Steven A. Cook

From the Potomac to the Euphrates

Cook examines developments in the Middle East and their resonance in Washington.

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Showing posts for "Egypt"

Weekend Reading: Turkey’s Intelligence State, Egypt’s Subsidies, and Syria’s European Jihadis

by Steven A. Cook
Lebanese Christian priests distribute painted eggs in celebration of Easter after an Easter service at St. George church in central Beirut (Jamal Saidi/Courtesy Reuters). Lebanese Christian priests distribute painted eggs in celebration of Easter after an Easter service at St. George church in central Beirut (Jamal Saidi/Courtesy Reuters).

Fehim Tastekin wonders if Turkey is reverting to an intelligence state.

Mohamed Gad, writing for Mada Masr, asks if current Egyptian Finance Minister Hany Qadry will actually reform Egypt’s subsidies. Read more »

Powering the Way to a Darker Tomorrow: Coal Cannot Solve Egypt’s Energy Crisis

by Guest Blogger for Steven A. Cook
Mostafa Khaled, 20, studies by candlelight for his early morning exams during a power cut in Toukh, El-Kalubia governorate, northeast of Cairo (Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Courtesy Reuters). Mostafa Khaled, 20, studies by candlelight for his early morning exams during a power cut in Toukh, El-Kalubia governorate, northeast of Cairo (Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Courtesy Reuters).

I am pleased to cross post the following article with my friends at The Tahrir Institute for Middle East Policy.  Allison McManus’ timely post on the problems in Egypt’s energy sector and coal is an excellent follow-up to my recent Contingency Planning Memorandum on the potential for a solvency crisis in that country.  I hope readers find it interesting and useful. Read more »

Weekend Reading: Boutef Again, Bringing Democracy Back to Turkey, and Hep-C in Egypt

by Steven A. Cook
Members of a local dance troupe perform during a campaign rally for current Algerian President and candidate in the forthcoming presidential election, Abdelaziz Bouteflik, in Ain Ouassara southwest of Algiers April 10, 2014 (Louafi Larbi/Courtesy Reuters). Members of a local dance troupe perform during a campaign rally for current Algerian President and candidate in the forthcoming presidential election, Abdelaziz Bouteflik, in Ain Ouassara southwest of Algiers April 10, 2014 (Louafi Larbi/Courtesy Reuters).

Alexis Artaud de La Ferrière examines how Algeria’s elections will influence regional politics, especially those in Tunisia.

The Turkish citizen journalism group “140journos” is trying to use technology to bring democracy back to Turkey, writes Burcu Baykurt for Jadaliyya. Read more »

Be Afraid, Very Afraid: Egypt’s Economic Nightmare

by Steven A. Cook
A man talks on his mobile phone as he walks past an exchange bureau advertisement showing images of the U.S dollar (Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Courtesy Reuters). A man talks on his mobile phone as he walks past an exchange bureau advertisement showing images of the U.S dollar (Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Courtesy Reuters).

It would not be an overstatement to say that over the last decade Egypt has become a slow-rolling train wreck.  The fact that it has picked up steam in the last three years should be even less of a surprise.  Egypt analysts, policymakers, journalists, and legislators have become inured to the country’s increasingly violent politics, authoritarianism, and economic dysfunction. The violence that is now spreading out from the Sinai Peninsula and the force that the state has used to confront it is not likely to bring about a collapse of the Egyptian state, but the economy could. Read more »

Weekend Reading: No Way to Defeat Takfiris, Handicapping Turkey’s Elections, and Syria’s borders.

by Steven A. Cook
Supporters of Turkey's Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan wave Turkish and AK Party (AKP) flags during an election rally in Istanbul March 23, 2014 (Murad Sezer/Courtesy Reuters). Supporters of Turkey's Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan wave Turkish and AK Party (AKP) flags during an election rally in Istanbul March 23, 2014 (Murad Sezer/Courtesy Reuters).

Nader Bakkar says that harsh punishment, such as the recent wave of death sentences on Muslim Brotherhood members, is no way to combat radical takfiri ideology. Read more »

Sisi 2014!

by Steven A. Cook
A supporter of Egypt's  General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi holds a poster with Sisi's image in Tahrir Square in Cairo (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Courtesy Reuters). A supporter of Egypt's General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi holds a poster with Sisi's image in Tahrir Square in Cairo (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Courtesy Reuters).

This article was originally published here on ForeignPolicy.com on Wednesday, March 26, 2014.

Field Marshal Abdel Fattah al-Sisi hung up his military uniform today, launching a process that will inevitably end in his election as Egypt’s next president. Following a meeting of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF), Sisi declared that he has retired from the army and would enter the political arena. ”I humbly announce my intention to run for the presidency of the Arab Republic of Egypt,” he said in colloquial Arabic in a speech aired on state television. “I consider myself — as I have always been — a soldier dedicated to serve the nation, in any position ordered by the people.” Read more »

Weekend Reading: Islamic Sustainability, Cairo’s Traffic Goes Mobile, and Recycling in Qatar

by Steven A. Cook
Anti-Morsi protesters hold up posters of Egypt's army chief Abdel Fattah al-Sisi during a protest supporting al-Sisi in front of the state television building in central Cairo (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Courtesy Reuters). Anti-Morsi protesters hold up posters of Egypt's army chief Abdel Fattah al-Sisi during a protest supporting al-Sisi in front of the state television building in central Cairo (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Courtesy Reuters).

Arwa Aburawa interviews Professor Al Jayoussi about Islamic notions of sustainability.

Tafline Laylin discusses an award-winning Egyptian traffic app that helps users avoid the legendary Cairo traffic. Read more »

Saudi, The MB, and The Politics of Terrorism

by Steven A. Cook
A supporter of the Muslim Brotherhood and ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, wearing a headband that reads "We all are Rabaa", takes part in a protest against the military and interior ministry (Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Courtesy Reuters). A supporter of the Muslim Brotherhood and ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, wearing a headband that reads "We all are Rabaa", takes part in a protest against the military and interior ministry (Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Courtesy Reuters).

Last Friday, the Saudi government declared the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organization, lumping the Brothers in with Jabhat al Nusra, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, and al Qaeda.   The announcement was not terribly surprising.  Riyadh has proven to be Cairo’s staunchest patron since the July 3 coup d’état and both governments have led the effort to delegitimize the Brotherhood ever since.  This actually has much more to do with politics than it does with terrorism, which prompted me to tweet: Read more »