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Showing posts for "Economic Growth"

The Future of Global Supply Chains: Workshop Report

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Shipping containers sit at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, California in this aerial photo taken February 6, 2015 (Reuters/Bob Riha, Jr.) Shipping containers sit at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, California in this aerial photo taken February 6, 2015 (Reuters/Bob Riha, Jr.)

Commerce has fundamentally changed over the past thirty years. Intermediate goods—or parts of products traded through global supply chains—now account for 70 percent of all trade. The Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy program hosted a workshop in May to explore the evolution of global supply chains, the risks they face, and how U.S. policies help or hinder the country’s competitiveness. The workshop included current and former government officials, supply chain experts, corporate representatives, and finance specialists.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: U.S. Corruption Ruling, China’s Antigraft Drive, Panama Canal Expands

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Former Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell is trailed by reporters as he departs after his appeal of his 2014 corruption conviction was heard at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, U.S. April 27, 2016. The U.S. Supreme Court on June 27, 2016 threw out McDonnell's corruption convictions in a ruling that could hem in federal prosecutors as they go after bribery charges against other politicians (Reuters/Jonathan Ernst). Former Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell is trailed by reporters as he departs after his appeal of his 2014 corruption conviction was heard at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, U.S. April 27, 2016. The U.S. Supreme Court on June 27, 2016 threw out McDonnell's corruption convictions in a ruling that could hem in federal prosecutors as they go after bribery charges against other politicians (Reuters/Jonathan Ernst).

Supreme Court Rules on Corruption
The U.S. Supreme Court overturned former Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell’s bribery conviction for accepting over $175,000 worth of gifts and loans—including a Rolex watch, designer clothes, and luxury getaways—allegedly in return for favorable business treatment. The court said this did not count as an “official act” of bribery under U.S. law, raising the bar for federal prosecutions of public sector corruption. States can help fill the gap, as Virginia did in the wake of the scandal, setting a straightforward $100 annual cap on gifts from lobbyists and other individuals or businesses angling for government deals or support. Other states ban or set strict gift limits. In Florida, lobbyists (or those who hire them) cannot give more than a flower arrangement; in California, officials cannot accept anything valued over $250. Several states prohibit gifts with “intent to influence”—a hard case to prove. Check out your jurisdiction here.

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Five Questions with Geraldine Knatz: The Panama Canal Expansion and the Evolution of Global Trade

by Guest Blogger for Shannon K. O'Neil
People wave at a Chinese COSCO container vessel, as it arrives to Cocoli locks after crossing the Panama Canal to the Pacific side, during its first ceremonial transit of the new Panama Canal expansion project in Cocoli on the outskirts of Panama City, Panama June 26, 2016 (Reuters/Carlos Jasso). People wave at a Chinese COSCO container vessel, as it arrives to Cocoli locks after crossing the Panama Canal to the Pacific side, during its first ceremonial transit of the new Panama Canal expansion project in Cocoli on the outskirts of Panama City, Panama June 26, 2016 (Reuters/Carlos Jasso).

As the first ship goes through the expanded Panama Canal, the Development Channel sat down with Geraldine Knatz, former director of the Port of Los Angeles and now a professor of policy and engineering at the University of Southern California’s Price School of Public Policy. Dr. Knatz talked about changes in the shipping industry, trends affecting U.S. ports, and what the canal expansion will mean for trade globally.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Ericsson Corruption Probes, EU Spurs Antigraft Action, Modi Courts FDI

by Shannon K. O'Neil
A banner reading "Corruption kills" is placed among candles, lit in memoriam of more than 50 people killed when a fire erupted during a rock concert in a night club in Bucharest, at a memorial in Timisoara, Romania in this November 1, 2015 picture. Big public demonstrations following a fire in a Bucharest nightclub in which more than 50 people died reflect growing anger at a culture of official graft in one of Europe's most corrupt countries (Reuters/Inquam Photos). A banner reading "Corruption kills" is placed among candles, lit in memoriam of more than 50 people killed when a fire erupted during a rock concert in a night club in Bucharest, at a memorial in Timisoara, Romania in this November 1, 2015 picture. Big public demonstrations following a fire in a Bucharest nightclub in which more than 50 people died reflect growing anger at a culture of official graft in one of Europe's most corrupt countries (Reuters/Inquam Photos).

Corruption Probes Spook Ericsson Investors
Both U.S. and Greek authorities are taking on Ericsson AB, one of the world’s biggest telecoms companies, for alleged corruption. The United States is investigating its operations in both China and Romania for potential Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) violations. The Greeks summoned seven current and former executives over whether the Swedish multinational bribed government officials to win a $597 million defense contract in 1999. These inquires come at a time when the company faces stiff competition, declining sales, and falling share prices. Ericsson is now trying to ease investors’ concerns, hoping the revelations do not get worse.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Protectionism Rises, Mexico Anticorruption Bill Delayed, How Corruption Affects Business

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Protesters demonstrate against Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) free trade agreement ahead of U.S. President Barack Obama's visit in Hannover, Germany April 23, 2016 (Reuters/Kai Pfaffenbach). Protesters demonstrate against Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) free trade agreement ahead of U.S. President Barack Obama's visit in Hannover, Germany April 23, 2016 (Reuters/Kai Pfaffenbach).

