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Transition 2012

A guide to foreign policy and the 2012 U.S. presidential transition.

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Views from Abroad: German Magazine on Obama’s ‘Failures’

by calessi
The Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, October 2011 (Fabrizio Bensch/Courtesy Reuters). The Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, October 2011 (Fabrizio Bensch/Courtesy Reuters).

For this week’s Views, we turn to Germany’s weekly news magazine Der Spiegel. In a wide reaching, feature-length piece on the U.S. presidential race, reporters Ullrich Fichtner, Marc Hujer, and Gregor Peter Schmitz argue that President Barack Obama has “failed to deliver” on many of the policies he championed before being elected in 2008. Read more »

Views from Abroad: Australia on the Two-Man Race

by Toni Johnson
Sydney Harbor, October 2008. (Tim Wimborne/Courtsey Reuters) Sydney Harbor, October 2008. (Tim Wimborne/Courtsey Reuters)

In this week’s Views, we head to Australia, where ABC’s John Barron discusses what is now a two-man presidential race between Democratic incumbent Barack Obama and the GOP’s Mitt Romney, who this week finally garnered enough delegates to clinch the nomination. Read more »

Views from Abroad: Brazil on U.S. Immigration

by Toni Johnson
Sugar Loaf mountain in Rio de Janeiro, April 8, 2010. (Sergio Moraes/ Courtesy Reuters) Sugar Loaf mountain in Rio de Janeiro, April 8, 2010. (Sergio Moraes/ Courtesy Reuters)

On this week’s views, we have some interesting items via the site Worldcrunch, which kindly translates partner news outlets from around the world into English and has a section devoted to “Eyes on the U.S.”

To start, we head to Brazil to hear the story of Lucas Santos, who came to the United States illegally with his parents thirteen years ago as a boy of eight. Read more »

Views from Abroad: Egyptian Candidate Discusses U.S. Race

by Toni Johnson
Egyptian soldiers walk in front of the Great Giza pyramids February 9, 2011. (Mohamed Abd El-Ghany/Courtesy Reuters) Egyptian soldiers walk in front of the Great Giza pyramids February 9, 2011. (Mohamed Abd El-Ghany/Courtesy Reuters)

On this week’s views, we will start in Egypt, a country that has seen tremendous upheaval in the last year and is about to select a new president for the first time in decades. Presidential candidate Amr Moussa sat down with CNN’s Christiane Amanpour. Here is what he had to say: Read more »

Views from Abroad: India’s Interest in the U.S. Race

by Toni Johnson
Red Fort during full dress rehearsals for Independence Day celebrations in New Delhi, August 13, 2004. (Kamal Kishore/Courtesy Reuters) Red Fort during full dress rehearsals for Independence Day celebrations in New Delhi, August 13, 2004. (Kamal Kishore/Courtesy Reuters)

On this week’s views, we head to India for an interview with New Delhi-based C. Raja Mohan, an expert in U.S.-India relations, discusses the U.S. presidential campaign from an Indian perspective. He says India’s “chattering classes” are taking a general interest in the campaign and there is a growing awareness that U.S. political developments can affect Indian interests, particularly policies on China, Pakistan, and other issues crucial to Delhi. Here is part of what he had to say: Read more »

Views from Abroad: More on China’s Take on the U.S. Race

by Toni Johnson
Imperial Vault of Heaven in Beijing October 28, 2007. (David Gray/Courtesy Reuters) Imperial Vault of Heaven in Beijing October 28, 2007. (David Gray/Courtesy Reuters)

This week we interviewed Jia Qingguo, a leading American studies scholar based in Beijing, who says, despite the campaign rhetoric against China on issues like trade, most Chinese leaders believe this is just politics and no matter who is elected in November, U.S. policy on China is unlikely to significantly change. Read more »

Views from Abroad: No Love From China for the GOP Field

by Toni Johnson
A crowd gathers below the portrait of the late Chinese leader Mao Zedong in Tiananmen Square in Beijing March 14, 2010. (David Gray/Courtesy Reuters) A crowd gathers below the portrait of the late Chinese leader Mao Zedong in Tiananmen Square in Beijing March 14, 2010. (David Gray/Courtesy Reuters)

In this week’s views, we return to China where candidates’ foreign policy pronouncements seems to be making waves with the media. Our first stop is People’s Daily Overseas, where they note “some of the presidential candidates choose to groundlessly attack China to shift the U.S. public’s attention from the country’s domestic woes,” and have decided to hit back with this analysis: Read more »

Views from Abroad: In Brazil, U.S. Election a Low Priority

by Toni Johnson
Christ the Redeemer atop of Corcovado mountain in Rio de Janeiro, January 12, 2011. (Bruno Domingos/Courtesy Reuters) Christ the Redeemer atop of Corcovado mountain in Rio de Janeiro, January 12, 2011. (Bruno Domingos/Courtesy Reuters)

In this week’s post, we head to Brazil for an interview with Matias Spektor, an American Affairs expert in Rio de Janiero, and CFR’s Bernard Gwertzman. Spektor says Brazilians aren’t sure what to make of this U.S. presidential election cycle and are mostly focused on domestic affairs: Read more »

Views from Abroad: Farewell American Dream

by Toni Johnson
Event to mark the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center near the Eiffel Tower in Paris September 11, 2011. (Gonzalo Fuentes/Courtesy Reuters) Event to mark the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center near the Eiffel Tower in Paris September 11, 2011. (Gonzalo Fuentes/Courtesy Reuters)

In this week’s Views from Abroad, we head to France, where Le Monde’s Claire Gatinois looks at the so-called “Gatsby curve,” on U.S. upward mobility at a time of great voter anxiety on the economy and jobs.  Gatinois notes that “fusty” Europe is outstripping “Paris Hilton’s America” on the ability of children to do better economically than their parents: Read more »