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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Sustainable Development Goals Adopted

by Shannon K. O'Neil
U.S. President Barack Obama addresses attendees during a plenary meeting of the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 2015 at the United Nations headquarters in Manhattan, New York September 27, 2015. More than 150 world leaders are expected to attend the UN Sustainable Development Summit from September 25-27, 2015 at United Nations in New York to formally adopt an ambitious new sustainable development agenda, a press statement by the U.N. stated (Reuters/Mike Segar). U.S. President Barack Obama addresses attendees during a plenary meeting of the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 2015 at the United Nations headquarters in Manhattan, New York September 27, 2015. More than 150 world leaders are expected to attend the UN Sustainable Development Summit from September 25-27, 2015 at United Nations in New York to formally adopt an ambitious new sustainable development agenda, a press statement by the U.N. stated (Reuters/Mike Segar).

The biggest achievement of the past week’s United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) in New York was the adoption of a new fifteen-year plan for global development. Replacing the soon-to-expire Millennium Development Goals, seventeen new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will guide UN and domestic development policies through 2030 with an ambitious, and some say overly idealistic agenda. Based on UN member and civil society input over a three-year process, the final set of SDGs aims to eliminate hunger, reduce inequality, promote shared economic growth, and “end poverty in all its forms everywhere.” President Obama, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, and Pope Francis all endorsed the new “global goals” during the three-day UN Sustainable Development Summit held in the run-up to UNGA. Here are two major takeaways from the summit:

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: U.S. Fights Corruption, Preventing Mass Atrocities, and More

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Ban Ki-moon, U.N. Secretary-General addresses a plenary meeting of the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 2015 at United Nations headquarters in Manhattan, New York, September 25, 2015. More than 150 world leaders are expected to attend the U.N. Sustainable Development Summit from September 25-27 at the United Nations in New York to formally adopt an ambitious new sustainable development agenda a press statement by the U.N. stated. (Soe Zeya Tun/Reuters). Ban Ki-moon, U.N. Secretary-General addresses a plenary meeting of the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 2015 at United Nations headquarters in Manhattan, New York, September 25, 2015. More than 150 world leaders are expected to attend the U.N. Sustainable Development Summit from September 25-27 at the United Nations in New York to formally adopt an ambitious new sustainable development agenda a press statement by the U.N. stated. (Soe Zeya Tun/Reuters).

CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy (CSMD) Program highlights noteworthy events and articles each Friday in “This Week in Markets and Democracy.” 

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: TPP’s Auto Delay, Cleaning Up Supply Chains, and International Anti-Corruption Conference

by Shannon K. O'Neil
An artisanal miner washes tin ore before it is bagged up and weighed, ready to be transported to the nearest major town for export in the Kalimbi tin mine near the small town of Nyabibwe, October 31, 2012. Eastern Congo has been mired in violence since the 1990s, as battles over ethnicity and resources saw neighbouring countries invade, armed groups spring up and the country's own army turning on the civilian population. A so-called "conflict-free tin initiative" seeking to revive the legal trade in minerals has been set up by UK based industry body ITRI, which is currently the only traceability programme operating in Rwanda, and Congo's more stable Katanga province. Now, with international backers including the U.S. and the Netherlands, a tagging project has been launched for the first time in the Kivus, the two Congolese provinces which have borne the brunt of the violence and have been the source of most of the region's conflict minerals (Jonny Hogg/Reuters). An artisanal miner washes tin ore before it is bagged up and weighed, ready to be transported to the nearest major town for export in the Kalimbi tin mine near the small town of Nyabibwe, October 31, 2012. Eastern Congo has been mired in violence since the 1990s, as battles over ethnicity and resources saw neighbouring countries invade, armed groups spring up and the country's own army turning on the civilian population. A so-called "conflict-free tin initiative" seeking to revive the legal trade in minerals has been set up by UK based industry body ITRI, which is currently the only traceability programme operating in Rwanda, and Congo's more stable Katanga province. Now, with international backers including the U.S. and the Netherlands, a tagging project has been launched for the first time in the Kivus, the two Congolese provinces which have borne the brunt of the violence and have been the source of most of the region's conflict minerals (Jonny Hogg/Reuters).

CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy (CSMD) Program highlights noteworthy events and articles each Friday in “This Week in Markets and Democracy.”

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Malaysia’s Corruption Scandal, Migration Crisis Threatens EU Political Unity, and More

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Protesters march at a rally organised by pro-democracy group "Bersih" (Clean) in Malaysia's capital city of Kuala Lumpur, August 29, 2015. Thousands of protesters gathered in Kuala Lumpur on Saturday for a two-day rally to demand the resignation of Prime Minister Najib Razak, bringing to the streets a political crisis over a multi-million-dollar payment made to an account under his name. The placards read, "Corruptor" and "We are not against prime minister, we just hate Najib" (Olivia Harris/Reuters). Protesters march at a rally organised by pro-democracy group "Bersih" (Clean) in Malaysia's capital city of Kuala Lumpur, August 29, 2015. Thousands of protesters gathered in Kuala Lumpur on Saturday for a two-day rally to demand the resignation of Prime Minister Najib Razak, bringing to the streets a political crisis over a multi-million-dollar payment made to an account under his name. The placards read, "Corruptor" and "We are not against prime minister, we just hate Najib" (Olivia Harris/Reuters).

CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy (CSMD) Program highlights noteworthy events and articles each Friday in “This Week in Markets and Democracy.”

