Benn Steil

Geo-Graphics

A graphical take on geoeconomic issues, with links to the news and expert commentary.

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Showing posts for "Japan"

What If Japan Becomes Treasury’s First Currency ‘Manipulator’ in 22 Years?

by Benn Steil and Emma Smith
Japan currency

In May, Japanese Finance Minister Taro Aso and colleagues warned of their willingness to intervene in currency markets to counteract upward pressure on the yen.  And in the wake of Britain’s historic Brexit vote on June 23, which prompted another surge in the currency, even Prime Minister Shinzo Abe joined the chorus. Read more »

The World Economy is Running on Monetary Fumes

by Benn Steil and Emma Smith
Global monetary policy rates

With global growth stalling, the IMF is calling for more assertive policy action to boost it.  In normal times, monetary stimulus is—even for liberal Keynesians like Paul Krugman—sufficient to address deficient demand.  But these are most surely not normal times. Read more »

Has the Fed Become More Accommodative than the ECB and BoJ?

by Benn Steil and Emma Smith
Real vs. Nominal Interest Rates

A Japanese interest-rate strategist recently told the Wall Street Journal that “every day is like being Alice in Wonderland” since the Bank of Japan’s foray into negative deposit rates on January 29. Though the yen initially fell, as the BoJ wanted, it reversed course quickly.  The yen has of late been trading near 18-month highs.  What is going on? Read more »

Our Mini Mac Index Flame-Broils The Economist—Yet Again

by Benn Steil and Emma Smith
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The “law of one price” holds that identical goods should trade for the same price in an efficient market.  But to what extent does it actually hold internationally?

The Economist magazine’s famous Big Mac Index uses the price of McDonald’s Big Macs around the world, expressed in a common currency (U.S. dollars), to estimate the extent to which various currencies are over- or under-valued. The Big Mac is a global product, identical across borders, which makes it an interesting one for this purpose. Read more »

As Fed Pulls Back, the ECB and BoJ Add Trillions to Global Liquidity

by Benn Steil and Emma Smith
global liquidity - updated

All eyes and ears are on the Fed as it ponders its first rate increase in nine years.  IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde fears a rerun of the 2013 “taper tantrum,” or what we have been calling a rate ruckus. Emerging markets are clearly vulnerable to renewed outflows, as capital chases higher yields in the U.S. and drives up the cost of dollar funding abroad. Read more »

Should the United States Encourage Japan to Join the AIIB?

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker
AIIB possible voting structure

On April 15, China’s finance ministry revealed the 57 “prospective founding members” of the new Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, of which China is the architect.   The likely founders include many U.S. allies, such as the UK, Australia, and South Korea, which the Obama Administration had lobbied not to join, seeing the AIIB as a Chinese alternative to the U.S.-architected World Bank. Read more »

Move Over Big Mac: The Law of One Price Is Lovin’ Our Little Mac Index

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker
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The “law of one price” holds that identical goods should trade for the same price in an efficient market. To what extent does it hold internationally?

The Economist magazine’s famous Big Mac Index uses the price of McDonald’s burgers around the world, expressed in a common currency (U.S. dollars), to estimate the extent to which various currencies are over- or under-valued. The Big Mac is a global product, identical across borders, which makes it an interesting one for this purpose. Yet it travels badly—cross-border flows of burgers won’t align their prices internationally. Read more »

The New Geo-Graphics iPad Mini Index Should Calm Talk of Currency Wars

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker

The “law of one price” holds that identical goods should trade for the same price in an efficient market.  To what extent does it hold internationally?

The Economist magazine’s famous Big Mac Index uses the price of McDonalds’ burgers around the world, expressed in a common currency (U.S. dollars), to estimate the extent to which various currencies are over- or under-valued.  The Big Mac is a global product, identical across borders, which makes it an interesting one for this purpose.  Yet it travels badly – cross-border flows of burgers won’t align their prices internationally. Read more »

Beware Friendly Fire in the Currency Wars

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker
imports and inflation

Prominent economic commentators have argued the cases for significantly weaker currencies in each of the world’s major economies – in particular, the United States, the eurozone, Japan, and the UK. As these four economies represent over half of the global economy, it’s clear that they can’t all accomplish this feat. It’s also far from clear that they should all want to. Read more »

A GDP-Based IMF Would Boost China’s Voice . . . and America’s

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker
reallocation

Since its creation after the 1944 Bretton Woods conference, membership of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has grown from 29 countries to 188.  Representation, in terms of votes and quotas, has also become less connected with the relative weights of each country in the global economy.  As today’s Geo-Graphic shows, China would be by far the biggest beneficiary of an IMF voting reallocation based purely on gross domestic product, gaining eight percentage points.  What is much less well known, however, is that the United States would be the second biggest beneficiary, well above third-place Japan and fourth-place Brazil.  As the United States already has enough votes to wield unique veto power, this would have little practical effect on its already enormous influence.  But it does explain why the United States has been consistently more aligned with the so-called BRIC developing nations on IMF reform than with its fellow rich nations in Europe. Read more »