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Issues and innovations in global economic development

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New From CFR: Joshua Kurlantzick on ASEAN Economic Growth

by Development Channel Staff
Myanmar pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi gives a speech at the ASEAN 100 Leadership Forum 2012 at Sedona Hotel in Yangon on December 6, 2012 (Courtesy Reuters). Myanmar pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi gives a speech at the ASEAN 100 Leadership Forum 2012 at Sedona Hotel in Yangon on December 6, 2012 (Courtesy Reuters).

This week on CFR’s Asia Unbound blog, CFR fellow Joshua Kurlantzick analyzes a new article from the Asia Sentinel about ASEAN countries’ exceptional economic growth. Read more »

New From CFR: Yanzhong Huang on the SARS Epidemic, Ten Years Later

by Development Channel Staff
Security officers in protective suits, to prevent themselves from catching the pneumonia-like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), guard the entrance of a special isolation camp, housing some 200 of the more than 400 residents evacuated from Amoy Gardens in Hong Kong on April 2, 2003 (Bobby Yip/Courtesy Reuters). Security officers in protective suits, to prevent themselves from catching the pneumonia-like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), guard the entrance of a special isolation camp, housing some 200 of the more than 400 residents evacuated from Amoy Gardens in Hong Kong on April 2, 2003 (Bobby Yip/Courtesy Reuters).

This week on the Asia Unbound blog, CFR senior fellow Yanzhong Huang debunked five myths about the 2002-03 SARS epidemic, including the idea that “Poor or failed states pose a bigger infectious disease threat to the international community than stronger developing countries.” Huang asserts that this is “not necessarily” the case, arguing, among other reasons: Read more »

Question of the Week: Inequality

by Development Channel Staff
Clothes are seen hanging outside a bus which has been converted into a dwelling for Lu Changshan and his wife, near newly-constructed residential buildings in Hefei, Anhui province on November 12, 2012 (Jianan Lu/Courtesy Reuters). Clothes are seen hanging outside a bus which has been converted into a dwelling for Lu Changshan and his wife near newly-constructed residential buildings in Hefei, Anhui province in China on November 12, 2012 (Jianan Lu/Courtesy Reuters).

Where is global income inequality headed?  

Question of the Week posts review important questions and controversies in global development by providing background information and links to a full spectrum of analysis and opinion. Today’s post discusses global trends in income inequality.

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New From CFR: Joshua Kurlantzick on Indonesia’s Infrastructure and Growth

by Development Channel Staff
PT Pertamina workers repair an old oil well for reactivation in Tarakan, Indonesia's East Kalimantan province, on February 9, 2011 (Beawiharta Beawiharta/Courtesy Reuters). PT Pertamina workers repair an old oil well for reactivation in Tarakan, Indonesia's East Kalimantan province, on February 9, 2011 (Beawiharta Beawiharta/Courtesy Reuters).

Yesterday on CFR’s Asia Unbound blog, CFR fellow Joshua Kurlantzick suggested that resource nationalism could threaten Indonesia’s economic development. As he argues: Read more »

New From CFR: Foreign Affairs on Poverty in India

by Development Channel Staff
High rise residential buildings are seen behind a slum in Mumbai on July 20, 2010 (Danish Siddiqui/Courtesy Reuters. High rise residential buildings are seen behind a slum in Mumbai on July 20, 2010 (Danish Siddiqui/Courtesy Reuters).

A review by Andrew Nathan in the November/December Foreign Affairs examines two books on poverty reduction in India, home to some 35 percent of the world’s poorest people. The first volume is Poverty Amid Plenty in the New India by Atul Kohli. As Nathan writes: Read more »

The Paradox of Property Rights and Economic Development

by Terra Lawson-Remer
Villagers shout for their farms and villages during protests against the Lebadaung copper mine project in Sarlingyi township in Myanmar on September 12, 2012 (Soe Zeya Tun/Courtesy Reuters). Villagers shout for their farms and villages during protests against the Lebadaung copper mine project in Sarlingyi township in Myanmar on September 12, 2012 (Soe Zeya Tun/Courtesy Reuters).

