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Showing posts for "Millennium Development Goals"

This Week in Markets and Democracy: Central America’s Anticorruption Support, UNDP at Fifty, Foreign Bribery Action

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Demonstrators hold candles as they sing the national anthem during a march to demand the resignation of Honduras' President Juan Orlando Hernandez, in Tegucigalpa, September 11, 2015. The protesters are calling for the resignation of Hernandez over a $200-million corruption scandal at the Honduran Institute of Social Security (Reuters/Jorge Cabrera). Demonstrators hold candles as they sing the national anthem during a march to demand the resignation of Honduras' President Juan Orlando Hernandez, in Tegucigalpa, September 11, 2015. The protesters are calling for the resignation of Hernandez over a $200-million corruption scandal at the Honduran Institute of Social Security (Reuters/Jorge Cabrera).

Central America’s Anticorruption Support
The presidents of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras were in Washington to discuss plans for the $750 million that Congress authorized to help their nations take on violence and boost economic development. The outlay comes in the wake of a record uptick in Central American migration to the United States. Nearly 3 million people have fled their homes and neighborhoods, including 100,000 unaccompanied minors who arrived at the southern border between October 2013 and July 2015. The U.S. funding requires Northern Triangle governments to address myriad domestic problems, including strengthening legal systems, protecting human rights, and rooting out corruption. U.S. anticorruption efforts will be met with broad civil society and multilateral support, dovetailing with grassroots campaigns against graft and high-level impunity in Honduras and Guatemala, and furthering the resolve of multilateral-backed bodies such as Honduras’s new Mission Against Corruption and Impunity (MACCIH).

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Will Setting Goals End Hunger? What’s Next for the SDGs…

by Guest Blogger for Shannon K. O'Neil
U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (L), Lars Lokke Rasmussen (C), co-chair and Danish Prime Minister, and Yoweri Kaguta Museveni, co-chair and Uganda's President, applaud at a plenary meeting of the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 2015 at United Nations headquarters in Manhattan, New York, September 25, 2015. World leaders on Friday adopted the most sweeping agenda ever of global goals to combat poverty, inequality and climate change, described by the United Nations secretary-general as "a to-do list for people and planet" (Reuters/Mike Segar). U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (L), Lars Lokke Rasmussen (C), co-chair and Danish Prime Minister, and Yoweri Kaguta Museveni, co-chair and Uganda's President, applaud at a plenary meeting of the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 2015 at United Nations headquarters in Manhattan, New York, September 25, 2015. World leaders on Friday adopted the most sweeping agenda ever of global goals to combat poverty, inequality and climate change, described by the United Nations secretary-general as "a to-do list for people and planet" (Reuters/Mike Segar).

Emerging Voices highlights new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges from contributing scholars and practitioners. This post is from Dean Karlan, professor of economics at Yale University, president and founder of Innovations for Poverty Action, and founder of ImpactMatters, a newly-launched organization that helps nonprofits use and create evidence to assess their impact.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Sustainable Development Goals Adopted

by Shannon K. O'Neil
U.S. President Barack Obama addresses attendees during a plenary meeting of the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 2015 at the United Nations headquarters in Manhattan, New York September 27, 2015. More than 150 world leaders are expected to attend the UN Sustainable Development Summit from September 25-27, 2015 at United Nations in New York to formally adopt an ambitious new sustainable development agenda, a press statement by the U.N. stated (Reuters/Mike Segar). U.S. President Barack Obama addresses attendees during a plenary meeting of the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 2015 at the United Nations headquarters in Manhattan, New York September 27, 2015. More than 150 world leaders are expected to attend the UN Sustainable Development Summit from September 25-27, 2015 at United Nations in New York to formally adopt an ambitious new sustainable development agenda, a press statement by the U.N. stated (Reuters/Mike Segar).

The biggest achievement of the past week’s United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) in New York was the adoption of a new fifteen-year plan for global development. Replacing the soon-to-expire Millennium Development Goals, seventeen new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will guide UN and domestic development policies through 2030 with an ambitious, and some say overly idealistic agenda. Based on UN member and civil society input over a three-year process, the final set of SDGs aims to eliminate hunger, reduce inequality, promote shared economic growth, and “end poverty in all its forms everywhere.” President Obama, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, and Pope Francis all endorsed the new “global goals” during the three-day UN Sustainable Development Summit held in the run-up to UNGA. Here are two major takeaways from the summit:

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: TPP’s Auto Delay, Cleaning Up Supply Chains, and International Anti-Corruption Conference

by Shannon K. O'Neil
An artisanal miner washes tin ore before it is bagged up and weighed, ready to be transported to the nearest major town for export in the Kalimbi tin mine near the small town of Nyabibwe, October 31, 2012. Eastern Congo has been mired in violence since the 1990s, as battles over ethnicity and resources saw neighbouring countries invade, armed groups spring up and the country's own army turning on the civilian population. A so-called "conflict-free tin initiative" seeking to revive the legal trade in minerals has been set up by UK based industry body ITRI, which is currently the only traceability programme operating in Rwanda, and Congo's more stable Katanga province. Now, with international backers including the U.S. and the Netherlands, a tagging project has been launched for the first time in the Kivus, the two Congolese provinces which have borne the brunt of the violence and have been the source of most of the region's conflict minerals (Jonny Hogg/Reuters). An artisanal miner washes tin ore before it is bagged up and weighed, ready to be transported to the nearest major town for export in the Kalimbi tin mine near the small town of Nyabibwe, October 31, 2012. Eastern Congo has been mired in violence since the 1990s, as battles over ethnicity and resources saw neighbouring countries invade, armed groups spring up and the country's own army turning on the civilian population. A so-called "conflict-free tin initiative" seeking to revive the legal trade in minerals has been set up by UK based industry body ITRI, which is currently the only traceability programme operating in Rwanda, and Congo's more stable Katanga province. Now, with international backers including the U.S. and the Netherlands, a tagging project has been launched for the first time in the Kivus, the two Congolese provinces which have borne the brunt of the violence and have been the source of most of the region's conflict minerals (Jonny Hogg/Reuters).

CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy (CSMD) Program highlights noteworthy events and articles each Friday in “This Week in Markets and Democracy.”

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Calais Crisis, TPP Stalls, and Post-2015 Agreement Reached

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Sudanese migrants stand at "The New Jungle" camp in Calais, France, August 6, 2015. For most of the 3,000 inhabitants of the "Jungle", a shanty town on the sand dunes of France's north coast, the climax of each day is the nightly bid to sneak into the undersea tunnel they hope will lead to new life in Britain (Juan Medina/Reuters). Sudanese migrants stand at "The New Jungle" camp in Calais, France, August 6, 2015. For most of the 3,000 inhabitants of the "Jungle", a shanty town on the sand dunes of France's north coast, the climax of each day is the nightly bid to sneak into the undersea tunnel they hope will lead to new life in Britain (Juan Medina/Reuters).

This is a post in a new series on the Development Channel,“This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each weekCFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program will highlight noteworthy events and articles.

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Innovation in Development

by Rachel Vogelstein
Pregnant women holding their prescription papers wait to be examined at a government-run hospital in the northeastern Indian city of Agartala March 17, 2015. India is betting on cheap mobile phones to cut some of the world's highest rates of maternal and child deaths, as it rolls out a campaign of voice messages delivering health advice to pregnant women and mothers. Amid a scarcity of doctors and public hospitals, India is relying on its mobile telephone network, the second largest in the world with 950 million connections, to reach places where health workers rarely go. REUTERS/Jayanta Dey Pregnant women holding their prescription papers wait to be examined at a government-run hospital in the northeastern Indian city of Agartala March 17, 2015. India is betting on cheap mobile phones to cut some of the world's highest rates of maternal and child deaths, as it rolls out a campaign of voice messages delivering health advice to pregnant women and mothers. Amid a scarcity of doctors and public hospitals, India is relying on its mobile telephone network, the second largest in the world with 950 million connections, to reach places where health workers rarely go. REUTERS/Jayanta Dey

Amidst final negotiations over the Sustainable Development Goals, both private and public sector development funders are turning their attention to the gap between this ambitious agenda and available resources. Last week, government, business, and NGO representatives gathered in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for the Third Financing for Development Conference to devise ways to support this new development agenda. One proposal is to support innovation to fuel cost-effective approaches to development.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Financing for Development, Pope in Latin America, Arrests in Egypt and China

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Pope Francis waves while visiting the Banado Norte neighborhood in Asuncion, Paraguay, July 12, 2015. REUTERS/Lucas Nunez Pope Francis waves while visiting the Banado Norte neighborhood in Asuncion, Paraguay, July 12, 2015. REUTERS/Lucas Nunez

This is a post in a new series on the Development Channel,“This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each week, CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program will highlight noteworthy events and articles.

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The UN’s Third Financing for Development Conference: After Growth & Aid, What Comes Next?

by Shannon K. O'Neil
U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon addresses the opening of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development in Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa, July 13, 2015 (Tiksa Neger, Reuters). U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon addresses the opening of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development in Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa, July 13, 2015 (Tiksa Neger, Reuters).

Governments, civil society groups, and business leaders are gathered this week in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for the UN’s Third Financing for Development Conference (FFD3). Up for debate is how to fund the Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs, a new set of global development indicators that the UN will adopt in September.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Development Debate, Modi Controls India’s Narrative, and Reigning in Civil Society

by Shannon K. O'Neil
India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi attends an event organised by the Christian community to celebrate the beatification of two Indians by Pope Francis late last year, in New Delhi February 17, 2015. Modi vowed on Tuesday to protect all religious groups, an apparent response to a series of attacks on Christian institutions in New Delhi fueling concerns that minorities are being targeted by Hindu zealots. (Stringer/Reuters) India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi attends an event organised by the Christian community to celebrate the beatification of two Indians by Pope Francis late last year, in New Delhi February 17, 2015. Modi vowed on Tuesday to protect all religious groups, an apparent response to a series of attacks on Christian institutions in New Delhi fueling concerns that minorities are being targeted by Hindu zealots. (Stringer/Reuters)

This is a post in a new series on the Development Channel,“This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each week, CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program will highlight noteworthy events and articles.

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Gender Equality and the Sustainable Development Goals

by Rachel Vogelstein
UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon speaks during a closing ceremony of the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development summit in Rio de Janeiro June 22, 2012. Ueslei Marcelino/Courtesy Reuters UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon speaks during a closing ceremony of the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development summit in Rio de Janeiro June 22, 2012. Ueslei Marcelino/Courtesy Reuters

This year—2015—is an auspicious moment for global development. In September, as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) expire, UN member states will adopt a new framework that will guide international development over the next fifteen years. In advance of the fall summit on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)—as well as the upcoming Third International Financing for Development Conference in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia—I hosted Thomas Gass, assistant secretary-general for policy coordination and inter-agency affairs at the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, and Ambassador Elizabeth Cousens, deputy chief executive officer at the United Nations Foundation and former U.S. chief negotiator on the SDGs, to discuss gender equality and the future of the international development agenda.

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