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Development Channel

Issues and innovations in global economic development

New from CFR: John Campbell on Mali and Nigeria

by Development Channel Staff Thursday, August 30, 2012
Refugee camp officials transport tents on a donkey-driven cart in the Mbera refugee camp, about 40 km (25 miles) from the border with Mali, May 24, 2012 (Joe Penney/Courtesy Reuters). Refugee camp officials transport tents on a donkey-driven cart in the Mbera refugee camp, about 40 km (25 miles) from the border with Mali, May 24, 2012 (Joe Penney/Courtesy Reuters).

This week on his blog, CFR Senior Fellow John Campbell discussed the humanitarian crisis in Mali and polio in Nigeria. Writing on Mali, he took stock of malnutrition and displacement, along with the international response: Read more »

Gender Equality Matters for Development Outcomes

by Terra Lawson-Remer Tuesday, August 21, 2012
A mother assists her daughter on her first day of school in Manila, Philippines on June 15, 2010 (Romeo Ranoco/Courtesy Reuters). A mother assists her daughter on her first day of school in Manila, Philippines on June 15, 2010 (Romeo Ranoco/Courtesy Reuters).

A careful look at the data reveals that societies with greater gender equality achieve higher levels of social and economic rights fulfillment for all members.

Improving gender equity in itself may be a goal with clear, intrinsic value. However, a substantial body of research now suggests that gender equity and the achievement of other development goals, such as health, education, social and economic rights fulfillment, and even growth, are inseparable. Read more »

Emerging Voices: Glencorse on Higher Education in Liberia

by Guest Blogger for Isobel Coleman Monday, August 20, 2012
The Liberian capital, Monrovia, October 2011 (Luc Gnago/Courtesy Reuters). The Liberian capital, Monrovia, October 2011 (Luc Gnago/Courtesy Reuters).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Blair Glencorse, Founder and Executive Director of the Accountability Lab. He analyzes the challenges of integrity and accountability in Liberia’s colleges and universities, arguing that failures in higher education threaten the country’s progress toward peace and development. You can follow Glencorse on his blog and on Twitter at @blairglencorse. Read more »

Democracy in Development: Food Insecurity in Malawi

by Isobel Coleman Friday, August 17, 2012
A Malawian woman tends dry fields in Thyolo district, some 70 km (44 miles) from the commercial capital Blantyre on October 6, 2005 (Courtesy Reuters). A Malawian woman tends dry fields in Thyolo district, some 70 km (44 miles) from the commercial capital Blantyre on October 6, 2005 (Courtesy Reuters).

Yesterday, I wrote on my blog, Democracy in Development, about the struggle to boost agricultural production and food security in Malawi. As I noted: Read more »

New from CFR: John Campbell on Measuring South Africa’s Middle Class

by Development Channel Staff Tuesday, August 14, 2012
A worker walks near a row of cars at Nissan's manufacturing plant in Rosslyn, outside Pretoria, South Africa on September 11, 2009 (Siphiwe Sibeko/Courtesy Reuters). A worker walks near a row of cars at Nissan's manufacturing plant in Rosslyn, outside Pretoria, South Africa on September 11, 2009 (Siphiwe Sibeko/Courtesy Reuters).

On his blog yesterday, CFR Senior Fellow John Campbell discussed a proposed new way to gauge the size of the middle class: measure the number of cars. He evaluates the measure in the context of South Africa, writing: Read more »

Question of the Week: Are Randomized Controlled Trials a Good Way to Evaluate Development Projects?

by Development Channel Staff Friday, August 10, 2012
A student sits in her classroom in Sajiloni Primary School in the semi-arid Kajiado County, south of Kenya's capital Nairobi, June 12, 2012. With help from German Agro Action, the school was able to build a sustainable water tank, freeing students from the task of fetching water and allowing them to spend more time on their homework and improving their results, according to a deputy headmaster (Noor Khamis/Courtesy Reuters). A student sits in her classroom in Sajiloni Primary School in the semi-arid Kajiado County, south of Kenya's capital Nairobi, June 12, 2012. With help from German Agro Action, the school was able to build a sustainable water tank, freeing students from the task of fetching water and allowing them to spend more time on their homework and improving their results, according to a deputy headmaster (Noor Khamis/Courtesy Reuters).

