CFR Presents

Campaign 2008

The Candidates and the World

Morning Update: Leaving Iraq

by campaign2008 Friday, February 29, 2008

Admiral Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs, warned Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-NY) and Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL) Thursday that a rapid withdrawal from Iraq would “turn around the gains we have achieved, and struggled to achieve, and turn them around overnight.” Still, Mullen said, “When a new president comes in, I will get my orders and I will carry them out” (ABC).

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Morning Update: Iraq, NAFTA, Bloomberg

by campaign2008 Thursday, February 28, 2008

Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) and Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL) engaged in a general election-style war of words over Iraq policy. Meanwhile, Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-NY) explained the progression of her position on NAFTA. In an interview with PBS’ NewsHour Wednesday, she said NAFTA’s negative impact was “not so obvious in the economy” until the Bush administration took office because “they stopped enforcing trade agreements, they really stopped going to bat to try to keep jobs in this country.”

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Quotes of the Day

by campaign2008 Wednesday, February 27, 2008

“Senator Obama talks about the costs of the war in Iraq — despite our increasing suMcCainccess — but refuses to address the catastrophic costs that would result from precipitous withdrawal and defeat in Iraq. Surrender and defeat in Iraq will ultimately cost far more in lives and treasure than will continued success and achieving victory with honor.”

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Morning Update: NAFTA’s Shadow in Ohio

by campaign2008 Wednesday, February 27, 2008

In what has been billed as the most important debate of the campaign so far, the final two Democratic candidates met Tuesday night in Ohio to hash out disagreements on issues like NAFTA, foreign policy expertise, and health care. Countering Sen. Barack Obama’s contention, Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-NY) said she has “been a critic of NAFTA from the very beginning,” but that she did not make her objections to it in public in the 1990s because “I was part of the administration.” Obama rejected Clinton’s claim, saying “it is inaccurate for Senator Clinton to say that she’s always opposed NAFTA. In her campaign for Senate, she said that NAFTA, on balance, had been good for New York and good for America.” Both candidates said they would renegotiate NAFTA to ensure more labor and environmental protections.

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Withdrawing from Iraq

by campaign2008 Tuesday, February 26, 2008

tcarpenter.jpgIn the latest installment of this week’s CFR.org Online Debate, Ted Galen Carpenter, vice president for defense and foreign policy studies at the libertarian Cato Institute, says the U.S. invasion and occupation of Iraq have been “an ideal recruiting poster for al-Qaeda globally,” and that a withdrawal of U.S. troops would “deprive the organization of that rallying cry.” He maintains the recent lull in violence in Iraq has been due in large part to ethnic cleansing and ethnic segregation in Baghdad.

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Clinton’s Foreign Policy Speech

by campaign2008 Tuesday, February 26, 2008

hillary-clinton_1.jpgSen. Hillary Clinton’s speech in Washington, D.C., on Monday generated discussion again about the foreign policy credentials of Sen. Barack Obama. Less noted was the bleak foreign affairs outlook Clinton painted. She mentioned wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, countries “rushing to acquire nuclear weapons,” and “crushing” global poverty. She also pointed to climate change, disease pandemics, genocide in Darfur, terrorism, and the “rise of borderless, stateless criminal cartels.” Clinton drew distinctions between herself and opponent Barack Obama, and attempted to portray herself as a safe bet for voters concerned about foreign policy. “The American people don’t have to guess whether I understand the issues, or whether I would need a foreign policy instruction manual to guide me through a crisis, or whether I’d have to rely on advisers to introduce me to global affairs,” she said.

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Morning Update: Foreign Policy Contest

by campaign2008 Tuesday, February 26, 2008

In a speech Monday in Washington, D.C., Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-NY) again drew distinctions between herself and opponent Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL), and attempted to portray herself as a safe bet for voters concerned about foreign policy. “The American people don’t have to guess whether I understand the issues, or whether I would need a foreign policy instruction manual to guide me through a crisis, or whether I’d have to rely on advisers to introduce me to global affairs,” she said.

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