Robert M. Danin

Middle East Matters

Danin analyzes critical developments and U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East.

Print Print Email Email Share Share Cite Cite
Style: MLA APA Chicago Close

loading...

Voices From the Region: Syria, Egypt, Lebanon, and Bahrain

by Robert M. Danin
September 6, 2013

A Free Syrian Army fighter watches U.S. President Barack Obama's speech with his family in Ghouta, Damascus August 31, 2013 (Abdullah/Courtesy Reuters). A Free Syrian Army fighter watches U.S. President Barack Obama's speech with his family in Ghouta, Damascus August 31, 2013 (Abdullah/Courtesy Reuters).

“Obama will strike for the people…The regime also are fighting for the people, and the opposition is fighting for the people. And the people are damned.” –Abdelkader, a municipal employee from Raqqa

“Washington doesn’t understand the Middle East. [Obama’s] image here is of someone who is afraid of getting enmeshed in the machinations of the Middle East…There is no trust in Washington in the area because [people] think Obama is weak.” –Maher Abu-Teyr, a political columnist with Ad-Dustour, a semi-official Jordanian daily newspaper.

“We are before a tyrannical authority with interests very far from the revolution.” –Gamal Eid, a rights lawyer in Egypt

“And then there is the third side…The criminals. They will take everything from you.” –Ahmed, a Syrian teacher who fled to Lebanon

“Wefaq has an agenda against Bahrain as a state, and thus its comments against Bahrain cannot be taken at face value.” –Samira Rajab, Bahraini minister of information affairs dismissed the opposition group’s condemnation of Bahrain’s newly announced pan-Arab human rights court

“I know that this is not a postponement but a strategic pause to . . . set up for a surprise attack…Of course, people are depressed, and I’m having trouble convincing everyone that there will be a strike.” –Ahmad Nemah, a midlevel Syrian rebel commander

“The price of bread is 300 Syrian pounds on the regime’s side and 65 on [the rebel] side…Yesterday the [rebels] did not allow me to cross with bread so I will try again today.” -Abdo, a 23 year-old accountant, who lives in government-held territory but works in a rebel-controlled area

Post a Comment

CFR seeks to foster civil and informed discussion of foreign policy issues. Opinions expressed on CFR blogs are solely those of the author or commenter, not of CFR, which takes no institutional positions. All comments must abide by CFR's guidelines and will be moderated prior to posting.

* Required