Question of the Week posts review important questions and controversies in global development by providing background information and links to a full spectrum of analysis and opinion. Today’s post tackles the debate over randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which have emerged as an important tool for measuring the success of development interventions.

Read more »

Battling Africa’s Resource Curse

by Terra Lawson-Remer Thursday, August 9, 2012
Artisanal diamond miners work at Tumbodu, north of the town of Koidu in eastern Sierra Leone, March 3, 2012 (Simon Akam/Courtesy Reuters). Artisanal diamond miners work at Tumbodu, north of the town of Koidu in eastern Sierra Leone, March 3, 2012 (Simon Akam/Courtesy Reuters).

In an article in this month’s Africa in Fact, Joshua Greenstein and I proposed measures that could help direct Africa’s natural resource wealth into investments for development—instead of into the pockets of corrupt officials. We argue that African governments, donors, multilateral institutions, the extractive industry, banks, and civil society all have roles to play in boosting transparency and accountability, and we offer policy prescriptions on how the challenge can be addressed. As the article concludes: Read more »

Democracy in Development: Food Security and Innovations for Africa’s Agriculture

by Isobel Coleman Wednesday, August 8, 2012
A farmer uses one of KickStart's pumps to irrigate farmland in Africa (Courtesy KickStart). A farmer uses one of KickStart's pumps to irrigate farmland in Africa (Courtesy KickStart).

Yesterday on my blog, I wrote about Africa’s unrealized agricultural potential and the efforts of KickStart, a non-profit that is working to boost yields through low-cost irrigation technology. As I write: Read more »

Emerging Voices: Oshry, Bradlow, Miller, and Hansen on Technology for Agriculture in Africa

by Guest Blogger for Isobel Coleman Tuesday, August 7, 2012
This graph shows the impact of 1 percent GDP growth in the agricultural and non-agricultural sectors on the incomes of people in different income deciles. The study, based on data from 42 countries from 1981 to 2003, measures people's expenditures, which are typically correlated with income. (Ligon and Sadoulet, "Estimating the Effects of Aggregate Agricultural Growth on the Distribution of Expenditures." Background paper for the World Development Report 2008.) This graph shows the impact of 1 percent GDP growth in the agricultural and non-agricultural sectors on the incomes of people in different income deciles. The study, based on data from 42 countries from 1981 to 2003, measures people's expenditures, which are typically correlated with income. (Ligon and Sadoulet, "Estimating the Effects of Aggregate Agricultural Growth on the Distribution of Expenditures." Background paper for the World Development Report 2008.)

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Nadia Oshry, Adam Bradlow, Robin Miller, and Angela R. Hansen of Dalberg Global Development Advisors. Oshry, Bradlow, and Miller are based in Dalberg’s Johannesburg office; Hansen is the director of the Johannesburg office and leads the firm’s Agriculture and Food Security practice. In the article, they evaluate the potential of information and communications technology to boost agricultural production and the incomes of small-scale farmers in Africa. Read more »

New from CFR: Yanzhong Huang on the WHO

by Development Channel Staff Monday, August 6, 2012
A health worker gets a single dose of influenza vaccine in Mandaluyong City in the Philippines on April 26, 2010. At least 1.9 million doses of Influenza A (H1N1) vaccines donated by the World Health Organization (WHO) will be used to vaccinate more than 36,000 health workers, as part of the country's response to the pandemic. A health worker gets a single dose of influenza vaccine in Mandaluyong City in the Philippines on April 26, 2010. At least 1.9 million doses of Influenza A (H1N1) vaccines donated by the World Health Organization (WHO) will be used to vaccinate more than 36,000 health workers, as part of the country's response to the pandemic.

Writing last week in the New York Times International Weekly, CFR Senior Fellow Yanzhong Huang analyzed the World Health Organization’s position in the changing field of global health. Even as the WHO struggles to tackle both longstanding and novel health threats, Huang wrote, it is attracting few resources from the world’s rising powers: Read more »