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Development Channel

Issues and innovations in global economic development

Where Airstrikes Fall Short, the West Can Still Act to End Violence Against Women

by Guest Blogger for Gayle Tzemach Lemmon Tuesday, October 21, 2014
A Shiite Muslim girl takes part in a candlelight protest against the ongoing conflict in Iraq, in New Delhi, India, July 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Anindito Mukherjee). A Shiite Muslim girl takes part in a candlelight protest against the ongoing conflict in Iraq, in New Delhi, India, July 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Anindito Mukherjee).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Christina Asquith, a journalist who has covered women’s rights in the Middle East for ten years and the author of Sisters in War: A Story of Love, Family and Survival in the New Iraq.

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Yazidi Slave Markets Just the Latest Atrocity in the Syrian Conflict

by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon Friday, October 17, 2014
A member of the Syrian Arab Red Crescent carries a Kurdish Syrian refugee girl to the first aid tent after crossing the Turkish-Syrian border near the southeastern town of Suruc in Sanliurfa province, Turkey, September 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Murad Sezer). A member of the Syrian Arab Red Crescent carries a Kurdish Syrian refugee girl to the first aid tent after crossing the Turkish-Syrian border near the southeastern town of Suruc in Sanliurfa province, Turkey, September 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Murad Sezer).

This week, reports of Yazidi women forced into marriage, raped, and sold as slaves to Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) fighters have spurred horror and outrage around the world. Human Rights Watch reports that these captives, some as young as ten or twelve, have been abducted from their families and been beaten into submitting to marriage to their captors. Read more »

Truly Sustainable Development Calls for Systemic Responses

by Guest Blogger for Gayle Tzemach Lemmon Thursday, October 16, 2014
Orphans wait to be given snacks at the Mphandula Childcare Center at Namitete, outside Lilongwe, Malawi, April 2008 (Courtesy Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko). Orphans wait to be given snacks at the Mphandula Childcare Center at Namitete, outside Lilongwe, Malawi, April 2008 (Courtesy Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Alicia Ely Yamin, lecturer on global health and policy director of the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard University.

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Malala’s Nobel Prize Highlights Girls’ Education

by Catherine Powell Friday, October 10, 2014
Pakistani schoolgirl activist Malala Yousafzai poses for pictures at the United Nations in New York, New York, August 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Carlo Allegri). Pakistani schoolgirl activist Malala Yousafzai poses for pictures at the United Nations in New York, New York, August 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Carlo Allegri).

This morning’s awarding of the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize to Malala Yousafzai of Pakistan, along with children’s rights activist Kailash Satyarthi of India, comes at an important moment.

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Viewing the U.S.–Afghan Bilateral Security Agreement Through a Gender Lens

by Catherine Powell Tuesday, October 7, 2014
Afghan National Security Advisor Hanif Atmar and U.S. Ambassador James Cunningham sign the bilateral security agreement in Kabul, Afghanistan, September 30, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Mohammad Ismail). Afghan National Security Advisor Hanif Atmar and U.S. Ambassador James Cunningham sign the bilateral security agreement in Kabul, Afghanistan, September 30, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Mohammad Ismail).

After almost a year of stalemate, Afghanistan finally signed a renewed bilateral security agreement (BSA) with the United States last Tuesday. The document, which allows 9,800 U.S. troops and 2,000 NATO troops to remain in Afghanistan in a training and advisory capacity after the end of 2014, was approved by newly-minted Afghan President Ashraf Ghani. Read more »

The West Steps Forward in the Fight Against Female Genital Mutilation

by Guest Blogger for Gayle Tzemach Lemmon Wednesday, October 1, 2014
Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron speaks at the Girl Summit in London, July 22, 2014. The prime minister announced that Britain is to make it compulsory for teachers and health workers to report cases of female genital mutilation (Courtesy Reuters/Oli Scarff/Pool). Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron speaks at the Girl Summit in London, July 22, 2014. The prime minister announced that Britain is to make it compulsory for teachers and health workers to report cases of female genital mutilation (Courtesy Reuters/Oli Scarff/Pool).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Becky Allen, former intern in the Women and Foreign Policy program.

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From the Board Room to the Factory Floor, Employing Women Is Smart Business

by Guest Blogger for Gayle Tzemach Lemmon Tuesday, September 23, 2014
Ethnic Dong women work at a tea leaf processing factory in Liping county, Guizhou province, China, March 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Sheng Li). Ethnic Dong women work at a tea leaf processing factory in Liping county, Guizhou province, China, March 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Sheng Li).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Henriette Kolb, head of the Gender Secretariat at the International Finance Corporation (IFC), and Nasim Novin, consultant at the IFC Gender Secretariat.

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Food Security and the Need for Responsible Investment Guidelines

by Guest Blogger for Gayle Tzemach Lemmon Monday, September 15, 2014
A farmer collects rice during harvest time at a paddy field in Padalarang, Indonesia's West Java province, May 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Beawiharta). A farmer collects rice during harvest time at a paddy field in Padalarang, Indonesia's West Java province, May 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Beawiharta).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Gregory Myers, director of private sector engagement at Cloudburst Group and former division chief for the Land Tenure and Property Rights Division at the U.S. Agency for International Development.

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Unlocking the Potential of Women Entrepreneurs

by Isobel Coleman and Guest Blogger for Isobel Coleman Wednesday, September 10, 2014
Varsha Mahendra, founder of DSGYN IDYS and Jus Blouses, works in her showroom and in the factory in Hyderabad, India, October 2012 (Courtesy Goldman Sachs). Varsha Mahendra, founder of DSGYN IDYS and Jus Blouses, works in her showroom and in the factory in Hyderabad, India, October 2012 (Courtesy Goldman Sachs).

This post is from Isobel Coleman, Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) senior fellow and director of the Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy initiative, and Dina Habib Powell, global head of corporate engagement at Goldman Sachs and president of the Goldman Sachs Foundation. 

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Women’s Achievements and Continued Challenges in Afghanistan

by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon Monday, September 8, 2014
Afghan women take part in a literacy class at the Organisation of Promoting Afghan Women's Capabilities (OPAWC) center in Kabul, Afghanistan, March 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Zohra Bensemra). Afghan women take part in a literacy class at the Organisation of Promoting Afghan Women's Capabilities (OPAWC) center in Kabul, Afghanistan, March 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Zohra Bensemra).

Early this summer, a group of congresswomen returned from a visit to Afghanistan. Their takeaway: “Women are now participants—and in many cases, leaders—in a society that once systematically subjugated them.” Indeed, women in Afghanistan have made great strides in recent years, but many challenges remain—especially in the face of imminent U.S. withdrawal from the country.

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