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CFR experts investigate the impact of information and communication technologies on security, privacy, and international affairs.

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Showing posts for "Digital trade"

The Link Between Internet Access and Economic Growth Is Not as Strong as You Think

by Guest Blogger
Internet.Org CFR Net Politics Cyber Zero Rating Mark Zuckerberg, founder and CEO of Facebook, addresses a gathering during the Internet.org Summit in New Delhi October 9, 2014. (Adnan Abidi/Reuters).

President Trump’s Unlikely Effect on the U.S.-EU Tech Relationship

by Guest Blogger
Protesters rally near the Eiffel Tower to demonstrate against U.S. President Donald Trump's immigration order in Paris, France, February 4, 2017. (Mal Langsdon/Reuters).

Marietje Schaake is a member of the European Parliament from the Netherlands. You can follow her @MarietjeSchaake

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New Report: Rebuilding Trust Between Silicon Valley and Washington

by Adam Segal
A man takes a picture of the U.S. Capitol in 2013. Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

It would be an understatement to say that the United States faces cybersecurity risks that threaten its economic, political and strategic interests. Despite the Obama administration’s best efforts (and there were many), the United States still faces considerable cyber policy challenges. Data localization policies test the business models of U.S. tech companies and limit the free flow of data necessary to the growth of digital trade. State-sponsored actors continue to target U.S. companies to pilfer proprietary data or trade secrets and the U.S. government for intelligence purposes. The issue of encryption continues to divide the U.S. tech community and law enforcement, a debate that has ripple effects worldwide.

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The Year in Review: Major Setbacks for Digital Trade in 2016

by David Fidler
TPP e-commerce chapter Net Politics Cyber CFR A worker gathers items for delivery from the warehouse floor at Amazon's distribution center in Phoenix, Arizona November 22, 2013. (Ralph D. Freso /Reuters)

What a difference one year makes. When 2015 ended, prospects for digital trade looked good. In bilateral, regional, and multilateral contexts, initiatives were advancing that were, in part, designed to increase opportunities for digital commerce and strengthen rules for it. The European Union launched its Digital Single Market strategy and was negotiating the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) agreement with the United States. In addition to TTIP, the United States concluded the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement with eleven countries, and was negotiating the Trade in Services Agreement (TISA) with over twenty nations and the European Union.

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What a Trump Administration Means for U.S. Digital Trade Policy

by David Fidler
CFR Cyber Net Politics An employee of a foreign exchange trading company works near monitors showing U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaking on TV news (top) in Tokyo, Japan, November 9, 2016. (Toru Hanai/Reuters).

With Donald Trump’s victory, the prospects for digital trade have dimmed. This development owes much to the hostility towards trade that Trump brings to the presidency. But it also involves shifts more fundamental than Trump’s rejection of trade agreements. The rise of digital commerce is rooted in the stability provided by international trade agreements, the global reach of the internet, and the innovations associated with digital technologies. U.S. leadership and global engagement underpinned each of these sources of digital trade’s growth. Now, Trump’s election combines with other forces afoot around the world to threaten the future of digital trade.

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Why Democrats and Republicans Should Oppose Data Localization

by Guest Blogger
CFR Cyber Net Politics Data Localization RNC DNC Campaign 2016 A journalist records a video on floor of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 18, 2016. (Mark Kauzlarich/Reuters).

Anupam Chander is Martin Luther King, Jr. Research Professor and Director of the California International Law Center at UC Davis School of Law. He is the recipient of a Google Research Award supporting related research.

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The Implications of Brexit on UK Cyber Policy

by David Fidler
CFR Cyber net politics brexit A British flag lies on the street in London after Britain voted to leave the European Union. (Reinhard Krause/REUTERS).

The United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union has prompted pundits and politicians to speculate on what the result means for the country, Europe, and the world. To paraphrase Churchill, never before have so few created such doubt for so many. These speculations touch on the practical politics and philosophical implications of the United Kingdom’s disengagement from the European Union. The Brexit process will affect practical and philosophical aspects of cyberspace politics as well.

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The White House Exaggerates the Benefits of the TPP to the Open Internet

by Guest Blogger
CFR Cyber Net Politics TPP The Obama administration's promotional materials of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) boast about its impact on keeping data flowing across borders. (Office of the United States Trade Representative).

Susan Aaronson is research professor of international affairs at George Washington University, and GWU cross-disciplinary scholar. Valeriya Denisova is a research assistant at GWU and a recent graduate of the Elliott School of International Affairs.

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The TTIP Leaks and the Future of Electronic Commerce in International Trade Law

by David Fidler
CFR Net Politics Cyber TTIP A member of the environmental campaign group Greenpeace holds a copy of the leaked TTIP negotiations during a news conference outlining its analysis of TTIP negotiations in Berlin, Germany, May 2, 2016. (Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters).

Greenpeace’s disclosure of negotiating documents concerning the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) agreement between the United States and the European Union (EU) has renewed controversies about TTIP specifically and trade agreements generally. Although the released documents do not cover all issues under negotiation or include the negotiating text on electronic commerce, the leaks highlight factors that spell trouble for the goal of modernizing international trade law for the digital age.

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