, September 11, 2012 (Jason Reed/Courtesy Reuters).

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joseph Biden will be off the campaign trail today to commemorate the eleventh anniversary of the September 11 attacks (Politico). GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney and his running mate Paul Ryan issued statements about the anniversary. Political ads will also pause today (FoxNews).

This CFR Issue Tracker looks at both candidates’ stances on homeland and national security.


Romney returned to his warnings against Russia as a top U.S. geopolitical adversary (LAT) Monday, citing Russian opposition to U.S. action against Iran’s nuclear ambitions and the Assad regime in Syria.

“Russia is a geopolitical adversary, meaning that almost everything we try to do globally they try and oppose,” he said in a radio interview, the L.A. Times reports. “My own view is that Russia has a very different agenda than ours and that we ought to recognize that, and that we should pursue our interests, but recognize Russia as having a different course.”

This CFR Issue Tracker looks at both candidates’ stances on U.S.-Russia relations.


Warning of looming defense cuts, Romney told Ohio voters Monday that sequestration could be devastating (WashTimes) for national security and mean the loss of “thousands and thousands and hundreds of thousands of jobs across this country,” the GOP candidate said. Romney also called on President Obama to release the specifics of the coming cuts to both defense and domestic programs.

“Earlier this year, Congress passed and Mr. Obama signed legislation that requires him to lay out where the cuts will come, which Republican leaders hoped would highlight just where those communities are,” writes the Washington Times’ Seth McLaughlin. “The deadline for that report has passed, but White House spokesman Jay Carney said Monday that the report will be sent over by ‘the end of the week’.”

This CFR Issue Tracker looks at both candidates’ stances on defense policy.


Foreign Policy‘s Daniel Drezner writes that while international issues have not been much of a factor in the 2012 election, Romney’s foreign policy platform could cost him the election because it is not resonating with independent and undecided voters.

– Gayle S. Putrich, Contributing Editor

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