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Energy, Security, and Climate

CFR experts examine the science and foreign policy surrounding climate change, energy, and nuclear security.

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Showing posts for "Energy Security"

Road Warriors Face an Uphill Battle

by Blake Clayton

Gasoline prices are the talk of the town right now. Lots of stories are circulating about where prices are on a historical basis and what this summer might bring. $4 a gallon? $5? Some have predicted even $6 a gallon. Wait, it gets better. You’d think you were at a horse auction the way analysts are talking these days. Read more »

The Hidden U.S. Export Boom

by Blake Clayton

Before I launch into the post, I thought it might be good for me to introduce myself to you readers, since I’m going to be blogging pretty regularly in the coming months. I joined CFR last October as a fellow for energy and national security as part of a larger Sloan Foundation-funded initiative, the Program on Energy and National Security. I’m delighted to be a part of the CFR and am looking forward to working on this new energy program. Read more »

Incoherent Thinking About an Iranian Oil Embargo

by Michael Levi

In the not so distant future – indeed perhaps only months from now – the United States and Europe may enact a mix of sanctions against the Central Bank of Iran (CBI) and Iranian oil exports as part of an effort to stall the Iranian nuclear program. Sanctions against the CBI would leave many current Iranian oil customers without any way to pay for their crude, effectively triggering a partial boycott on Iranian oil exports. Explicit sanctions would, of course, do the same. Read more »

Could Expensive Oil Be Good for America?

by Michael Levi

A basic disagreement lies at the root of many of today’s most heated energy debates: some people think that expensive oil is bad for the United States, while others think that it’s good. One side asserts that the economic benefits of cheap oil outweigh all else, while the other insists that the environmental and other damages stemming from inexpensive oil are clearly paramount. Read more »

Someone is Missing from Romney’s Foreign Policy Team

by Michael Levi

Mitt Romney unveiled an impressive list of foreign policy advisers yesterday, establishing what Josh Rogin at The Cable aptly termed a “shadow National Security Council.” Romney has created a working group to match pretty much every piece of NSC terroritory, from AfPak to Counter-Proliferation to Human Rights. There is, however, one glaring omission: unlike at the NSC, which has long had a senior director for energy, no one is responsible for energy affairs. Read more »

Separating Fact from Fiction on Keystone XL

by Michael Levi

Opposition to the Keystone XL pipeline, which would move diluted bitumen from the Canadian oil sands to the Gulf Coast, has come into full force over the past couple weeks, with over five hundred people arrested at protests in DC. I’ve written extensively regarding how both sides of the oil sands debate exaggerate their arguments; in reality, the oil sands are neither a climate catastrophe nor an energy security bonanza.

As opposition has ramped up, though, pipeline opponents have gone into overdrive, introducing a host of new arguments, most of which are bogus. The purpose of this post is to sort out fact from fiction when it comes to the newer claims.

Let me be clear up front that my neglect of pro-pipeline arguments here doesn’t imply approval – many of them are ridiculous too. But I’ve written about them before, and don’t want to rehash old points. Nor should this post be read as saying that those who oppose Keystone XL are necessarily wrong on the fundamental question (though I tend to lean the other way): this fight is as much about power as anything else, and in politics, power matters.

Read more »