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Tackling Corruption in Guatemala, Snap Elections, and AGOA’s Challenges

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Workers stand on top of bags of sugar at the Mumias sugar factory in western Kenya February 24, 2015. In the sugar cane fields of western Kenya, farmers complain that falling prices mean they can barely make ends meet. Yet rival African producers can still offer cheaper supplies. With much of the production coming from small rain-fed plots rather than large irrigated plantations, costs are much higher than Kenya's competitors (Reuters/Thomas Mukoya). Workers stand on top of bags of sugar at the Mumias sugar factory in western Kenya February 24, 2015. In the sugar cane fields of western Kenya, farmers complain that falling prices mean they can barely make ends meet. Yet rival African producers can still offer cheaper supplies. With much of the production coming from small rain-fed plots rather than large irrigated plantations, costs are much higher than Kenya's competitors (Reuters/Thomas Mukoya).

CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy (CSMD) Program highlights noteworthy events and articles each Friday in “This Week in Markets and Democracy.” 

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Countering Violent Extremism: Falling Between the Cracks of Development and Security

by Guest Blogger for Shannon K. O'Neil
Police stand guard during a mass burial of victims of religious attacks in the Dogo Nahawa village, about 15 km (9 miles) to the capital city of Jos in central Nigeria, March 8, 2010. Soldiers patrolled the central Nigerian city of Jos on Monday and aid workers tried to assess the death toll after attacks on outlying communities in which several hundred people were feared to have been killed (Reuters/ Akintunde Akinleye) Police stand guard during a mass burial of victims of religious attacks in the Dogo Nahawa village, about 15 km (9 miles) to the capital city of Jos in central Nigeria, March 8, 2010. Soldiers patrolled the central Nigerian city of Jos on Monday and aid workers tried to assess the death toll after attacks on outlying communities in which several hundred people were feared to have been killed (Reuters/ Akintunde Akinleye).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Dr. Khalid Koser, executive director of the Global Community Engagement and Resilience Fund (GCERF) and Amy E. Cunningham, an advisor with GCERF. Here they discuss how a global policy shift to tackle violent extremism is exposing tensions between the development and security sectors.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Calais Crisis, TPP Stalls, and Post-2015 Agreement Reached

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Sudanese migrants stand at "The New Jungle" camp in Calais, France, August 6, 2015. For most of the 3,000 inhabitants of the "Jungle", a shanty town on the sand dunes of France's north coast, the climax of each day is the nightly bid to sneak into the undersea tunnel they hope will lead to new life in Britain (Juan Medina/Reuters). Sudanese migrants stand at "The New Jungle" camp in Calais, France, August 6, 2015. For most of the 3,000 inhabitants of the "Jungle", a shanty town on the sand dunes of France's north coast, the climax of each day is the nightly bid to sneak into the undersea tunnel they hope will lead to new life in Britain (Juan Medina/Reuters).

This is a post in a new series on the Development Channel,“This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each weekCFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program will highlight noteworthy events and articles.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: TIP Report Questioned, Turkey Targets Kurds, and Cardin’s Anti-Corruption Agenda

by Shannon K. O'Neil
The leader of Turkey's pro-Kurdish opposition Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) Selahattin Demirtas answers a question during an interview with Reuters in Ankara, Turkey, July 30, 2015. The main aim of Turkey's recent military operations in northern Syria is to prevent Kurdish territorial unity and not to combat Islamic State, the leader of Turkey's pro-Kurdish opposition HDP said on Thursday. Selahattin Demirtas told Reuters in an interview that the ruling AK Party was dragging the country into conflict in revenge for losing its majority in a June 7 general election, when the HDP entered parliament as a party for the first time. To match Interview MIDEAST-CRISIS/TURKEY-KURDS REUTERS/Umit Bektas The leader of Turkey's pro-Kurdish opposition Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) Selahattin Demirtas answers a question during an interview with Reuters in Ankara, Turkey, July 30, 2015. The main aim of Turkey's recent military operations in northern Syria is to prevent Kurdish territorial unity and not to combat Islamic State, the leader of Turkey's pro-Kurdish opposition HDP said on Thursday. Selahattin Demirtas told Reuters in an interview that the ruling AK Party was dragging the country into conflict in revenge for losing its majority in a June 7 general election, when the HDP entered parliament as a party for the first time. To match Interview Mideast-crises/Turkey-Kurds (Umit Bektas/Reuters).

This is a post in a new series on the Development Channel,“This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each weekCFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program will highlight noteworthy events and articles.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Obama in East Africa, Democratic Backsliding, and Diplomatic Openings

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Wycliff Madegwa prepares to display a t-shirt newly printed with the image of U.S. President Barack Obama, ahead of his scheduled state visit, in Kenya's capital Nairobi July 23, 2015. Obama will land in Kenya on Friday with a mission to strengthen U.S. security and economic ties, but his personal connection to his father's birthplace will dominate a trip that Kenyans view as a native son returning home (Noor Khamis/Reuters). Wycliff Madegwa prepares to display a t-shirt newly printed with the image of U.S. President Barack Obama, ahead of his scheduled state visit, in Kenya's capital Nairobi July 23, 2015. Obama will land in Kenya on Friday with a mission to strengthen U.S. security and economic ties, but his personal connection to his father's birthplace will dominate a trip that Kenyans view as a native son returning home (Noor Khamis/Reuters).

This is a post in a new series on the Development Channel,“This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each weekCFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program will highlight noteworthy events and articles.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Financing for Development, Pope in Latin America, Arrests in Egypt and China

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Pope Francis waves while visiting the Banado Norte neighborhood in Asuncion, Paraguay, July 12, 2015. REUTERS/Lucas Nunez Pope Francis waves while visiting the Banado Norte neighborhood in Asuncion, Paraguay, July 12, 2015. REUTERS/Lucas Nunez

This is a post in a new series on the Development Channel,“This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each week, CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program will highlight noteworthy events and articles.

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