Recent weeks have seen simmering property rights conflicts around the world: Burmese citizens marching in protest against the government’s seizure of their lands for a hotel zone; Vietnamese villagers contesting the confiscation of their land for an EcoPark satellite city project; and violent clashes breaking out in Panama City over a controversial law allowing the sale of state-owned land in the port city of Colón—Latin America’s largest duty-free zone.

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Emerging Voices: Tae Yoo on Broadband Investment in Afghanistan

by Guest Blogger for Isobel Coleman
Afghan women work at Aghanistan's first all-female Internet cafe in Kabul on March 8, 2012 (Mohammad Ismail/Courtesy Reuters). Afghan women work at Aghanistan's first all-female Internet cafe in Kabul on March 8, 2012 (Mohammad Ismail/Courtesy Reuters).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Tae Yoo, senior vice president of corporate affairs at Cisco. She discusses the importance of developing broadband infrastructure in Afghanistan and Cisco’s contributions to this effort.

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Democracy in Development: Bangladeshi Politics and the Grameen Bank’s Uncertain Future

by Isobel Coleman
Bangladeshi Nobel laureate Muhammad Yunus arrives in court for a hearing in Dhaka, Bangladesh, March 7, 2011 (Andrew Biraj/Courtesy Reuters). Bangladeshi Nobel laureate Muhammad Yunus arrives in court for a hearing in Dhaka, Bangladesh, March 7, 2011 (Andrew Biraj/Courtesy Reuters).

Microfinance undoubtedly figures among the most important development innovations in the past several decades. Beginning in the 1970s, microfinance pioneers promoted the radical idea that it was possible to unlock the talents and energies of the poor themselves by providing them with small loans without collateral – a concept dismissed by traditional financial institutions. Over the years, as the industry has grown and evolved,  it has also attracted substantial critical attention, including in books like David Roodman’s Due Diligence: An Impertinent Inquiry into Microfinance. Today, as debates over regulation and best practices continue, microfinance is regarded as one tool for poverty reduction, women’s empowerment, and financial inclusion, but far from a silver bullet for development. Read more »

Question of the Week: China in Africa Part III

by Development Channel Staff
South African President Jacob Zuma (L) shakes hands with his Chinese counterpart Hu Jintao before a group photo session for the Fifth Ministerial Conference of the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) in Beijing on July 19, 2012 (Andy Wongl/Courtesy Reuters). South African President Jacob Zuma (L) shakes hands with his Chinese counterpart Hu Jintao before a group photo session for the Fifth Ministerial Conference of the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) in Beijing on July 19, 2012 (Andy Wongl/Courtesy Reuters).

This is the third Question of the Week post about Chinese involvement in Africa. Last week, we focused on the debate of whether Africa or China itself benefits more from Chinese aid. The week before that, we discussed the challenges of measuring China’s aid to Africa and the country’s South-South aid philosophy. This week, we look at the benefits and drawbacks of Chinese health aid to Africa.  

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Question of the Week: China in Africa Part II

by Development Channel Staff
China's President Hu Jintao (L) and his Tanzanian counterpart Jakaya Kikwete wave to a crowd upon their arrival at the State House in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on February 15, 2009 (Courtesy Reuters). China's President Hu Jintao (L) and his Tanzanian counterpart Jakaya Kikwete wave to a crowd upon their arrival at the State House in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on February 15, 2009 (Courtesy Reuters).

Is Chinese aid and investment a positive force for development in Africa?

This is the second Question of the Week post about Chinese involvement in Africa. Last week, we focused on China’s South-South philosophy and issues involved in measuring its aid and investment. This week, we examine the contentious debate on whether China’s aid benefits Africa and its people—or simply China itself.

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