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Development Channel

Issues and innovations in global economic development

Innovation in Development

by Rachel Vogelstein Tuesday, July 21, 2015
Pregnant women holding their prescription papers wait to be examined at a government-run hospital in the northeastern Indian city of Agartala March 17, 2015. India is betting on cheap mobile phones to cut some of the world's highest rates of maternal and child deaths, as it rolls out a campaign of voice messages delivering health advice to pregnant women and mothers. Amid a scarcity of doctors and public hospitals, India is relying on its mobile telephone network, the second largest in the world with 950 million connections, to reach places where health workers rarely go. REUTERS/Jayanta Dey Pregnant women holding their prescription papers wait to be examined at a government-run hospital in the northeastern Indian city of Agartala March 17, 2015. India is betting on cheap mobile phones to cut some of the world's highest rates of maternal and child deaths, as it rolls out a campaign of voice messages delivering health advice to pregnant women and mothers. Amid a scarcity of doctors and public hospitals, India is relying on its mobile telephone network, the second largest in the world with 950 million connections, to reach places where health workers rarely go. REUTERS/Jayanta Dey

Amidst final negotiations over the Sustainable Development Goals, both private and public sector development funders are turning their attention to the gap between this ambitious agenda and available resources. Last week, government, business, and NGO representatives gathered in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for the Third Financing for Development Conference to devise ways to support this new development agenda. One proposal is to support innovation to fuel cost-effective approaches to development.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Financing for Development, Pope in Latin America, Arrests in Egypt and China

by Shannon K. O'Neil Friday, July 17, 2015
Pope Francis waves while visiting the Banado Norte neighborhood in Asuncion, Paraguay, July 12, 2015. REUTERS/Lucas Nunez Pope Francis waves while visiting the Banado Norte neighborhood in Asuncion, Paraguay, July 12, 2015. REUTERS/Lucas Nunez

This is a post in a new series on the Development Channel,“This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each week, CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program will highlight noteworthy events and articles.

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The UN’s Third Financing for Development Conference: After Growth & Aid, What Comes Next?

by Shannon K. O'Neil Thursday, July 16, 2015
U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon addresses the opening of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development in Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa, July 13, 2015 (Tiksa Neger, Reuters). U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon addresses the opening of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development in Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa, July 13, 2015 (Tiksa Neger, Reuters).

Governments, civil society groups, and business leaders are gathered this week in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for the UN’s Third Financing for Development Conference (FFD3). Up for debate is how to fund the Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs, a new set of global development indicators that the UN will adopt in September.

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Can the Chibok Girls Be Held Accountable for Boko Haram’s Atrocities?

by Catherine Powell Thursday, July 16, 2015
Children rescued from Boko Haram in Sambisa forest react at a clinic at the internally displaced people's camp in Yola, Nigeria, May 2015 (Afolabi Sotunde/Reuters). Children rescued from Boko Haram in Sambisa forest react at a clinic at the internally displaced people's camp in Yola, Nigeria, May 2015 (Afolabi Sotunde/Reuters).

It has been nearly fifteen months since Boko Haram abducted nearly three hundred girls from a secondary school in Chibok, Nigeria, sparking the #BringBackOurGirls campaign on Twitter. Since then, reports have surfaced that the girls have been sold, forcibly converted to Islam, and married to terrorist group members. Dozens of the girls managed to escape, but despite efforts to secure the release of the remaining 219 captives, no agreement has come through.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Development Debate, Modi Controls India’s Narrative, and Reigning in Civil Society

by Shannon K. O'Neil Thursday, July 9, 2015
India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi attends an event organised by the Christian community to celebrate the beatification of two Indians by Pope Francis late last year, in New Delhi February 17, 2015. Modi vowed on Tuesday to protect all religious groups, an apparent response to a series of attacks on Christian institutions in New Delhi fueling concerns that minorities are being targeted by Hindu zealots. (Stringer/Reuters) India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi attends an event organised by the Christian community to celebrate the beatification of two Indians by Pope Francis late last year, in New Delhi February 17, 2015. Modi vowed on Tuesday to protect all religious groups, an apparent response to a series of attacks on Christian institutions in New Delhi fueling concerns that minorities are being targeted by Hindu zealots. (Stringer/Reuters)

