Isobel Coleman

Democracy in Development

Coleman maps the intersections between political reform, economic growth, and U.S. policy in the developing world.

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Washington Should Suspend Aid to Egypt

by Isobel Coleman
August 15, 2013

Riot police fire tear gas during clashes with members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi, Cairo, Egypt, August 14, 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Mohamed Abd El Ghany). Riot police fire tear gas during clashes with members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi, Cairo, Egypt, August 14, 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Mohamed Abd El Ghany).

The Egyptian military’s recent violent crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood makes clear that, despite their claims to the contrary, General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi and his armed forces have no intention of supporting Egypt’s democratic process. It is time that Washington call the military’s actions what they are: a coup. As I write in an article on USA Today online:

Calls for a return to a democratic process have gone unheeded. Yet that remains the only way out of Egypt’s crisis. The military’s crackdown will inevitably lead to more violence and instability, putting at risk broader US strategic interests. The Obama administration must now make the long overdue move to suspend American assistance until Egypt’s government demonstrates a return to a political process.

Read the full article here. 

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