CFR Presents

Development Channel

Issues and innovations in global economic development

Combating Sexual Assault in Conflict

by svonwendel Wednesday, May 7, 2014
A woman holding a newborn stands in front of African Union troops in the Central African Republic, April 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Siegfried Modola). A woman holding a newborn stands in front of African Union troops in the Central African Republic, April 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Siegfried Modola).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Sigrid von Wendel, who edits the Development Channel and Democracy in Development blogs.

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Corporate Idealism

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer Monday, May 5, 2014
Workers contracted by British Petroleum (BP) search the beach for tar balls from the Deepwater Horizon oil leak. Grand Isle, Louisiana, May 30, 2010 (Courtesy Reuters/Lee Celano). Workers contracted by British Petroleum (BP) search the beach for tar balls from the Deepwater Horizon oil leak. Grand Isle, Louisiana, May 30, 2010 (Courtesy Reuters/Lee Celano).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Christine Bader, author of The Evolution of a Corporate Idealist: When Girl Meets Oil.

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Preference for Sons Hurts Mothers

by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon Thursday, May 1, 2014
Phul Kumari with her child in India's northern state of Uttar Pradesh, October 2011 (Courtesy Reuters/TrustLaw/Nita Bhalla). Phul Kumari with her child in India's northern state of Uttar Pradesh, October 2011 (Courtesy Reuters/TrustLaw/Nita Bhalla).

For more than a century, cultural norms and traditions in India and elsewhere have favored sons over daughters—a preference based on age-old beliefs that male children add to household wealth, provide for parents and relatives in their old age, and carry the family name. Female children are viewed as financial burdens that add little value to the family and deplete income come wedding time. But while researchers have tracked the ramifications of son preference and male-biased sex ratios at birth, little is known of the effects of the bias on adult female mortality.

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Water Abundance Is Within Reach

by Guest Blogger for Isobel Coleman Wednesday, April 30, 2014
Children play around a communal tap servicing the Imizamo Yethu community near Cape Town, South Africa, August 2002 (Courtesy Reuters/ Mike Hutchings). Children play around a communal tap servicing the Imizamo Yethu community near Cape Town, South Africa, August 2002 (Courtesy Reuters/ Mike Hutchings).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Efrat Peled, Chairman and CEO of Arison Investments, which creates long-term business investments that combine substantial financial results with sustainable moral responsibility.

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Calling Women

by Guest Blogger for Isobel Coleman Tuesday, April 29, 2014
A woman uses a mobile phone near kumquat trees in Hanoi, Vietnam, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Kham). A woman uses a mobile phone near kumquat trees in Hanoi, Vietnam, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Kham).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Henriette Kolb, head of the Gender Secretariat at the International Finance Corporation (IFC), a member of the World Bank Group, and Olufemi Terry, communications specialist at the IFC Gender Secretariat.

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New Report on Strategies to Stop Child Marriage

by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon and lemmonguest Thursday, April 24, 2014
Child bride Krishna, 12, plays on an improvised swing outside her house in a village near Baran, India, July 2011 (Courtesy Reuters/Danish Siddiqui). Child bride Krishna, 12, plays on an improvised swing outside her house in a village near Baran, India, July 2011 (Courtesy Reuters/Danish Siddiqui).

This post is from Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) fellow, and Lynn ElHarake, research associate for the CFR Women and Foreign Policy Program. It has been edited from an original post on Girls Not Brides. 

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Empowering Female Entrepreneurs in Rwanda

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer Thursday, April 10, 2014
Artisan entrepreneurs receive business training from Indego Africa at their cooperative, Covanya, in Nyamata, Rwanda, 2011 (Courtesy Benjamin D. Stone, copyright Indego Africa). Artisan entrepreneurs receive business training from Indego Africa at their cooperative, Covanya, in Nyamata, Rwanda, 2011 (Courtesy Benjamin D. Stone, copyright Indego Africa).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Benjamin D. Stone, director of strategy and general counsel at MicroCredit Enterprises, CFR term member, and vice chairman of Indego Africa; and Karen Yelick, CEO of Indego Africa. Here they discuss how Indego Africa’s Leadership Academy for female artisan entrepreneurs in Rwanda aligns with the country’s twenty-year history of empowering women leaders.

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Legal Rights on the Books and in Practice

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer Wednesday, April 9, 2014
Demonstrators handcuff their wrists and tape their eyes and mouths while taking part in a protest calling for changes to the constitution. Yangon, Myanmar, January 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Stringer). Demonstrators handcuff their wrists and tape their eyes and mouths while taking part in a protest calling for changes to the constitution. Yangon, Myanmar, January 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Stringer).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article from Juan Carlos Botero, executive director of the World Justice Project, is part of an ongoing Development Channel series on global justice and development.

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The Potential of Clean Cookstoves

by Isobel Coleman Thursday, April 3, 2014
A woman cooks inside her home in San Juan, Honduras, August 2008 (Courtesy Reuters/Edgard Garrido). A woman cooks inside her home in San Juan, Honduras, August 2008 (Courtesy Reuters/Edgard Garrido).

For decades, global health experts have recognized that smoke from indoor cooking is a major contributor to premature death.  Yet, in poor countries around the world, some 3 billion people still rely on wood, coal, or animal dung to cook their food over indoor fires. The impact of the resulting indoor air pollution is devastating, particularly for the women and girls who are largely responsible for cooking and bear the brunt of the smoke. A new study calculates that the toll from indoor air pollution is even larger than previously thought: the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that exposure to smoke from traditional cooking was linked to 4.3 million deaths in 2012 – more than was attributable to HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis combined, and double the number estimated just five years ago.

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Formalizing Economies to Fight Poverty

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Men look for metals and other valuables in the waste waters of the city dump in Guatemala City, Guatemala, September 2011 (Courtesy Reuters/Jorge Dan Lopez). Men look for metals and other valuables in the waste waters of the city dump in Guatemala City, Guatemala, September 2011 (Courtesy Reuters/Jorge Dan Lopez).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Karen Tramontano, founder and president of the Global Fairness Initiative, and is part of an ongoing Development Channel series on global justice and development.

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