Steven A. Cook

From the Potomac to the Euphrates

Cook examines developments in the Middle East and their resonance in Washington.

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Showing posts for "Weekend Reading"

Weekend Reading: Egypt’s Colonial Laws, Building a New Cairo, and Erdogan’s Early Life

by Steven A. Cook
Buildings and houses are seen through the window of an airplane above Cairo (Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Reuters).

The Project on Middle East Democracy interviews Mohamed El Ansary on the use of a colonial-era law by the Egyptian state to contain unrest and crush demonstrations. Read more »

Weekend Reading: The Taxi Drivers of Damascus, Women’s Prisons in Egypt, and Morocco’s Meteorite Trade

by Steven A. Cook
A vendor sells books at Mutanabi Street in Baghdad (Mohammed Ameen/Reuters).

Mohamed Ozon explores life in Damascus today through the lens of the city’s taxi drivers.

Ravy Shaker, in a photo essay, takes a look at life inside women’s prisons in Egypt. Read more »

Weekend Reading: Islam and Liberalism, Lebanon’s Christians, and Turkey’s Dwindling Syria Options

by Steven A. Cook
Turkish soldiers participate in an exercise on the border line between Turkey and Syria near the southeastern city of Kilis, Turkey (Murad Sezer/Reuters).

Nervana Mahmoud critiques Brookings scholar Shadi Hamid’s assertion that illiberal Islam is a viable future for Muslim societies.

Tarek Osman explores the relationship between Lebanese Christians and foreign protectors, especially in light of French presidential contender Marine Le Pen’s visit last month. Read more »

Weekend Reading: Egypt’s Repression, Tripoli’s Tribulations, and the Golan’s Circassians

by Steven A. Cook
General view for Cairo international book fair in Cairo, Egypt (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters).

Read the El Nadim Center’s latest report on oppression in Egypt, published two weeks before authorities shut down the organization’s headquarters on February 9. Read more »

Weekend Reading: Ben Ali’s Flight, the Nawari of Gaza, and Algeria’s Independence Reconsidered

by Steven A. Cook
Tunisia's President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali addresses the nation in this still image taken from video, January 13, 2011 (Tunisian State TV/Handout/Reuters).

Middle East Eye interviews Mahmoud Cheikhrouhou, the pilot who flew Tunisia’s ousted president, Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, to Saudi Arabia in January 2011. Read more »

Weekend Reading: Russia in the Levant, the Uprising in Alexandria, and Tunisians Look Back

by Steven A. Cook
People wave national flags during celebrations marking the sixth anniversary of Tunisia's 2011 revolution in Habib Bourguiba Avenue in Tunis, Tunisia (Zoubeir Souissi/Reuters).

Ibrahim Hamidi finds parallels between Russian activity in Syria today and French military expansion in the Levant in the 1920s.

Youssef El Chazli recreates the events of the first day of Egypt’s 2011 uprising as they unfolded in Alexandria. Read more »

Weekend Reading: Middle Eastern Comic Art, Relocating the U.S. Embassy in Israel, and Egypt’s IMF Deal

by Steven A. Cook
A man browses a selection of Islamic books at a shop in the old city of Cairo (Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Reuters).

Jonathan Guyer explores the history of comic and caricature art in the Arab world and its role in Middle Eastern society.

Michael Koplow examines the costly nuances of moving the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Read more »

Weekend Reading: Turkey’s Constitution, Wine in Lebanon, and Iraq’s Provinces

by Steven A. Cook
A Syrian labourer gathers grapes at Chateau Kefraya in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley at the end of the harvest (Jamal Saidi/Reuters).

Michael Daventry tracks the voting progress on eighteen amendments to Turkey’s constitution as the so-called “executive presidency” bill makes its way through the Turkish legislature. Read more »

Weekend Reading: A Changing Discourse on Syria, Salman’s Saudi Troubles, and Turkey’s Soft Power

by Steven A. Cook
Saudi King Salman bin Abbulaziz Al-Saud attends the Gulf Cooperation Council's (GCC) 37th Summit in Manama, Bahrain (Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters).

Nervana Mahmoud considers how the discourse on the Syrian conflict could change in 2017.

Alain Gresh finds that Saudi Arabia’s King Salman can claim few successes in his time as ruler so far. Read more »