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Showing posts for "Rule of Law"

Holding Sudan to the Gold Standard

by Catherine Powell
Military personnel walk past women in Tabit village in North Darfur, Sudan. The joint peacekeeping mission in the region known as UNAMID visited Tabit in November 2014 to investigate media reports of an alleged mass rape of 200 women and girls (Courtesy Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters). Military personnel walk past women in Tabit village in North Darfur, Sudan. The joint peacekeeping mission in the region known as UNAMID visited Tabit in November 2014 to investigate media reports of an alleged mass rape of 200 women and girls (Courtesy Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters).

Although it may have slipped from headlines, the conflict in Sudan’s western region of Darfur has not disappeared. Indeed, the region has seen almost unabated violence for over a decade, notably spiking in January 2013. In February of this year, a Human Rights Watch report shed light on the violence, documenting mass rape and other atrocities committed by forces loyal to the Sudanese government from October 30 to November 1, 2014.

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Mexico’s Fight Against Corruption

by Shannon K. O'Neil
Relatives of the 43 missing students of the Ayotzinapa teachers' training college hold pictures of the students during a demonstration to demand justice, in Mexico City, November 5, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Tomas Bravo). Relatives of the 43 missing students of the Ayotzinapa teachers' training college hold pictures of the students during a demonstration to demand justice, in Mexico City, November 5, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Tomas Bravo).

Corruption allegations and revelations cover Mexico’s front pages. Public officials’ penchant for expensive watches, use of government helicopters for personal errands, and a string of expensive houses facilitated by preferred private contractors have incensed not only Mexico’s chattering classes but also the broader public. 2014 opinion polls conducted by the Pew Research Center show corruption ranks second only to crime in citizen concerns.

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Helping Afghan Women Help Themselves

by Catherine Powell
Shukria Barakzai, a member of parliament, hands out leaflets during her August 2005 election campaign in Kabul, Afghanistan. Barakzai later survived a suicide bombing attack in December 2014 (Courtesy Zohra Bensemra/Reuters). Shukria Barakzai, a member of parliament, hands out leaflets during her August 2005 election campaign in Kabul, Afghanistan. Barakzai later survived a suicide bombing attack in December 2014 (Courtesy Zohra Bensemra/Reuters).

Progress toward women’s rights and empowerment cannot be made without actors on the ground willing to fight for it. This is particularly true in Afghanistan as the United States begins to transition out of its on-the-ground presence and the Afghan government takes on more responsibility for security and stability. Local women’s rights movements will be more important than ever in ensuring Afghan women and girls maintain the strides they have made since the fall of the Taliban.

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Female Police Face Danger in Afghanistan

by Catherine Powell
A female Afghan National Police (ANP) officer gives instructions during a patrol training session, at a training center near the German Bundeswehr army camp in Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, December 2012 (Courtesy Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters). A female Afghan National Police (ANP) officer gives instructions during a patrol training session, at a training center near the German Bundeswehr army camp in Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, December 2012 (Courtesy Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters).

As Afghanistan works to maintain stability in the wake of the U.S. drawdown, I have consistently written about the unique challenges faced by women and girls in the changing security landscape. One strategy that I—and other commentators on Afghanistan—have called for to ensure the safety of women and girls and the continued expansion of women’s rights is the greater inclusion of women in the Afghan police force.

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Police Corruption: A Threat to Afghan Stability, a Threat to Afghan Women

by Catherine Powell
A policeman stands in front of a car window, which has been hit by a bullet, after clashes with protesters in Kabul, Afghanistan, January 31, 2015 (Courtesy Mohammad Ismail/Reuters). A policeman stands in front of a car window, which has been hit by a bullet, after clashes with protesters in Kabul, Afghanistan, January 31, 2015 (Courtesy Mohammad Ismail/Reuters).

This week, the New York Times reported that 32 officers of the Afghan National Police (ANP) in the Kunduz province are under suspicion in an ongoing investigation for corruption and ties to the Taliban. The report details harrowing crimes committed by police in Kunduz, including the kidnapping of children and rape of the citizens they are meant to protect.

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A Broader Definition of Security in Post-2014 Afghanistan

by Catherine Powell
U.S. Marines lower their flag during a handover ceremony, as the last U.S. Marines unit and British combat troops end their Afghan operations, in Helmand, Afghanistan, October 26, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Omar Sobhani ). U.S. Marines lower their flag during a handover ceremony, as the last U.S. Marines unit and British combat troops end their Afghan operations, in Helmand, Afghanistan, October 26, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Omar Sobhani ).

Earlier this month, the United States and NATO lowered the flags over their mission in Kabul in the first of two ceremonies that mark the end of the international combat mission in Afghanistan. Over the next few weeks, foreign troops in Afghanistan will be transitioning to a training and support role.

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Prosecuting Sexual Violence Offenders after Conflict

by svonwendel
A Tutsi woman passes between a guerilla from the Rwandan Patriotic Front on the left and a wounded man on the right, Rwanda, May 1994 (Courtesy Reuters). A Tutsi woman passes between a guerilla from the Rwandan Patriotic Front on the left and a wounded man on the right, Rwanda, May 1994 (Courtesy Reuters).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Sigrid von Wendel, who edits the Development Channel.

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Legal Rights on the Books and in Practice

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer
Demonstrators handcuff their wrists and tape their eyes and mouths while taking part in a protest calling for changes to the constitution. Yangon, Myanmar, January 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Stringer). Demonstrators handcuff their wrists and tape their eyes and mouths while taking part in a protest calling for changes to the constitution. Yangon, Myanmar, January 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Stringer).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article from Juan Carlos Botero, executive director of the World Justice Project, is part of an ongoing Development Channel series on global justice and development.

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Balancing Security and Accountability

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer
Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir waves at military soldiers in Heglig, Sudan, April 2012 (Courtesy Reuters/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah). Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir waves at military soldiers in Heglig, Sudan, April 2012 (Courtesy Reuters/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Nema Milaninia, a legal officer in the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY). The views expressed are those of the author alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations or the ICTY. This piece is part of an ongoing Development Channel series on global justice and development.

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Helping the Oppressed, not the Oppressors

by Isobel Coleman
A Uighur worker pulls a cart past a statue of the late chairman Mao Zedong at the People's Square in Kashgar, China, September 2003 (Courtesy Reuters). A Uighur worker pulls a cart past a statue of the late chairman Mao Zedong at the People's Square in Kashgar, China, September 2003 (Courtesy Reuters).

As protestors from Kiev to Khartoum to Caracas take to the streets against autocracy, a new book from economist William Easterly reminds us that Western aid is too often on the wrong side of the battle for freedom and democracy.  In The Tyranny of Experts: Economists, Dictators, and the Forgotten Rights of the PoorEasterly slams the development community for supporting autocrats, not democrats, in the name of helping the world’s poorest. Ignoring human rights abuses and giving aid to oppressive regimes, he maintains, harms those in need and in many ways “un-develops” countries.

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