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Development Channel

Issues and innovations in global economic development

White House Summit Embraces Women’s Rights to Counter Violent Extremism

by Catherine Powell Wednesday, February 25, 2015
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during the White House Summit on Countering Violent Extremism in Washington, DC, February 2015 (Courtesy Joshua Roberts/Reuters). U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during the White House Summit on Countering Violent Extremism in Washington, DC, February 2015 (Courtesy Joshua Roberts/Reuters).

Last week, the White House sponsored an international summit on strategies to counter violent extremism (CVE), focusing on groups such as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and al-Qaeda. Among the strategies suggested to mitigate radicalization, President Obama listed an increased emphasis on human rights and democracy: “That means free elections where people can choose their own future, and independent judiciaries that uphold the rule of law, and police and security forces that respect human rights, and free speech and freedom for civil society groups.”

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Five Ways to Engage the Private Sector in Countering Violent Extremism

by Guest Blogger for Gayle Tzemach Lemmon Monday, February 23, 2015
A masked man speaking in what is believed to be a North American accent in a video released by Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) militants in September 2014 is pictured in this still frame from video obtained by Reuters (Courtesy Reuters/FBI/Handout via Reuters). A masked man speaking in what is believed to be a North American accent in a video released by Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) militants in September 2014 is pictured in this still frame from video obtained by Reuters (Courtesy Reuters/FBI/Handout via Reuters).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Dr. Khalid Koser, executive director of the Global Community Engagement and Resilience Fund (GCERF) and a nonresident senior fellow in foreign policy at the Brookings Institution.

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UN Reports Rising Attacks on Girls’ Education

by Catherine Powell Friday, February 20, 2015
A girl reads from the board in a home-based school in Kabul, Afghanistan, December 2001 (Courtsey Damir Sagolj/Reuters). A girl reads from the board in a home-based school in Kabul, Afghanistan, December 2001 (Courtsey Damir Sagolj/Reuters).

Attacks on girls’ schools and female students have appeared in the headlines regularly in recent years, from the abduction of schoolgirls in Chibok, Nigeria, by Boko Haram to the assassination attempt on student and girls’ education activist Malala Yousafzai.

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Podcast: What the Ebola Outbreak Says About Global Health Governance

by Guest Blogger for Gayle Tzemach Lemmon Tuesday, February 17, 2015
A health worker demonstrates putting on protective gear in a Red Cross facility in the town of Koidu, Kono district in Eastern Sierra Leone, December 2014 (Courtesy Baz Ratner/Reuters). A health worker demonstrates putting on protective gear in a Red Cross facility in the town of Koidu, Kono district in Eastern Sierra Leone, December 2014 (Courtesy Baz Ratner/Reuters).

This guest post is from my colleague, Yanzhong Huang, a senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations.

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Police Corruption: A Threat to Afghan Stability, a Threat to Afghan Women

by Catherine Powell Thursday, February 12, 2015
A policeman stands in front of a car window, which has been hit by a bullet, after clashes with protesters in Kabul, Afghanistan, January 31, 2015 (Courtesy Mohammad Ismail/Reuters). A policeman stands in front of a car window, which has been hit by a bullet, after clashes with protesters in Kabul, Afghanistan, January 31, 2015 (Courtesy Mohammad Ismail/Reuters).

This week, the New York Times reported that 32 officers of the Afghan National Police (ANP) in the Kunduz province are under suspicion in an ongoing investigation for corruption and ties to the Taliban. The report details harrowing crimes committed by police in Kunduz, including the kidnapping of children and rape of the citizens they are meant to protect.

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The Root of India’s Domestic Violence and Son Preference

by Hannah Chartoff Monday, February 2, 2015
A schoolgirl reads from a textbook at an open-air school in New Delhi, India, November 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Anindito Mukherjee). A schoolgirl reads from a textbook at an open-air school in New Delhi, India, November 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Anindito Mukherjee).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Hannah Chartoff, a research associate at the Council on Foreign Relations.

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Women’s Rights in Saudi Arabia After King Abdullah

by Catherine Powell Monday, January 26, 2015
A woman drives a car in October 2013 in Saudi Arabia, the only country in the world where women are barred from driving. Saudi female activists are campaigning to change this rule (Courtesy Reuters/Faisal Al Nasser). A woman drives a car in October 2013 in Saudi Arabia, the only country in the world where women are barred from driving. Saudi female activists are campaigning to change this rule (Courtesy Reuters/Faisal Al Nasser).

The death of Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz raises important questions about the future of the kingdom, including issues that have ripple effects around the world such as regional relations, counterterrorism strategy, and international oil pricing. With the transition of power to King Salman, another question emerges: what does the future hold for Saudi women’s rights?

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Leveraging Tech Innovations in Development

by Shannon K. O'Neil Friday, January 23, 2015
Flood victims show their ID cards to receive food rations at a distribution centre in Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province August 25, 2010 (Courtesy Reuters/Reinhard Krause). Flood victims show their ID cards to receive food rations at a distribution centre in Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province August 25, 2010 (Courtesy Reuters/Reinhard Krause).

Over the past decade, technology has begun to revolutionize industries ranging from education and healthcare to financial services and commerce. These transformations are not limited to the developed world – in emerging economies rapid mobile technology proliferation and internet penetration have had profound and unforeseen effects, including expanding financial inclusion through mobile banking services and facilitating employment through online and mobile job platforms.

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John Kerry and Pakistani Counterparts Must Look Beyond a Narrow Terror Framework

by Catherine Powell Thursday, January 22, 2015
Girls carry their school bags as they walk along a road while heading to their school after it reopened in Peshawar, Pakistan, on January 12, 2015 (Courtesy Reuters/Khuram Parvez). Girls carry their school bags as they walk along a road while heading to their school after it reopened in Peshawar, Pakistan, on January 12, 2015 (Courtesy Reuters/Khuram Parvez).

As Pakistan continues to reel from December’s horrific school attack, its government has initiated a crackdown on terror across the nation and instituted new security measures at schools. Last week, the Army Public School in Peshawar—site of the massacre that left over 150 dead—was reopened to students.

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Stand by Her: Afghan Men as Advocates for Women

by Guest Blogger for Catherine Powell Wednesday, January 14, 2015
Afghan children play on the outskirts of Jalalabad province, May 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/ Parwiz). Afghan children play on the outskirts of Jalalabad province, May 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/ Parwiz).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Kristen Cordell, gender advisor for the Office of Afghanistan and Pakistan Affairs at USAID.  

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