John Campbell

Africa in Transition

Campbell tracks political and security developments across sub-Saharan Africa.

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Showing posts for "Poaching"

Zimbabwe: The ‘Crocodile’ Who Would Be King

by Guest Blogger for John Campbell
Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe congratulates Emmerson Mnangagwa (R) after he was sworn in as Zimbabwe's vice president at the State House in Harare, December 12, 2014. (Philimon Bulawayo/Courtesy Reuters) Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe congratulates Emmerson Mnangagwa (R) after he was sworn in as Zimbabwe's vice president at the State House in Harare, December 12, 2014. (Philimon Bulawayo/Courtesy Reuters)

This is a guest post by Allen Grane, research associate for the Council on Foreign Relations Africa Studies program.

Amid a public debate over the presidential succession, President Robert Mugabe named Emmerson Mnangagwa vice-president of Zimbabwe on December 10, 2014. It would seem that Mnangagwa, nicknamed ‘Ngwena’ or ‘Crocodile,’ is now the heir apparent to Zimbabwe’s president. Mnangagwa has been a member of Mugabe’s ZANU-PF party since the 1960’s, and fought alongside Mugabe in the Zimbabwe war of liberation from white rule, which lasted from 1964 to 1979. Among other duties, Mnangagwa has served as Zimbabwe’s minister of state security, and, most recently, he was the minister of justice. Read more »

1,155 Rhinos Poached in South Africa

by Guest Blogger for John Campbell
A White Rhino and her calf walk in the dusk light in Pilanesberg National Park in South Africa's North West Province, April 19, 2012. (Mike Hutchings/Courtesy Reuters) A White Rhino and her calf walk in the dusk light in Pilanesberg National Park in South Africa's North West Province, April 19, 2012. (Mike Hutchings/Courtesy Reuters)

This is a guest post by Allen Grane, research associate for the Council on Foreign Relations Africa Studies program.

Home to the world’s largest rhino population, South Africa saw 1,155 rhinos illegally killed in 2014. That is a 15 percent increase on 2013’s 1004 poached rhinos. More than 4.6 percent of an approximate total of 25,000 rhinos in Africa were killed this past year in South Africa alone. Read more »

Tracking the Traffickers: Stopping the Wildlife Trade at its Source

by Guest Blogger for John Campbell
A worker uses a forklift to arrange a section of elephant tusks recovered from a container on transit, at the Kenyan port city of Mombasa, January 15, 2013. (Joseph Okanga/Courtesy Reuters) A worker uses a forklift to arrange a section of elephant tusks recovered from a container on transit, at the Kenyan port city of Mombasa, January 15, 2013. (Joseph Okanga/Courtesy Reuters)

This is a guest post by Allen Grane, research associate for the Council on Foreign Relations Africa Studies program.

On December 8, the Duke of Cambridge, Prince William, announced the creation of the United for Wildlife Task Force at the World Bank in Washington, DC (you can see the full speech below). The task force aims to work with the private sector to reduce illegal wildlife trafficking globally, it hopes to “identify ways that the sector can break the chain between suppliers and consumers.” Read more »

Rhino Passing

by Guest Blogger for John Campbell
A Southern White Rhino named Bella walks with her one-day-old baby at the Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary in Nakasongola, north of Uganda's capital Kampala, April 3, 2014. (Edward Echwalu/Courtesy Reuters) A Southern White Rhino named Bella walks with her one-day-old baby at the Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary in Nakasongola, north of Uganda's capital Kampala, April 3, 2014. (Edward Echwalu/Courtesy Reuters)

This is a guest post by Allen Grane, research associate for the Council on Foreign Relations Africa Studies program.

On October 17, Suni, a northern white rhino, was found dead in his enclosure at Old Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya. Suni who died of natural causes was one of only two breeding males left of his subspecies. He was born in the Czech Republic, and at thirty-four he was the youngest male northern white rhino. Read more »

Central African Republic: “It’s the Economy, Stupid!”

by Guest Blogger for John Campbell
Seleka fighters take a break as they sit on a pick-up truck in the town of Goya, June 11, 2014. 
(Goran Tomasevic/Courtesy Reuters) Seleka fighters take a break as they sit on a pick-up truck in the town of Goya, June 11, 2014. (Goran Tomasevic/Courtesy Reuters)

This is a guest post by Emily Mellgard, research associate for the Council on Foreign Relations Africa Studies program.

The devastating yet disorganized fury and violence over the past eighteen months in the Central African Republic (CAR) has caused the collapse of the state and defied traditional conflict labels and international quick-fixes. Read more »

African Wildlife Conservation and Kenya’s Wildlife Policy Act

by Guest Blogger for John Campbell
An elephant stretches during their aerial census at the Tsavo West national park within the Tsavo-Mkomazi ecosystem, southeast of Kenya's capital Nairobi, February 4, 2014. (Thomas Mukoya/Courtesy Reuters) An elephant stretches during their aerial census at the Tsavo West national park within the Tsavo-Mkomazi ecosystem, southeast of Kenya's capital Nairobi, February 4, 2014. (Thomas Mukoya/Courtesy Reuters)

This is a guest post by Mrs. Joan Sikand, Esq. She has served as development coordinator of the Wildlife Foundation since its inception in 2000. She has been a member of Friends of Nairobi National Park since 1995, and served as its vice-chairwoman from 2004 to 2007. Her articles on conservation have been published in the Kenyan daily, “The People.” Read more »

Tracking the Traffickers: Understanding the Illegal Wildlife Trade Supply Chain

by Guest Blogger for John Campbell
A Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) officer stands guard near a shipment of elephant tusks and rhino horns which was intercepted at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, in the capital Nairobi, August 23, 2010. (Thomas Mukoya/Courtesy Reuters) A Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) officer stands guard near a shipment of elephant tusks and rhino horns which was intercepted at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, in the capital Nairobi, August 23, 2010. (Thomas Mukoya/Courtesy Reuters)

This is a guest post by Emily Mellgard, research associate for the Council on Foreign Relations Africa Studies program.

Over the past year the plight of Africa’s elephants and rhinos has captured international imagination; in December 2013, the UN proclaimed March 3 to be World Wildlife Day. Moving beyond the headlines, countering wildlife slaughter and trade requires a better understanding of the illicit wildlife supply chain and what, beyond poverty and greed, motivates its participants. Read more »

Tracking the Traffickers: The Debate over Legalizing Trade in Rhino Horn

by Guest Blogger for John Campbell
Kenya Wildlife Service  wardens wait for a tranquilized male white rhinoceros to collapse to the ground, before implanting a radio transmitter, at the Lake Nakuru national park in Kenya's Rift Valley, 160 km (99 miles) west of the capital Nairobi, November 8, 2013. (Thomas Mukoya/Courtesy Reuters) Kenya Wildlife Service wardens wait for a tranquilized male white rhinoceros to collapse to the ground, before implanting a radio transmitter, at the Lake Nakuru national park in Kenya's Rift Valley, 160 km (99 miles) west of the capital Nairobi, November 8, 2013. (Thomas Mukoya/Courtesy Reuters)

This is a guest post by Emily Mellgard, research associate for the Council on Foreign Relations Africa Studies program.

2014 has had a bad beginning with respect to the preservation of Africa’s remaining rhino populations. The South African government announced that by January 17, thirty-seven rhinos had been killed in South Africa. According to the Washington Post on January 31, over 1,600 have been killed worldwide in the past two years. There could be fewer than 25,000 rhino left worldwide. Read more »