Benn Steil

Geo-Graphics

A graphical take on geoeconomic issues, with links to the news and expert commentary.

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Showing posts for "Financial Markets"

A Dovish Market Has History on Its Side in Tuning Out the Fed

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker
Fed Transition Times

Market expectations for Fed policy have been decidedly more dovish than the Fed itself, a conundrum that is concerning San Francisco Fed economists.  As the Fed debates its rate-liftoff forward guidance this week, however, it is worth asking how much it really matters. Read more »

French Banks Play Russian Roulette

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker
bank exposure to russia

In the fourth quarter of last year, with tensions rising between Russia and the West over Ukraine, U.S., German, UK, and Swedish banks aggressively dialed down their credit exposures in Russia.  But as the graphic above shows, French banks, which have by far the highest exposures to Russia, barely touched theirs.  At $50 billion, this exposure is not far off the $70 billion exposure they had to Greece in 2010.  At that time, they took advantage of the European Central Bank’s generous Securities Market Programme (SMP) to fob off Greek bonds, effectively mutualizing their Greek exposures across the Eurozone.  No such program will be available for Russian debt.  And much of France’s Russia exposure is illiquid, such as Société Générale’s ownership of Rosbank, Russia’s 9th largest bank by asset value ($22 billion).  With the Obama Administration and the European Union threatening to dial up sanctions on Russia, is it time for U.S. money market funds and others to start worrying about their French bank exposures? Read more »

IMF Reform and Ukraine: Amateur Hour for U.S. Economic Diplomacy

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker
ukraine imf reform

In our March 5 post, we argued that the Obama administration linking Ukraine aid to IMF reform was disingenuous and counterproductive.  We were right: the legislation failed, congressional Republicans were angered, foreign governments were annoyed, and aid was delayed.  All for what?  Without IMF reform, Ukraine will still get every penny it would have gotten with IMF reform.  Today’s Geo-Graphic shows this.  And more… Read more »

Which Fed Guidance Should We Believe?

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker
forward guidance

In October 2012, the Fed issued what came to be called a “pledge” to keep its target interest rate near zero through mid-2015.  The market immediately reacted as the Fed wanted, centering expectations on a rate hike in mid-2015.

At its next meeting, the Fed abandoned date-based guidance in favor of data-based guidance: a pledge to keep rates near zero until the unemployment rate fell below 6.5%.  The Fed emphasized, however, that the two pledges were consistent, as it didn’t expect unemployment to fall below that level until mid-2015. Read more »

Why the Labor Data Point to a September Fed Taper

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker
LPFR and discouraged workers

The August “jobs report is an important reminder that all this tapering talk is insane and dangerous,” pronounced Slate economics writer Matt Yglesias, reflecting the consensus of the econo-commentariat.  But as today’s Geo-Graphic shows, the report is actually wholly consistent with a September Fed taper. Read more »

Mortgages and Monetary Policy Don’t Mix

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker
QE and Mortgage Rates

From the beginning of 2009 through this past May 21st, the Fed amassed a portfolio of mortgage-backed securities (MBS) valued at $1.2 trillion.  Over this period, the average 30-year fixed mortgage rate fell from 5.33% to 3.65%, and the spread between that rate and the 10-year government borrowing rate fell from 2.8 percentage points to 1.7 percentage points. Read more »

The New Geo-Graphics iPad Mini Index Should Calm Talk of Currency Wars

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker

The “law of one price” holds that identical goods should trade for the same price in an efficient market.  To what extent does it hold internationally?

The Economist magazine’s famous Big Mac Index uses the price of McDonalds’ burgers around the world, expressed in a common currency (U.S. dollars), to estimate the extent to which various currencies are over- or under-valued.  The Big Mac is a global product, identical across borders, which makes it an interesting one for this purpose.  Yet it travels badly – cross-border flows of burgers won’t align their prices internationally. Read more »

Is the Fed Right to Calibrate Asset Purchases to Economic Data?

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker
recalibration

The Fed is trying to have its cake and eat it too. Having earlier tried to anchor market expectations of future low interest rates by pledging that policy would remain accommodative into 2015, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke is now saying that the Fed will consider “a recalibration of the pace of its [asset] purchases . . . in light of incoming information.” Read more »

Can China’s Bond Market Support a Global RMB?

by Benn Steil and Dinah Walker
RMB

On April 24, the Australian central bank announced that it would raise the proportion of its reserves devoted to Chinese financial assets from 0% to 5%, likely among the highest such allocations among world central banks.  Will other major central banks follow suit? Read more »