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Net Politics

CFR experts investigate the impact of information and communication technologies on security, privacy, and international affairs.

Axiom and the Deepening Divide in U.S.-China Cyber Relations

by Adam Segal Wednesday, October 29, 2014
Part of the building of 'Unit 61398,' a secretive Chinese military unit, is seen in the outskirts of Shanghai on February 19, 2013. (Carlos Barria/Courtesy Reuters) Part of the building of 'Unit 61398,' a secretive Chinese military unit, is seen in the outskirts of Shanghai on February 19, 2013. (Carlos Barria/Courtesy Reuters)

Recent revelations by a group of security researchers of another China-based hacking group, reportedly more sophisticated than Unit 61398, is likely to set off the usual recriminations and denials, but have very little impact on the U.S.-China bilateral relationship. The Chinese embassy has already responded that “these kinds of reports or allegations are usually fictitious,” a response that Robert Dix, vice president of government affairs for Juniper Networks, colorfully and baldly describes as the Chinese giving “a big middle finger to anybody in the United States that’s tried to out them or point fingers in their direction.”

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Kissinger on Cyberspace

by Adam Segal Monday, October 27, 2014
Former U.S. Secretary of State Dr. Henry Kissinger waves to the media as he leaves the Royal Albert Hall in London on April 24, 2002. (Kieran Doherty/Courtesy Reuters) Former U.S. Secretary of State Dr. Henry Kissinger waves to the media as he leaves the Royal Albert Hall in London on April 24, 2002. (Kieran Doherty/Courtesy Reuters)

In 1954, U.S. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles delivered a speech at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) threatening massive nuclear retaliation as the basis of American foreign policy. Many experts feared that the policy would in fact increase the chances of a nuclear war, and soon after CFR convened a study group chaired by former U.S. Secretary of State Dr. Henry Kissinger to identify the long-term implications of nuclear weapons. That group led to the publication in 1957 of his book, Nuclear Weapons and Foreign Policy, a seminal work that explored the concepts of nuclear stability, deterrence, and arms control that continue to shape U.S. nuclear and arms control policy today.

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The United States and the ITU: Holding the Multistakeholder Line

by Adam Segal Wednesday, October 22, 2014
Vishant Patel, senior manager of investigations at the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit, shows a heat map and talks about how malicious computer networks known as the Citadel Botnets attack computers in Western Europe at the Microsoft Cybercrime Center in Redmond, Washington on November 11, 2013. (Jason Redmond/Courtesy Reuters) Vishant Patel, senior manager of investigations at the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit, shows a heat map and talks about how malicious computer networks known as the Citadel Botnets attack computers in Western Europe at the Microsoft Cybercrime Center in Redmond, Washington on November 11, 2013. (Jason Redmond/Courtesy Reuters)

The Plenipotentiary of the United Nation’s International Telecommunications Union (ITU) began this week, and it is likely to be what the Washington Post calls, “the latest battle over who should run the Internet.”

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China Hosts Its Own Cyber Conference

by Adam Segal Tuesday, October 21, 2014
A woman uses a computer in an internet cafe at the centre of Shanghai on January 13, 2010. (Nir Elias/Courtesy Reuters) A woman uses a computer in an internet cafe at the centre of Shanghai on January 13, 2010. (Nir Elias/Courtesy Reuters)

Not wanting to be left out, after the United Kingdom, Hungary, and South Korea (PDF) all held conferences on cyberspace governance, China has announced that it will be hosting the World Internet Conference from November 19 to 21.  The  conference, planned by the Cyberspace Administration of China (formerly named the State Internet Information Office), has the stated mission to promote the “development of [the] Internet to be the global shared resources for human solidarity and economic progress.”

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Net Politics: A New Blog About Cybersecurity, Digital Trade, Privacy, and Internet Governance

by Adam Segal Tuesday, October 21, 2014
Backlit keyboard is reflected in screen of Apple Macbook Pro notebook computer in Warsaw on February 6, 2012. (Kacper Pempel/Courtesy Reuters) Backlit keyboard is reflected in screen of Apple Macbook Pro notebook computer in Warsaw on February 6, 2012. (Kacper Pempel/Courtesy Reuters)

Welcome to Net Politics, a blog about cybersecurity, digital trade, privacy, and Internet governance.

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