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Development Channel

Issues and innovations in global economic development

Democracy in Development: The Slow Shift from Cash Economies to Mobile Banking

by Isobel Coleman Tuesday, July 31, 2012
A man leaves an M-Pesa booth after a transaction in Nairobi, Kenya on May 12, 2009 (Noor Khamis/Courtesy Reuters). A man leaves an M-Pesa booth after a transaction in Nairobi, Kenya on May 12, 2009 (Noor Khamis/Courtesy Reuters).

Today on my blog, I discuss how mobile money stands to reduce poverty by making financial services more inclusive and accessible–as well as the obstacles to fulfilling this possibility. As I write: Read more »

New from CFR: Laurie Garrett on the International AIDS Conference

by Development Channel Staff Friday, July 27, 2012
Stephanie Laster of Atlanta, Georgia, tends to the quilts which memorialize her mother, son, uncle, and aunt, all AIDS victims, at the AIDS Memorial Quilt on the National Mall in Washington, DC, July 24, 2012. Stephanie Laster of Atlanta, Georgia, tends to the quilts which memorialize her mother, son, uncle, and aunt, all AIDS victims, at the AIDS Memorial Quilt on the National Mall in Washington, DC, July 24, 2012.

CFR Senior Fellow Laurie Garrett offers her perspective on this week’s International AIDS Conference and the fight against AIDS in a CFR.org interview and on her blog. She analyzes the state of efforts to combat the epidemic and the question of whether “the end of AIDS is attainable.” As she says on the blog: Read more »

Question of the Week: China in Africa Part III

by Development Channel Staff Wednesday, July 25, 2012
South African President Jacob Zuma (L) shakes hands with his Chinese counterpart Hu Jintao before a group photo session for the Fifth Ministerial Conference of the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) in Beijing on July 19, 2012 (Andy Wongl/Courtesy Reuters). South African President Jacob Zuma (L) shakes hands with his Chinese counterpart Hu Jintao before a group photo session for the Fifth Ministerial Conference of the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) in Beijing on July 19, 2012 (Andy Wongl/Courtesy Reuters).

This is the third Question of the Week post about Chinese involvement in Africa. Last week, we focused on the debate of whether Africa or China itself benefits more from Chinese aid. The week before that, we discussed the challenges of measuring China’s aid to Africa and the country’s South-South aid philosophy. This week, we look at the benefits and drawbacks of Chinese health aid to Africa.  

Read more »

Emerging Voices: Stefanos Zenios and Lyn Denend on Low-Cost Healthcare Innovations

by Guest Blogger for Isobel Coleman Monday, July 23, 2012
Women visit a clinic at Sinza Health Centre in Tanzania's capital Dar es Salaam, May 2, 2011 (Emmanuel Kwitema/Courtesy Reuters). Women visit a clinic at Sinza Health Centre in Tanzania's capital Dar es Salaam, May 2, 2011 (Emmanuel Kwitema/Courtesy Reuters).

Emerging Voices features regular contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Stefanos Zenios, who is the Charles A. Holloway Professor of Operations, Information, and Technology and Professor of Health Care Management at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, and Lyn Denend, Director of the Program in Healthcare Innovation at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. They discuss two attempts to bring cost-effective health technologies to developing countries and the role of diverse stakeholders in facilitating—or hindering—their implementation.

Read more »

Democracy in Development: An Update on Mobile Technology in Development

by Isobel Coleman Friday, July 20, 2012
A vendor hawks second-hand mobile phones at the sprawling Kibera slum, one of the largest and poorest slums in Africa, near Kenya's capital Nairobi on August 26, 2011 (Noor Khamis/Courtesy Reuters).A vendor hawks second-hand mobile phones at the sprawling Kibera slum, one of the largest and poorest slums in Africa, near Kenya's capital Nairobi on August 26, 2011 (Noor Khamis/Courtesy Reuters). A vendor hawks second-hand mobile phones at the sprawling Kibera slum, one of the largest and poorest slums in Africa, near Kenya's capital Nairobi on August 26, 2011 (Noor Khamis/Courtesy Reuters).

