CFR Presents

Development Channel

Issues and innovations in global economic development

Women and Girls in the Afghanistan Transition

by Catherine Powell Thursday, June 19, 2014
An Afghan woman walks inside a police compound in Herat province, Afghanistan, March 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Mohmmad Shoib). An Afghan woman walks inside a police compound in Herat province, Afghanistan, March 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Mohmmad Shoib).

When the Taliban were in power in Afghanistan, they shuttered girls’ schools, segregated many aspects of public life, including the workplace, and prevented women from leaving their homes unless accompanied by a male relative escort. Since those dark days, Afghan women and girls have pushed diligently to expand their rights and remove gender restrictions on access to education, work, and health care. Read more »

Leading Green Finance in Bolivia

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer Tuesday, June 17, 2014
A worker looks at lemons at a plant in Cuatro Cañadas, Bolivia, December 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/David Mercado). A worker looks at lemons at a plant in Cuatro Cañadas, Bolivia, December 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/David Mercado).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Heidi Sumser, senior associate at A2F Consulting in Washington, D.C., and former environmental management coordinator at Banco Los Andes ProCredit, Bolivia.

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The Status of Women and Girls in the World Today

by Isobel Coleman Saturday, May 31, 2014
A protester addresses the "Bring Back Our Girls" protest group as they march to the presidential villa to deliver a protest letter to Nigeria's President Goodluck Jonathan in Abuja, calling for the release of the Nigerian schoolgirls in Chibok who were kidnapped by Islamist militant group Boko Haram, May 22, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Afolabi Sotunde). A protester addresses the "Bring Back Our Girls" protest group as they march to the presidential villa to deliver a protest letter to Nigeria's President Goodluck Jonathan in Abuja, calling for the release of the Nigerian schoolgirls in Chibok who were kidnapped by Islamist militant group Boko Haram, May 22, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Afolabi Sotunde).

How terrible is it to be born a girl in the world today? The almost daily headlines about cruel acts of violence and discrimination against women — from the kidnapping of nearly 300 school girls in Nigeria last month, to the latest gruesome stoning of a woman in Pakistan – provide plenty of reasons to be pessimistic about women’s equality and safety in today’s world.

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World Bank Report on Women’s Empowerment Breaks New Ground

by Isobel Coleman Friday, May 16, 2014
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, UN Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim, and Council on Foreign Relations Senior Fellow Isobel Coleman participate in an event on empowering woman and girls at the World Bank in Washington, D.C., May 14, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Jonathan Ernst). Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, UN Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim, and Council on Foreign Relations Senior Fellow Isobel Coleman participate in an event on empowering woman and girls at the World Bank in Washington, D.C., May 14, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Jonathan Ernst).

Over the past several decades, the World Bank has been an important thought leader on the value of investing in women and girls. In 2001, the Bank released a seminal report, “Engendering Development – Through Gender Equality in Rights, Resources, and Voice,” which made the incontrovertible case that investing in girls’ education and other aspects of female empowerment is critical for poverty alleviation. More recently, in 2012, the Bank devoted its annual World Development Report to women and girls, highlighting that, despite gains, gender gaps persist and greater gender equality is critical to growth.

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Financial Inclusion: A New Common Ground for Central Banks

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer Monday, May 12, 2014
Customers are seen at mobile money transfers kiosks, known as M-Pesa agents, near Nairobi, Kenya, July 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Thomas Mukoya). Customers are seen at mobile money transfers kiosks, known as M-Pesa agents, near Nairobi, Kenya, July 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Thomas Mukoya).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Alfred Hannig, executive director of the Alliance for Financial Inclusion.

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An Alliance to Measure What Matters: Governance and the Post-2015 Development Agenda

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer Monday, May 12, 2014
Riot policemen shield themselves as fireworks thrown by protesters explode next to the statue of a bull during an anti-government, anti-corruption protest in Istanbul, Turkey, March 11, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Stringer). Riot policemen shield themselves as fireworks thrown by protesters explode next to the statue of a bull during an anti-government, anti-corruption protest in Istanbul, Turkey, March 11, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Stringer).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article from Alicia Phillips Mandaville, managing director of Development Policy at the Millennium Challenge Corporation, is part of an ongoing Development Channel series on global justice and development.

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Combating Sexual Assault in Conflict

by svonwendel Wednesday, May 7, 2014
A woman holding a newborn stands in front of African Union troops in the Central African Republic, April 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Siegfried Modola). A woman holding a newborn stands in front of African Union troops in the Central African Republic, April 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Siegfried Modola).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Sigrid von Wendel, who edits the Development Channel and Democracy in Development blogs.

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Corporate Idealism

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer Monday, May 5, 2014
Workers contracted by British Petroleum (BP) search the beach for tar balls from the Deepwater Horizon oil leak. Grand Isle, Louisiana, May 30, 2010 (Courtesy Reuters/Lee Celano). Workers contracted by British Petroleum (BP) search the beach for tar balls from the Deepwater Horizon oil leak. Grand Isle, Louisiana, May 30, 2010 (Courtesy Reuters/Lee Celano).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Christine Bader, author of The Evolution of a Corporate Idealist: When Girl Meets Oil.

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Preference for Sons Hurts Mothers

by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon Thursday, May 1, 2014
Phul Kumari with her child in India's northern state of Uttar Pradesh, October 2011 (Courtesy Reuters/TrustLaw/Nita Bhalla). Phul Kumari with her child in India's northern state of Uttar Pradesh, October 2011 (Courtesy Reuters/TrustLaw/Nita Bhalla).

For more than a century, cultural norms and traditions in India and elsewhere have favored sons over daughters—a preference based on age-old beliefs that male children add to household wealth, provide for parents and relatives in their old age, and carry the family name. Female children are viewed as financial burdens that add little value to the family and deplete income come wedding time. But while researchers have tracked the ramifications of son preference and male-biased sex ratios at birth, little is known of the effects of the bias on adult female mortality.

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Water Abundance Is Within Reach

by Guest Blogger for Isobel Coleman Wednesday, April 30, 2014
Children play around a communal tap servicing the Imizamo Yethu community near Cape Town, South Africa, August 2002 (Courtesy Reuters/ Mike Hutchings). Children play around a communal tap servicing the Imizamo Yethu community near Cape Town, South Africa, August 2002 (Courtesy Reuters/ Mike Hutchings).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Efrat Peled, Chairman and CEO of Arison Investments, which creates long-term business investments that combine substantial financial results with sustainable moral responsibility.

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