The Candidates and The World

Transition 2012

A guide to foreign policy and the 2012 U.S. presidential transition.

Print Print Email Email Share Share Cite Cite
Style: MLA APA Chicago Close

loading...

Midday Update: Obama Says Budget Grand Bargain Possible

by Newsteam Staff
October 25, 2012

Photo of the Day: Audience members listen as GOP nominee Mitt Romney speaks at a campaign rally October 24, 2012. (Brian Snyder/Courtesy Reuters) Photo of the Day: Audience members listen as GOP nominee Mitt Romney speaks at a campaign rally October 24, 2012. (Brian Snyder/Courtesy Reuters)

In an interview with the Des Moines Register editorial board made public yesterday, President Obama said that if elected, a budget deal similar to last year’s “grand bargain” will be passed to avoid the fiscal cliff (NBC).

“It will probably be messy. It won’t be pleasant. But I am absolutely confident that we can get what is the equivalent of the grand bargain that essentially I’ve been offering to the Republicans for a very long time,” he said. Obama also said that if he wins he would attempt to accomplish comprehensive immigration reform (ABC).

This CFR Issue Tracker looks at both candidates’ stances on immigration


In a  major policy speech yesterday, GOP vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan said he and Mitt Romney would reform programs for the poor by turning federal anti-poverty programs into block grants (HuffingtonPost), which would give states the flexibility to use the money as they see fit.

As a congressman, Ryan has proposed block grants as a way to cut government spending. An Urban Institute analysis of his proposal to turn Medicaid into a block grant found it “would reduce federal spending by $1.7 trillion and Medicaid enrollment by 50 percent, resulting in a loss of insurance for 35.7 million Americans,” reports the Huffington Post.

Read more about the candidates’ positions on the economy in this CFR Issue Tracker.


State Department emails (ABC) released Tuesday indicate that several government agencies, including the executive office of the president, were notified that the attack on the consulate in Benghazi may have been a planned terrorist attack within hours of it happening (CNN), adding new fodder for criticism of  the president’s foreign policy on the campaign trail.

GOP nominee Mitt Romney has criticized President Obama a number of times, saying he has not being forthcoming about the details of the attack and Daniel Henninger writes in the Wall Street Journal that Benghazi has created a “credibility gap” for the president.

This CFR Issue Tracker looks at both candidates’ stances on democracy promotion in the Arab world.

–Contributing Editor Kirsti Itameri

Comments are closed.