Isobel Coleman

Democracy in Development

Coleman maps the intersections between political reform, economic growth, and U.S. policy in the developing world.

Women’s Challenges, and Opportunities, in Yemen

by Isobel Coleman Wednesday, February 19, 2014
A woman holds the national flag during a parade in Sanaa, Yemen, May 2011 (Courtesy Reuters/Ammar Awad). A woman holds the national flag during a parade in Sanaa, Yemen, May 2011 (Courtesy Reuters/Ammar Awad).

Earlier this month, I hosted Abdul Karim Ali Al-Eryani, former prime minister of Yemen, at a Council on Foreign Relations discussion. Al-Eryani recently concluded his role as a leader of Yemen’s ten-month-long National Dialogue Conference (NDC), a process that brought together rival political, tribal, religious, and social groups to craft a roadmap for the country’s political transition. Although Yemen is still struggling with escalating violence, secessionist threats, and a humanitarian crisis of poverty and malnourishment, the inclusive NDC was widely hailed for at least pulling the country back from the brink of civil war. Read more »

Tackling Unemployment in Egypt through Apprenticeship

by Isobel Coleman Monday, February 10, 2014
Workers construct framework for advertising boards in downtown Cairo, Egypt, June 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Amr Abdallah Dalsh). Workers construct framework for advertising boards in downtown Cairo, Egypt, June 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Amr Abdallah Dalsh).

Several articles in Egypt’s new constitution make an effort to address what is arguably one of the most critical long-term challenges facing the country: high levels of unemployment -particularly youth unemployment.  Not only does the new constitution mandate increased spending on education and research and development, it also specifies that the government must expand technical and vocational training “in keeping with the needs of the labor market.” Read more »