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Showing posts for "Rule of Law"

Prosecuting Sexual Violence Offenders after Conflict

by svonwendel
A Tutsi woman passes between a guerilla from the Rwandan Patriotic Front on the left and a wounded man on the right, Rwanda, May 1994 (Courtesy Reuters). A Tutsi woman passes between a guerilla from the Rwandan Patriotic Front on the left and a wounded man on the right, Rwanda, May 1994 (Courtesy Reuters).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Sigrid von Wendel, who edits the Development Channel.

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Legal Rights on the Books and in Practice

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer
Demonstrators handcuff their wrists and tape their eyes and mouths while taking part in a protest calling for changes to the constitution. Yangon, Myanmar, January 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Stringer). Demonstrators handcuff their wrists and tape their eyes and mouths while taking part in a protest calling for changes to the constitution. Yangon, Myanmar, January 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Stringer).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article from Juan Carlos Botero, executive director of the World Justice Project, is part of an ongoing Development Channel series on global justice and development.

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Balancing Security and Accountability

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer
Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir waves at military soldiers in Heglig, Sudan, April 2012 (Courtesy Reuters/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah). Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir waves at military soldiers in Heglig, Sudan, April 2012 (Courtesy Reuters/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Nema Milaninia, a legal officer in the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY). The views expressed are those of the author alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations or the ICTY. This piece is part of an ongoing Development Channel series on global justice and development.

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Helping the Oppressed, not the Oppressors

by Isobel Coleman
A Uighur worker pulls a cart past a statue of the late chairman Mao Zedong at the People's Square in Kashgar, China, September 2003 (Courtesy Reuters). A Uighur worker pulls a cart past a statue of the late chairman Mao Zedong at the People's Square in Kashgar, China, September 2003 (Courtesy Reuters).

As protestors from Kiev to Khartoum to Caracas take to the streets against autocracy, a new book from economist William Easterly reminds us that Western aid is too often on the wrong side of the battle for freedom and democracy.  In The Tyranny of Experts: Economists, Dictators, and the Forgotten Rights of the PoorEasterly slams the development community for supporting autocrats, not democrats, in the name of helping the world’s poorest. Ignoring human rights abuses and giving aid to oppressive regimes, he maintains, harms those in need and in many ways “un-develops” countries.

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Make Rule of Law a Development Goal

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer
U.S. President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the Millennium Development Goals Conference at the United Nations in New York City, September 22, 2010 (Courtesy Reuters/Eric Thayer). U.S. President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the Millennium Development Goals Conference at the United Nations in New York City, September 22, 2010 (Courtesy Reuters/Eric Thayer).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from James A. Goldston, the executive director of the Open Society Justice Initiative, which advances the rule of law and legal protection of rights worldwide through advocacy, litigation, research, and the promotion of legal capacity. Here he discusses why rule of law should be included in the post-2015 development agenda. This piece is part of an ongoing Development Channel series on global justice and development.

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Emerging Voices: Natalie Bugalski and David Pred on the Dark Side of Development

by Guest Blogger for Isobel Coleman
Ruqia Aroo, 80, carries her malnourished grandson near carcasses of dead cattle, Ethiopia, April 2000 (Courtesy Reuters). Ruqia Aroo, 80, carries her malnourished grandson near carcasses of dead cattle, Ethiopia, April 2000 (Courtesy Reuters).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Natalie Bugalski and David Pred of Inclusive Development International. Here they discuss the World Bank’s Safeguard Policies review process.

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What’s Next for Global Development?

by Terra Lawson-Remer
A UN worker rests after checking the temporary General Assembly Hall at the UN headquarters in New York, September 22, 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Eduardo Munoz). A UN worker rests after checking the temporary General Assembly Hall at the UN headquarters in New York, September 22, 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Eduardo Munoz).

This week, the United Nations convenes its sixty-eight General Assembly session, bringing together heads of state and other high officials from all 193 members of the UN. Although many pressing global challenges crowd the agenda of world leaders, the major theme of this year’s session is the global development agenda after 2015, when the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which have guided global development policy since 2000, expire. In several earlier blog posts, I discussed issues that should be considered in crafting the new development agenda. Now the international community must come together to determine what comes next.

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Child Brides Caught in Conflict

by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon
Krishna, above, was married when she was 11 and had her first child at age 14. Baran, India, January 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Danish Siddiqui). Krishna, above, was married when she was 11 and had her first child at age 14. Baran, India, January 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Danish Siddiqui).

In conflict zones, some families view child marriage as a way to preserve their daughter’s honor and protect her from the sexual assault and gender-based violence that commonly occurs in warzones and refugee camps. In reality, however, child marriage only further threatens girls in unstable environments.

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Responses to “The Need for Lawyers Without Borders”

by Terra Lawson-Remer
Statue of Roman Goddess Justicia in London, 2001 (Courtesy Reuters). Statue of Roman Goddess Justicia in London, 2001 (Courtesy Reuters).

My blog post last week proposing a global “Lawyers Without Borders” organization to represent local communities on international economic law issues generated such an unusual number of emails and comments I think it is worthwhile to highlight a couple responses.

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The Need for “Lawyers Without Borders”

by Terra Lawson-Remer
Amazon Indians in front of the Ministry of Mines and Energy in Brasilia, Brazil, protesting the construction of the Belo Monte hydroelectric plant, June 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Lunae Parracho). Amazon Indians in front of the Ministry of Mines and Energy in Brasilia, Brazil, protesting the construction of the Belo Monte hydroelectric plant, June 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Lunae Parracho).

Private capital flows through foreign direct investment and portfolio investment now exceed $1 trillion annually. This has deep income, wealth distribution, and human rights effects for people around the world—creating opportunity for many, but leaving some behind. Read more »