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Transition 2012

A guide to foreign policy and the 2012 U.S. presidential transition.

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Midday Update: Election’s Last Jobs Report Set for Release

by Newsteam Staff
November 1, 2012

Photo of the Day: President Obama talks in a New Jersey neighborhood after it was destroyed by Hurricane Sandy in New Jersey October 31, 2012. (Larry Downing/Courtesy Reuters) Photo of the Day: President Obama talks in a New Jersey neighborhood after it was destroyed by Hurricane Sandy in New Jersey October 31, 2012. (Larry Downing/Courtesy Reuters)

The federal government will release the October jobs report, the last to be issued before Election Day, on Friday morning as scheduled (NYT) despite a two-day shutdown caused by Hurricane Sandy.

“Economists expect the jobs figures to show slow, steady employment growth, the product of an anemic but persistent recovery, with the unemployment rate remaining about where it is in the coming months,” reports the New York Times.

“Coming four days before voters go from the polls, the headlines out of this report, and their political resonance, could well be more important than whatever it actually tells us about the economy,” reports the Washington Post.

Read more about the candidates’ positions on the economy in this CFR Issue Tracker.


Senator Bob Corker (R-TN) looks likely to be elected to a second term (Gannett) and become either the chairman or ranking member on the Foreign Relations Committee, given the coming departure of Ranking Republican Dick Lugar of Indiana, who lost his seat in a primary challenge earlier this year.

Corker has been one of the most vocal critics of President Obama’s handling of the Benghazi attack and has traveled to the Middle East twice during his reelection campaign. He has said he thinks the committee should be “trying to have hearings focusing on what are our real national interests,” such as international finance and resource issues and a review of State department programs and foreign aid, reports Gannett.

Josh Rogin writes in Foreign Policy  that “Corker has been a moderate voice on foreign policy as a committee member, often expressing a more cautious and non-interventionist note than some of his more hawkish colleagues, and has bucked the GOP leadership in some cases, such as when he voted in favor of Obama’s nuclear arms treaty with Russia, New START, at the end of 2010.”


Although the Democrats have a good chance of retaining control of the Senate, The Nation examines what changes would take place at the committee level if Republicans were to win a majority of seats.

–Contributing Editor Kirsti Itameri

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