Protectionism by the Numbers
It is not just anti-trade rhetoric spreading on both sides of the Atlantic; it is also policies. The Global Trade Alert, an online index that monitors trade policy, reports a rapid rise in protectionist measures worldwide since 2008. The database documents over 5,000 new barriers to trade, including import quotas, stricter rules for migrant workers, and local content requirements. The United States leads this turn toward protectionism, creating more than eighty new rules in the last year alone. These measures are one of the main causes slowing global trade.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Rana Plaza Anniversary, Press Freedom Declines, Haiti Election Troubles

by Shannon K. O'Neil
A relative holds up a picture of a garment worker in front of the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building (Reuters/Andrew Biraj). A relative holds up a picture of a garment worker in front of the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building (Reuters/Andrew Biraj).

Labor Standards Three Years After Rana Plaza
Three years after Bangladesh’s Rana Plaza garment factory collapse killed or injured over 3,000 people, labor rights remain tenuous. In the wake of the disaster apparel brands, suppliers, and the Bangladeshi government created the Alliance for Bangladesh Worker Safety, a partnership to improve conditions by setting standards and increasing inspections. The Alliance has worked with factories to build emergency exits, install fire hydrants, and rewire electrical systems. It has also blacklisted the worst offenders. Yet it only encompasses those operating under formal contracts. Over half of the nation’s 7,000 factories work in the informal economy. Here, the Bangladeshi government doesn’t enforce Alliance standards, leaving these workers vulnerable.

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Five Questions on Sustainable Investing With Morgan Stanley’s Audrey Choi

by Guest Blogger for Shannon K. O'Neil
A man fills a glass with water from a spring in Chiffa in Medea Governorate, Algeria (Reuters/Ramzi Boudina). A man fills a glass with water from a spring in Chiffa in Medea Governorate, Algeria (Reuters/Ramzi Boudina).

This post features a conversation with Audrey Choi, chief executive officer of Morgan Stanley’s Institute for Sustainable Investing and managing director of its Global Sustainable Finance Group. Choi talks about the evolving $20 trillion sector, including important U.S. policy changes and her thoughts on where sustainable investing is headed. Read more »

CSMD Spring Break Reading List

by Shannon K. O'Neil
People walk on the rock at the Trou aux Biches beach on the Indian Ocean island Mauritius (Reuters/Jacky Naegelen). People walk on the rock at the Trou aux Biches beach on the Indian Ocean island Mauritius (Reuters/Jacky Naegelen).

As Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy (CSMD) heads into spring break, here is what we will be reading.

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Tackling Climate Change Through Agriculture

by Guest Blogger for Shannon K. O'Neil
A farmer burns a paddy field in Thailand's Nakhonsawan province, north of Bangkok, Thailand, August 14, 2015 (Reuters/Chaiwat Subprasom). A farmer burns a paddy field in Thailand's Nakhonsawan province, north of Bangkok, Thailand, August 14, 2015 (Reuters/Chaiwat Subprasom).

Emerging Voices highlights new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges from contributing scholars and practitioners. This post is from Dr. D. Michael Shafer, president and founder of Warm Heart Worldwide and professor emeritus of political science at Rutgers University. Warm Heart is a community-based development organization dedicated to building socially- and economically-sustainable communities in rural areas of northern Thailand.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Brazil’s Crisis Snowballs, Deferred Corruption Prosecutions, U.S. Bets on Cuba

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff (R) greets former president Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva during the appointment of Lula da Silva as chief of staff, at Planalto palace in Brasilia, Brazil (Reuters/Adriano Machado). Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff (R) greets former president Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva during the appointment of Lula da Silva as chief of staff, at Planalto palace in Brasilia, Brazil (Reuters/Adriano Machado).

Brazil’s Corruption Crisis Snowballs
Brazil’s corruption investigations expanded to encompass the former and current president. Federal police detained and questioned former President Luíz Inácio Lula da Silva (“Lula”) over whether he personally benefited from the Petrobras bribery scheme. São Paulo state prosecutors then separately filed to arrest him on money-laundering charges. In a plea bargain, Senator Delcídio do Amaral claimed current President Dilma Rousseff knew about Petrobras bid-rigging and tried to stop the criminal probe. Abroad, Argentine prosecutors are investigating if their own officials received kickbacks, and my colleague Matt Taylor predicts the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) could bring FCPA charges against Petrobras. And in what most perceive as a cynical move to defy justice, Lula joined Rousseff’s cabinet as chief of staff, removing him from the jurisdiction of both state and federal courts (only the Supreme Court can now try his case). As millions take to the streets in outrage, the political consequences may come more quickly than the legal ones.

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