This week on my blog, I featured a two-part series on mobile technology in the developing world. On Tuesday, I wrote about how mobile phones are enabling people in the developing world to access banking services and obtain life insurance. On Thursday, I discussed how mobile technology helps NGOs extend resources and aid to those in need—and how it helps evaluate the impact of these projects. As I write in Tuesday’s post: Read more »

New from CFR: John Campbell on South Africa’s HIV/AIDS Past

by Development Channel Staff Thursday, July 19, 2012
Anti-retroviral (ARV) drugs sit on a shelf in the pharmacy at a clinic in Cape Town's Khayelitsha township on February 15, 2010 (Finbarr O'Reilly/Courtesy Reuters). Anti-retroviral (ARV) drugs sit on a shelf in the pharmacy at a clinic in Cape Town's Khayelitsha township on February 15, 2010 (Finbarr O'Reilly/Courtesy Reuters).

In a post yesterday on his blog, CFR Senior Fellow John Campbell wrote about South Africa’s history of combating HIV/AIDS. He focuses on Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, who was just appointed chairperson of the African Union Commission after serving as South Africa’s health and then foreign minister under administrations that took questionable approaches to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. As Campbell writes:

Read more »

The Complex Ties Among Poverty, Development, and Security

by Terra Lawson-Remer Thursday, July 19, 2012
Afghan farmers work at a poppy field in Jalalabad province, May 5, 2012 (Parwiz Parwiz/Courtesy Reuters). Afghan farmers work at a poppy field in Jalalabad province, May 5, 2012 (Parwiz Parwiz/Courtesy Reuters).

Over the past decade a new conventional wisdom has emerged that security and development are mutually reinforcing, and that long-term security is not possible without reducing poverty and promoting economic development.  This implies that economic development in unstable regions that pose potential threats to U.S. security should be a key pillar of U.S. foreign policy, a viewpoint embraced by top officials in the Obama Administration. Read more »

Question of the Week: China in Africa Part II

by Development Channel Staff Wednesday, July 18, 2012
China's President Hu Jintao (L) and his Tanzanian counterpart Jakaya Kikwete wave to a crowd upon their arrival at the State House in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on February 15, 2009 (Courtesy Reuters). China's President Hu Jintao (L) and his Tanzanian counterpart Jakaya Kikwete wave to a crowd upon their arrival at the State House in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on February 15, 2009 (Courtesy Reuters).

Is Chinese aid and investment a positive force for development in Africa?

This is the second Question of the Week post about Chinese involvement in Africa. Last week, we focused on China’s South-South philosophy and issues involved in measuring its aid and investment. This week, we examine the contentious debate on whether China’s aid benefits Africa and its people—or simply China itself.

Read more »

Democracy in Development: New Partnerships for Mobile Banking in the Developing World

by Isobel Coleman Monday, July 16, 2012
A man scrolls through his mobile phone to carry out a transaction via M-Pesa in Nairobi, Kenya on May 12, 2009 (Noor Khamis/Courtesy Reuters). A man scrolls through his mobile phone to carry out a transaction via M-Pesa in Nairobi, Kenya on May 12, 2009 (Noor Khamis/Courtesy Reuters).

Last week on my blog, Democracy in Development, I discussed how two major financial players, Visa and Citi, are becoming involved with mobile banking in developing countries. Their participation could play a crucial role in extending financial services to the world’s “unbanked” population. As I conclude: Read more »

New from CFR: Laurie Garrett on U.S. Global Health Arrangements

by Development Channel Staff Friday, July 13, 2012
President Barack Obama greets a baby as he visits a hospital in Accra, Ghana on July 11, 2009 (Jason Reed/Courtesy Reuters). President Barack Obama greets a baby as he visits a hospital in Accra, Ghana on July 11, 2009 (Jason Reed/Courtesy Reuters).

In a recent post on her blog, Laurie Garrett, CFR senior fellow for global health, discussed historical and ongoing changes in the U.S. government’s global health bureaucracy, focusing on the impending closure of the State Department’s Global Health Initiative office. As Garrett writes: Read more »