CFR Presents

Development Channel

Issues and innovations in global economic development

The Role of Government in Agriculture

by Guest Blogger for Isobel Coleman Tuesday, July 22, 2014
A farmer harvests tobacco in Harare, Zimbabwe, January 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Philimon Bulawayo). A farmer harvests tobacco in Harare, Zimbabwe, January 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Philimon Bulawayo).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Evan Axelrad, a recent graduate of the Master of Public Policy program at University of California Berkeley and former program specialist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Foreign Agriculture Service. He has also consulted with organizations including the International Fund for Agricultural Development and Kiva Microfunds.

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How Kerry’s Election Deal Can Help Afghan Women

by Catherine Powell Saturday, July 19, 2014
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (L) and Afghanistan's presidential candidates Ashraf Ghani (C) and Abdullah Abdullah hold their arms in the air together after announcing a deal for the auditing of all Afghan election votes at the United Nations Compund in Kabul, July 12, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Jim Bourg). U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (L) and Afghanistan's presidential candidates Ashraf Ghani (C) and Abdullah Abdullah hold their arms in the air together after announcing a deal for the auditing of all Afghan election votes at the United Nations Compund in Kabul, July 12, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Jim Bourg).

The deal that Secretary of State John Kerry recently brokered to recount votes in Afghanistan’s disputed presidential election demonstrates the United States still has a stake in the future of the war-torn country. Read more »

The Status of Women and Girls in Iraq and Afghanistan

by Catherine Powell and Guest Blogger for Isobel Coleman Thursday, July 3, 2014
Veiled women walk past a billboard that carries a verse from Koran urging women to wear a hijab in the Islamic State-controlled northern province of Raqqa, Iraq, March 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Stringer). Veiled women walk past a billboard that carries a verse from Koran urging women to wear a hijab in the Islamic State-controlled northern province of Raqqa, Iraq, March 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Stringer).

This post is by Catherine Powell, fellow for CFR’s Women and Foreign Policy Program; and Amelia Wolf, research associate for CFR’s Center for Preventive Action and International Institutions and Global Governance Program.

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Segovia: A New Player in Cash Transfers

by Isobel Coleman Friday, June 20, 2014
Customers are seen at mobile money transfers kiosks, known as M-Pesa agents, near Ngong township in the outskirts of Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 15, 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Thomas Mukoya). Customers are seen at mobile money transfers kiosks, known as M-Pesa agents, near Ngong township in the outskirts of Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 15, 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Thomas Mukoya).

For several years now I’ve been following the progress of an innovative new philanthropy: GiveDirectly. Its cofounders, Michael Faye and Paul Niehaus, started the organization in 2008 while doing their PhD’s in economics at Harvard. Their idea was simple. Given mounting evidence that cash transfers are among the most efficient and effective ways to address poverty (and that the poor know very well what to do with money), why not start a charity that skips the rigmarole of providing services to poor people in poor countries and just gives them cash?

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Women and Girls in the Afghanistan Transition

by Catherine Powell Thursday, June 19, 2014
An Afghan woman walks inside a police compound in Herat province, Afghanistan, March 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Mohmmad Shoib). An Afghan woman walks inside a police compound in Herat province, Afghanistan, March 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Mohmmad Shoib).

When the Taliban were in power in Afghanistan, they shuttered girls’ schools, segregated many aspects of public life, including the workplace, and prevented women from leaving their homes unless accompanied by a male relative escort. Since those dark days, Afghan women and girls have pushed diligently to expand their rights and remove gender restrictions on access to education, work, and health care. Read more »

Leading Green Finance in Bolivia

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer Tuesday, June 17, 2014
A worker looks at lemons at a plant in Cuatro Cañadas, Bolivia, December 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/David Mercado). A worker looks at lemons at a plant in Cuatro Cañadas, Bolivia, December 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/David Mercado).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is by Heidi Sumser, senior associate at A2F Consulting in Washington, D.C., and former environmental management coordinator at Banco Los Andes ProCredit, Bolivia.

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The Status of Women and Girls in the World Today

by Isobel Coleman Saturday, May 31, 2014
A protester addresses the "Bring Back Our Girls" protest group as they march to the presidential villa to deliver a protest letter to Nigeria's President Goodluck Jonathan in Abuja, calling for the release of the Nigerian schoolgirls in Chibok who were kidnapped by Islamist militant group Boko Haram, May 22, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Afolabi Sotunde). A protester addresses the "Bring Back Our Girls" protest group as they march to the presidential villa to deliver a protest letter to Nigeria's President Goodluck Jonathan in Abuja, calling for the release of the Nigerian schoolgirls in Chibok who were kidnapped by Islamist militant group Boko Haram, May 22, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Afolabi Sotunde).

How terrible is it to be born a girl in the world today? The almost daily headlines about cruel acts of violence and discrimination against women — from the kidnapping of nearly 300 school girls in Nigeria last month, to the latest gruesome stoning of a woman in Pakistan – provide plenty of reasons to be pessimistic about women’s equality and safety in today’s world.

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World Bank Report on Women’s Empowerment Breaks New Ground

by Isobel Coleman Friday, May 16, 2014
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, UN Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim, and Council on Foreign Relations Senior Fellow Isobel Coleman participate in an event on empowering woman and girls at the World Bank in Washington, D.C., May 14, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Jonathan Ernst). Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, UN Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim, and Council on Foreign Relations Senior Fellow Isobel Coleman participate in an event on empowering woman and girls at the World Bank in Washington, D.C., May 14, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Jonathan Ernst).

Over the past several decades, the World Bank has been an important thought leader on the value of investing in women and girls. In 2001, the Bank released a seminal report, “Engendering Development – Through Gender Equality in Rights, Resources, and Voice,” which made the incontrovertible case that investing in girls’ education and other aspects of female empowerment is critical for poverty alleviation. More recently, in 2012, the Bank devoted its annual World Development Report to women and girls, highlighting that, despite gains, gender gaps persist and greater gender equality is critical to growth.

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Financial Inclusion: A New Common Ground for Central Banks

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer Monday, May 12, 2014
Customers are seen at mobile money transfers kiosks, known as M-Pesa agents, near Nairobi, Kenya, July 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Thomas Mukoya). Customers are seen at mobile money transfers kiosks, known as M-Pesa agents, near Nairobi, Kenya, July 2013 (Courtesy Reuters/Thomas Mukoya).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Alfred Hannig, executive director of the Alliance for Financial Inclusion.

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An Alliance to Measure What Matters: Governance and the Post-2015 Development Agenda

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer Monday, May 12, 2014
Riot policemen shield themselves as fireworks thrown by protesters explode next to the statue of a bull during an anti-government, anti-corruption protest in Istanbul, Turkey, March 11, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Stringer). Riot policemen shield themselves as fireworks thrown by protesters explode next to the statue of a bull during an anti-government, anti-corruption protest in Istanbul, Turkey, March 11, 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Stringer).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article from Alicia Phillips Mandaville, managing director of Development Policy at the Millennium Challenge Corporation, is part of an ongoing Development Channel series on global justice and development.

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