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Showing posts for "Property Rights"

POSCO vs. The People?

by Terra Lawson-Remer
A farmer collects betel leaves near POSCO India's Odisha Project site in the eastern Indian state of Odisha, February 2013 (Courtesy Reuters). A farmer collects betel leaves near POSCO India's Odisha Project site in the eastern Indian state of Odisha, February 2013 (Courtesy Reuters).

Last week, a United Nations expert panel issued a harsh report expressing concern over the construction of a $12 billion steel project in Odisha, India, financed by the South Korean steel conglomerate POSCO. The project reportedly threatens to forcibly displace over 22,000 people and disrupt the livelihoods of many thousands more. Read more »

Fighting Poverty with Land

by Guest Blogger for Isobel Coleman
Women harvest paddy in Bhatar, West Bengal, India, 2001 (Courtesy Reuters). Women harvest paddy in Bhatar, West Bengal, India, 2001 (Courtesy Reuters).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Ashok Sircar and Tim Hanstad of Landesa, a global development non-profit that works to secure land rights for the world’s poor. Here they discuss how coordinating development projects can help lift families out of poverty.

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Boosting Businesswomen in the Bottom Billion

by Isobel Coleman
A woman at work in Nieuw Aurora, Suriname, September 2012 (Courtesy Reuters/Ranu Abhelakh). A woman at work in Nieuw Aurora, Suriname, September 2012 (Courtesy Reuters/Ranu Abhelakh).

Extreme poverty, defined as living on less than $1.25 per day, has declined significantly in recent decades. Thirty years ago, more than half of the world’s population lived in extreme poverty – today, less than a quarter do. Still, that translates into some 1.2 billion people living in extreme poverty, and a disproportionate number of them are female. Overall, seventy percent of the world’s poor and about two-thirds of the world’s hungry and malnourished population are women and girls.

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Emerging Voices: Ruth Canagarajah on Post-War Land Grabs in Sri Lanka

by Guest Blogger for Isobel Coleman
Chili-pickers near the High Security Zone border in Valikamam North, Sri Lanka (Image by author). Chili-pickers near the High Security Zone border in Valikamam North, Sri Lanka (Image by author).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Ruth Canagarajah, a Fulbright fellow in northern Sri Lanka who is researching the intersection of natural resources, livelihoods, and post-war challenges. Here she analyzes the impact of military land grabs on Sri Lanka’s post-war recovery process.

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Emerging Voices: Ashok Sircar on Women’s Right to Inherit Land in India

by Guest Blogger for Isobel Coleman
A farmer harvests a rice paddy crop on the outskirts of the eastern Indian city of Siliguri on June 7, 2009 (Rupak De Chowdhuri/Courtesy Reuters). A farmer harvests a rice paddy crop on the outskirts of the eastern Indian city of Siliguri on June 7, 2009 (Rupak De Chowdhuri/Courtesy Reuters).

Emerging Voices features regular contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from
Dr. Ashok Sircar, India program director at Landesa, a global development nonprofit that works to secure land rights for the world’s poor. Here, he analyzes the obstacles preventing Indian women from exercising their right to inherit land and discusses potential policy solutions.

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Land Rights, Equity, and Economic Growth

by Terra Lawson-Remer
DATE IMPORTED:March 7, 2013A red sign "We must retaliate" is displayed next to an upended car at the entrance of Shangpu village, in China's southern Guangdong province on March 5, 2013 (James Pomfret/Courtesy Reuters). A red sign "We must retaliate" is displayed next to an upended car at the entrance of Shangpu village, in China's southern Guangdong province on March 5, 2013 (James Pomfret/Courtesy Reuters).

Counter-intuitively, economic growth (a prerequisite for reducing poverty in the world’s poorest countries) and the well-being of the worst-off and most vulnerable populations are often at odds in the developing world. Read more »

Emerging Voices: Amanda Richardson on Land Rights for Women

by Guest Blogger for Isobel Coleman
Women in West Bengal, India, line up to sign their names to receive land titles at a government distribution ceremony in 2011 (Courtesy Landesa). Women in West Bengal, India, line up to sign their names to receive land titles at a government distribution ceremony in 2011 (Courtesy Landesa).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Amanda Richardson, an attorney and land tenure specialist with Landesa. She discusses the benefits that secure land rights can bring to women and their communities.

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The Paradox of Property Rights and Economic Development

by Terra Lawson-Remer
Villagers shout for their farms and villages during protests against the Lebadaung copper mine project in Sarlingyi township in Myanmar on September 12, 2012 (Soe Zeya Tun/Courtesy Reuters). Villagers shout for their farms and villages during protests against the Lebadaung copper mine project in Sarlingyi township in Myanmar on September 12, 2012 (Soe Zeya Tun/Courtesy Reuters).

Recent weeks have seen simmering property rights conflicts around the world: Burmese citizens marching in protest against the government’s seizure of their lands for a hotel zone; Vietnamese villagers contesting the confiscation of their land for an EcoPark satellite city project; and violent clashes breaking out in Panama City over a controversial law allowing the sale of state-owned land in the port city of Colón—Latin America’s largest duty-free zone.

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Legal Empowerment, Governance, and Development

by Terra Lawson-Remer
Former gold miner Thulani Bitsha, 39, talks to paralegal assistant Noncedo Mbalo at his home near Bizana in South Africa's impoverished Eastern Cape province, March 7, 2012 (Mike Hutchings/Courtesy Reuters). Former gold miner Thulani Bitsha, 39, talks to paralegal assistant Noncedo Mbalo at his home near Bizana in South Africa's impoverished Eastern Cape province, March 7, 2012 (Mike Hutchings/Courtesy Reuters).

A new consensus has emerged in recent years that good institutions—especially the fair and predictable rule of law, and accountable governments that effectively serve their citizens—are prerequisites for sustainable and inclusive growth.  In this view, getting governance right is an integral part of reducing poverty. Read more »

Emerging Voices: Stanislav Markus on Bottom-Up Property Rights

by Guest Blogger for Isobel Coleman
A view of the Odessa Port fertiliser plant in Odessa, Ukraine, on September 29, 2009 (Courtesy Reuters). A view of the Odessa Port fertiliser plant in Odessa, Ukraine, on September 29, 2009 (Courtesy Reuters).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Stanislav Markus, assistant professor of political science at the University of Chicago. Markus outlines his findings from a recent article on how firms in Russia and Ukraine can use bottom-up methods to protect their property rights in a weak state environment.

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