Robert Kahn

Macro and Markets

Robert Kahn analyzes economic policies for an integrated world.

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Showing posts for "Fiscal Policy"

A Roadmap for Ukraine

by Jennifer M. Harris and Robert Kahn

U.S. and European efforts to resolve the Ukraine crisis seem to be finding their stride in recent days. U.S. Secretary of Defense Ash Carter ended months of “will they won’t they?” by announcing earlier this week that the U.S. would be sending heavy weaponry into Eastern Europe, and late last week EU leaders declared that EU sanctions against Russia would remain in place through the end of 2016, quelling months of anxiety around whether EU resolve on sanctions would hold.

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Greece: Still No Deal

by Robert Kahn
Greece: Still No Deal Critical decisions will likely have to wait for the next finance ministers’ gathering. (Paul Hanna/Reuters)

European finance ministers met earlier today and afterwards stated that new proposals from the Greek government were “broadly comprehensive” and “a solid basis” for restarting talks, but made clear that the Greek plan was far from complete and received too late for a deal to be concluded today. Markets had rallied earlier on hopes of a deal. But they fell back on comments from German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schauble and others who saw little new in the Greek proposal, suggesting significant splits among creditors. Leaders meet this evening, but it now appears that critical decisions will wait for the next finance ministers’ gathering, likely Thursday. Separately, the European Central Bank’s (ECB) board again expanded emergency assistance by 2 billion euros to Greek banks after weekend ATM withdrawals and orders for today reportedly exceeded 1.4 billion euros. With today’s modestly constructive statements though, it will be difficult for the ECB to cut off access to Greek banks over the next few days even in the face of broad insolvency in the Greek financial system.

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Greece’s Bridge to Nowhere

by Robert Kahn
Greece's Bridge to Nowhere Last week, Greece delayed a $338 million payment to the IMF as negotiations stalled. (Grigoris Siamidis/Reuters)

Negotiations continue today between Greece and its creditors, with reports that the government has presented a revised proposal that offers minor concessions in an effort to break the deadlock. A deal is needed in the next week if a package of assistance is to be put in place before end-month payments of $1.7 billion are due to the IMF. While this is not a hard deadline—a short-term default to the IMF need not sink the Greek economy—the government is out of cash and it is hard to imagine how they make critical domestic payments without an injection of cash from creditors.

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Greece and the Politics of Arrears

by Robert Kahn
Merkel-Tsipras German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras review an honour guard during a welcoming ceremony at the Chancellery in Berlin on March 23, 2015. (Pawel Kopczynski/Courtesy Reuters)

Greece is running out of money. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras’s meeting this week with German Chancellor Angela Merkel has taken some of the toxicity out of the conversation for now, but cannot mask Greece’s current collision course with its creditors. Committed to a platform on which it was elected but that it cannot pay for, and with additional EU/ECB financing conditioned on reform, the Greek government is likely to run out of money in April (if not before). If past emerging market crises are any guide, the decisions that it will then confront about who to pay and who not to—the politics of arrears—will present a critical challenge to the government and likely define the future path of the crisis.

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G20 Worries About Growth

by Robert Kahn

The central message from the G20 Summit in Brisbane last weekend was the need for more growth, and there was a clear sense after the meeting that leaders are worried. David Cameron captured the mood with his statement that “red warning lights are flashing on the dashboard of the global economy” and his concern about “a dangerous backdrop of instability and uncertainty.” While Europe came in for the most criticism (Christine Lagarde rightly worries that high debt, low growth and unemployment may yet become “the new normal in Europe”) concerns about growth in Japan and emerging markets also weighed on leaders. In the end, though, the diplomacy conducted on the sidelines was more meaningful than the growth proposals put forward at the summit.

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Japan’s Sensible Fiscal Retreat

by Robert Kahn

Surprisingly poor second quarter growth numbers in Japan have raised market expectations that there will be snap elections and a delay in the consumption tax hike that was scheduled for October 2015. GDP fell for a second consecutive quarter, by 1.6 percent (q/q, a.r), versus market expectations of a 2.2 percent increase. A huge miss. Falling corporate inventories were a large part of the story, but exports rose only modestly while household consumption and capital spending slowed. The yen sold off after the announcement, reaching a low of 117 against the dollar. Japanese stocks are higher.

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The International Economic Agenda Facing the New Congress

by Robert Kahn

The initial post-election talk is understandably about whether the shift to a Republican controlled Senate makes it easier or harder to make progress on central economic challenges facing the United States, including energy, immigration, social spending, and infrastructure. There is understandable concern that this next Congress will face the same gridlock that we have now. But even before that, there is the mundane issue of what we borrow and spend. Partly out of fear of being seen as crying wolf one too many times, I have been wary to advertise my concern that we are facing a new series of economic cliffs. First up is a likely standoff on the budget (in December, and likely again in the spring of 2015). Then comes the debt limit, which will be reset on March 15, but given the usual and not-terribly-extraordinary “extraordinary measures” that are at the disposal of Treasury, they can likely pay the nation’s bills until perhaps the fall of 2015 before cash balances fall to zero. Of course, in the past deals have been done, often at the last minute, and we have not, with the exception of the 2013 government shutdown, gone off the cliff (though there have been a few unnecessary fender benders along the way). But with the Senate as polarized as ever, it is easy to see getting to deals on these issues will be difficult and potentially unsettling to markets.

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