This is a post in a new series on the Development Channel,“This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each week, CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program will highlight noteworthy events and articles.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Cost of Tax Evasion, Curbing Corruption, and Labor Rights

by Shannon K. O'Neil Thursday, July 2, 2015
A labourer works at the construction site of a residential complex in Kolkata, December 21, 2013 (Rupak De Chowdhuri/Reuters). A laborer works at the construction site of a residential complex in Kolkata, December 21, 2013 (Rupak De Chowdhuri/Reuters).

This is a post of a new series on the Development Channel,“This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each Friday, CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program will highlight the week’s noteworthy events and articles.

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Gender Equality and the Sustainable Development Goals

by Rachel Vogelstein Tuesday, June 30, 2015
UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon speaks during a closing ceremony of the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development summit in Rio de Janeiro June 22, 2012. Ueslei Marcelino/Courtesy Reuters UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon speaks during a closing ceremony of the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development summit in Rio de Janeiro June 22, 2012. Ueslei Marcelino/Courtesy Reuters

This year—2015—is an auspicious moment for global development. In September, as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) expire, UN member states will adopt a new framework that will guide international development over the next fifteen years. In advance of the fall summit on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)—as well as the upcoming Third International Financing for Development Conference in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia—I hosted Thomas Gass, assistant secretary-general for policy coordination and inter-agency affairs at the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, and Ambassador Elizabeth Cousens, deputy chief executive officer at the United Nations Foundation and former U.S. chief negotiator on the SDGs, to discuss gender equality and the future of the international development agenda.

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Beyond the Millennium Development Goals: Strengthening Health Systems for Sustainability

by Guest Blogger for Shannon K. O'Neil Monday, June 29, 2015
A man walks by a mural with health instructions on treating the Ebola virus, in Monrovia, November 18, 2014. (James Giahyue/Reuters) A man walks by a mural with health instructions on treating the Ebola virus, in Monrovia, November 18, 2014. (James Giahyue/Reuters)

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Amit Chandra, an emergency physician and global health consultant based in Washington, DC.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: African Progress, EU Transparency, Term Limits, Foreign Aid, and War Crimes

by Shannon K. O'Neil Friday, June 26, 2015
Nepal's Prime Minister Sushil Koirala greets upon his arrival to take part in the International Conference of Nepal Reconstruction in Kathmandu, June 25, 2015. According to the local media report the government expects big aid pledge from the donors taking part in the conference for rebuilding Nepal after the earthquake. (Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters) Nepal's Prime Minister Sushil Koirala greets upon his arrival to take part in the International Conference of Nepal Reconstruction in Kathmandu, June 25, 2015. According to the local media report the government expects big aid pledge from the donors taking part in the conference for rebuilding Nepal after the earthquake. (Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters)

This post is part of the series, “This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each Friday, CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program, will highlight the week’s noteworthy events and articles.

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Progress on Implementing UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace, and Security

by Catherine Powell Wednesday, June 24, 2015
Afghan National Army (ANA) female officers take part in a training exercise at the Kabul Military Training Centre (KMTC) in Kabul, October 8, 2013. (Omar Sobhani/Reuters) Afghan National Army (ANA) female officers take part in a training exercise at the Kabul Military Training Centre (KMTC) in Kabul, October 8, 2013. (Omar Sobhani/Reuters)

This year marks the fifteenth anniversary of UN Security Council Resolution 1325, a landmark resolution recognizing the importance of women as leaders in the peace and security sector, not merely as victims of conflict. I recently hosted Nahla Valji—the head of women, peace, and security work at UN Women—to discuss international progress on the resolution and the U.S. role in its implementation.

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