Benn Steil


A graphical take on geoeconomic issues, with links to the news and expert commentary.

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Showing posts for "Europe"

How Low Can Mario Go?

by Benn Steil and Emma Smith

In September 2014 the European Central Bank lowered its deposit rate to an all-time low of -0.2 percent, after which ECB President Mario Draghi declared that rates were “now at the lower bound.” What he meant by this was that, by the ECB’s calculations, banks would find holding cash more attractive than an ECB deposit at rates below -0.2 percent, so there was no scope for encouraging banks to lend by pushing this rate lower. The ECB therefore turned to asset purchases, whose efficacy is much in debate, in an effort to ease policy further. Read more »

As Fed Pulls Back, the ECB and BoJ Add Trillions to Global Liquidity

by Benn Steil and Emma Smith
global liquidity - updated

All eyes and ears are on the Fed as it ponders its first rate increase in nine years.  IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde fears a rerun of the 2013 “taper tantrum,” or what we have been calling a rate ruckus. Emerging markets are clearly vulnerable to renewed outflows, as capital chases higher yields in the U.S. and drives up the cost of dollar funding abroad. Read more »

Greece Fallout: Italy and Spain Have Funded a Massive Backdoor Bailout of French Banks

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker
Greece France Spain and Italy

In March 2010, two months before the announcement of the first Greek bailout, European banks had €134 billion worth of claims on Greece.  French banks, as shown in the right-hand figure above, had by far the largest exposure: €52 billion – this was 1.6 times that of Germany, eleven times that of Italy, and sixty-two times that of Spain. Read more »

Greece and Its Creditors Should Do a Guns-For-Pensions Deal

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker
Greece NATO Defense Spending

IMF Chief Economist Olivier Blanchard has said that Greece needs to slash pension spending by 1% of GDP in order to reach its new budget targets.  The Greek government continues to resist, arguing that Greeks dependent on pensions have already suffered enough.  But it has yet to put a compelling alternative to its creditors. Read more »

Greece-Troika Gap Over Primary Surpluses Has Shrunk Dramatically

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker
Greece Primary Surplus IMF Troika

Greece has announced that it will not pay the IMF the €300 million due to the Fund on June 5.  Instead, it will “bundle” the payments due to the Fund over the course of June into one payment of about €1.7 billion that it will make at the end of the month.  This contradicts earlier pledges that it would not resort to bundling.  The only country ever to have done so is Zambia, three decades ago. Read more »

Move Over Big Mac: The Law of One Price Is Lovin’ Our Little Mac Index

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker

The “law of one price” holds that identical goods should trade for the same price in an efficient market. To what extent does it hold internationally?

The Economist magazine’s famous Big Mac Index uses the price of McDonald’s burgers around the world, expressed in a common currency (U.S. dollars), to estimate the extent to which various currencies are over- or under-valued. The Big Mac is a global product, identical across borders, which makes it an interesting one for this purpose. Yet it travels badly—cross-border flows of burgers won’t align their prices internationally. Read more »

The Politics of IMF Crisis-Country Growth Projections

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker
IMF growth projections vs reality Greece and Ukraine

IMF GDP growth “projections” accompanying emergency lending programs are nothing of the sort; they are targets the level of which is necessarily set high enough to enable the interventions.

Take Greece.  After committing to lending of €30 billion over 3 years in 2010, the Fund projected that the crisis-mired nation would return to growth by 2012.  As shown in the left figure above, Greece’s economy actually plunged by 7% that year – the year it completed the world’s largest sovereign restructuring, covering €206 billion of bonds. Read more »