Benn Steil

Geo-Graphics

A graphical take on geoeconomic issues, with links to the news and expert commentary.

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Showing posts for "Campaign 2016"

Mini Mac Trumps the Big Mac

by Benn Steil and Emma Smith

The “law of one price” holds that identical goods should trade for the same price in an efficient market.  But how well does it actually hold internationally? The Economist magazine’s famous Big Mac Index uses the price of McDonald’s Big Macs around the world, expressed in a common currency (U.S. dollars), to measure the extent to which various currencies are over- or under-valued. The Big Mac is a global product, identical across borders, which makes it an interesting one for this purpose. Read more »

Is the Emerging Market Currency Plunge Really About Trade?

by Benn Steil and Emma Smith

Emerging market (EM) assets have taken a beating since Donald Trump’s surprise election victory on November 8.  EM bond prices are down 4.4 percent, equities 4.6 percent, and currencies 4.1 percent.  But is this really, as the Financial Times proclaimed, about “fears of trade protectionism”? Read more »

History Shows Trump’s Trade Policy Is a Recipe for Recession

by Benn Steil and Emma Smith

The central theme of Donald Trump’s economic policy is trade.  He promises to slash America’s trade deficit by tearing up international agreements and imposing massive new tariffs on imports from China (45%) and Mexico (35%).  By cutting the trade deficit from $500 billion to zero, according to his senior economic advisers, $1.74 trillion in new tax revenue will accrue to the Treasury over the next decade.  Trump will use this massive windfall to fund two-thirds of his proposed tax cuts.  If true, this will indeed go some way toward Making America Great Again. Read more »

What If Japan Becomes Treasury’s First Currency ‘Manipulator’ in 22 Years?

by Benn Steil and Emma Smith

In May, Japanese Finance Minister Taro Aso and colleagues warned of their willingness to intervene in currency markets to counteract upward pressure on the yen.  And in the wake of Britain’s historic Brexit vote on June 23, which prompted another surge in the currency, even Prime Minister Shinzo Abe joined the chorus. Read more »

Consumer Confidence Suggests Clinton Victory in November

by Benn Steil and Emma Smith

Going back to 1952, consumer confidence has been a fair guide to presidential election outcomes. Confidence has been 12 points higher on average in years the incumbent party has won than in years the opposition party has won.  The difference is statistically significant at the 1 percent level.  As shown in the graphic above, average confidence over 2016 to date is right at the average level for an incumbent party victory.  This is good news for Hillary Clinton—though there is still plenty of time for bad news to boost Donald Trump.