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Showing posts for "Foreign Aid"

This Week in Markets and Democracy: African Progress, EU Transparency, Term Limits, Foreign Aid, and War Crimes

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Nepal's Prime Minister Sushil Koirala greets upon his arrival to take part in the International Conference of Nepal Reconstruction in Kathmandu, June 25, 2015. According to the local media report the government expects big aid pledge from the donors taking part in the conference for rebuilding Nepal after the earthquake. (Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters) Nepal's Prime Minister Sushil Koirala greets upon his arrival to take part in the International Conference of Nepal Reconstruction in Kathmandu, June 25, 2015. According to the local media report the government expects big aid pledge from the donors taking part in the conference for rebuilding Nepal after the earthquake. (Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters)

This post is part of the series, “This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each Friday, CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program, will highlight the week’s noteworthy events and articles.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Climate Finance, Aid, Anti-Corruption Tech, and the ICC

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Leaders of the AU stand during the opening of the 25th African Union summit in Johannesburg June 14, 2015. A South African court issued an interim order on Sunday preventing Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir leaving the country, where he was attending an African Union summit, until the judge hears an application calling for his arrest. (Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters) Leaders of the AU stand during the opening of the 25th African Union summit in Johannesburg June 14, 2015. A South African court issued an interim order on Sunday preventing Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir leaving the country, where he was attending an African Union summit, until the judge hears an application calling for his arrest. (Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters)

This is the fourth post of a new series on the Development Channel, “This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each Friday, CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program, will highlight the week’s noteworthy events and articles.

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Gender Equality and Smart U.S. Foreign Assistance

by Rachel Vogelstein
Women carry bricks on their back as they work at a brick factory in Bhaktapur, Nepal. (Courtesy Ahmad Masood/Reuters) Women carry bricks on their back as they work at a brick factory in Bhaktapur, Nepal, May 2015. (Courtesy Ahmad Masood/Reuters)

It has become axiomatic in international development that increasing economic opportunities for women contributes to economic growth. Organizations from the World Bank to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) have concluded that women’s participation in the economy is linked to poverty reduction and gross domestic product (GDP) growth. Today, the question is not whether women’s economic participation matters—rather, it is how to promote this goal most effectively.

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Expanding Private Sector Engagement in Developing Countries

by Guest Blogger for Shannon K. O'Neil
A construction worker takes measurements of roofing metal bars of a new hospital under construction in Hoima town, Uganda April 27, 2015 (Courtesy Reuters/James Akena). A construction worker takes measurements of roofing metal bars of a new hospital under construction in Hoima town, Uganda April 27, 2015 (Courtesy Reuters/James Akena).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners, highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Elizabeth Littlefield, president and chief executive officer of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, the U.S. governments development finance institution.

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India as Regional Power: Promoting Women’s Rights in Afghanistan

by Catherine Powell
India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi (L) speaks as Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani watches during the opening session of 18th South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) summit in Kathmandu, Nepal, on November 26, 2014 (Courtesy Narendra Shrestha/Pool/Reuters). India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi (L) speaks as Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani watches during the opening session of 18th South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) summit in Kathmandu, Nepal, on November 26, 2014 (Courtesy Narendra Shrestha/Pool/Reuters).

Last month’s decision by President Obama to extend the U.S. military presence in Afghanistan is an important step in securing the substantial American investment there. This extension—which is and should be temporary—is crucial to allow the Afghan government and security forces to build their capacity to maintain stability on the ground.

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Mr. Ghani Goes to Washington

by Catherine Powell
Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani (L) shakes hands with U.S. President Barack Obama after their joint news conference at the White House in Washington, DC, March 24, 2015 (Courtesy Jonathan Ernst/Reuters). Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani (L) shakes hands with U.S. President Barack Obama after their joint news conference at the White House in Washington, DC, March 24, 2015 (Courtesy Jonathan Ernst/Reuters).

This week, during the Afghan President Ashraf Ghani’s White House visit, U.S. President Barack Obama announced that he will delay the schedule for U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan and current troop levels will be maintained through the end of 2015. While I have reservations about the use of U.S. military power abroad more generally, a brief extension of the American military presence in Afghanistan makes sense to secure the substantial U.S. investment there.

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Leveraging Tech Innovations in Development

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Flood victims show their ID cards to receive food rations at a distribution centre in Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province August 25, 2010 (Courtesy Reuters/Reinhard Krause). Flood victims show their ID cards to receive food rations at a distribution centre in Muzaffargarh district of Punjab province August 25, 2010 (Courtesy Reuters/Reinhard Krause).

Over the past decade, technology has begun to revolutionize industries ranging from education and healthcare to financial services and commerce. These transformations are not limited to the developed world – in emerging economies rapid mobile technology proliferation and internet penetration have had profound and unforeseen effects, including expanding financial inclusion through mobile banking services and facilitating employment through online and mobile job platforms.

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Stand by Her: Afghan Men as Advocates for Women

by Guest Blogger for Catherine Powell
Afghan children play on the outskirts of Jalalabad province, May 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/ Parwiz). Afghan children play on the outskirts of Jalalabad province, May 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/ Parwiz).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Kristen Cordell, gender advisor for the Office of Afghanistan and Pakistan Affairs at USAID.  

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Viewing the U.S.–Afghan Bilateral Security Agreement Through a Gender Lens

by Catherine Powell
Afghan National Security Advisor Hanif Atmar and U.S. Ambassador James Cunningham sign the bilateral security agreement in Kabul, Afghanistan, September 30, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Mohammad Ismail). Afghan National Security Advisor Hanif Atmar and U.S. Ambassador James Cunningham sign the bilateral security agreement in Kabul, Afghanistan, September 30, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Mohammad Ismail).

After almost a year of stalemate, Afghanistan finally signed a renewed bilateral security agreement (BSA) with the United States last Tuesday. The document, which allows 9,800 U.S. troops and 2,000 NATO troops to remain in Afghanistan in a training and advisory capacity after the end of 2014, was approved by newly-minted Afghan President Ashraf Ghani. Read more »

How to Make Fuel Subsidy Reform Succeed

by Isobel Coleman
Anti-government protesters march during a demonstration to denounce fuel prices hikes in Sanaa, Yemen, August 4, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Khaled Abdullah). Anti-government protesters march during a demonstration to denounce fuel prices hikes in Sanaa, Yemen, August 4, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Khaled Abdullah).

A few weeks ago, Yemen’s government took the bold – some might say foolhardy – step of winding down a fuel subsidy program that was costing it billions of dollars. Overnight, fuel prices in the country nearly doubled, sparking violent riots. For average Yemenis, the sudden end of one of the few tangible benefits they get from their government is bitter indeed, especially since 54.5 percent of the population lives below the poverty line. It’s no surprise that thousands of protesters have taken to the streets. But the change in policy didn’t have to occur this way.

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