Isobel Coleman

Democracy in Development

Coleman maps the intersections between political reform, economic growth, and U.S. policy in the developing world.

Libya’s New Election Law: Part II

by Isobel Coleman Thursday, January 5, 2012
Libyan PM Keib and NTC Chairman Jalil speak in Benghazi, Libya, December 26, 2011 (Esam Al-Fetori/Courtesy Reuters). Libyan PM Keib and NTC Chairman Jalil speak in Benghazi, Libya, December 26, 2011 (Esam Al-Fetori/Courtesy Reuters).

I’ve received a number of comments on my post yesterday about Libya’s new (draft) election law, so I’m revisiting that topic again today.  First, for those of you who are interested (and several have asked), here’s a link to an unofficial English translation of the draft law. Second, in a new development, the Libyan interim government yesterday scrapped the 1972 law banning political parties. In anticipation of this, new parties have been forming over the past several months and many more are undoubtedly in the wings. Civil society, lacking for decades in Libya, is resurrecting itself, although the challenges it faces will be formidable. Religiously oriented groups will likely have an edge both in organizational capacity and in financing. Read more »

Libya’s New Election Law

by Isobel Coleman Wednesday, January 4, 2012

A billboard carrying the slogan 'Today we reconcile together' is seen in Tripoli in December 2011 (Courtesy Reuters).

On Sunday, Libya’s electoral commission published online a draft of a new electoral law for public review, sparking much debate in online forums and in the press. The electoral laws will govern the election of a national constituent assembly that will replace the ruling National Transitional Council (NTC). The assembly will subsequently appoint a prime minister, form a commission to write a constitution, hold a constitutional referendum, write a new electoral law, and hold general elections to elect a permanent government. Read more »