Ed Husain

The Arab Street

Husain examines politics, society, and radicalism in the greater Middle East.

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Pakistan Loses an Ambassador

by Ed Husain
January 30, 2012

Pakistan's former ambassador to the United States, Husain Haqqani, leaves after appearing before a Supreme Court commission in Islamabad on January 9, 2012 (Faisal Mahmood/Courtesy Reuters). Pakistan's former ambassador to the United States, Husain Haqqani, leaves after appearing before a Supreme Court commission in Islamabad on January 9, 2012 (Faisal Mahmood/Courtesy Reuters).

It is a sad day for Pakistan when one of its brightest minds and best ambassadors, Husain Haqqani, has to escape the country in a private airline after spending several weeks under effective house arrest. His crime? Not towing the line of the all-powerful military establishment in Pakistan.

Haqqani was ambassador to the United States from 2008 to 2011, which included the Osama bin Laden killing and defending Pakistan in the eyes of the world. He represented his besieged nation supremely well, and was acutely aware of the games of the ISI. Forced to resign over the so-called Memogate scandal, he returned to a divided Pakistan. To many he was a hero, to some a traitor.

He returns to the United States at a critical time. What he could not do in office, he can do now: raise public and political awareness of the Machiavellian activities of Pakistan’s military intelligence community. If Pakistan is to become a functioning democracy, then the military will need to become genuinely subordinate to civilian government. Husain Haqqani can help Pakistan achieve this democratic aim.

1 Comment

  • Posted by Uzair arif

    “If Pakistan is to become a functioning democracy, then the military will need to become genuinely subordinate to civilian government. Husain Haqqani can help Pakistan achieve this democratic aim”

    This democratic aim must not be achieved by asking the foreign army general to help rein over the one’s country’s army.