James M. Lindsay

The Water's Edge

Lindsay analyzes the politics shaping U.S. foreign policy and the sustainability of American power.

Guest Post: Yanzhong Huang on the NCD Summit » A no-smoking poster is displayed in a restaurant in Mumbai that used to allow smoking October 2, 2008. India banned smoking in public places on Thursday in an attempt to fight tobacco use blamed, directly or indirectly, for a fifth of all deaths in the world’s third-largest consumer. The ban, which includes all offices and restaurants, will hit its estimated 240 million tobacco users, who are likely to find their homes and cars among the last few places to light up. REUTERS/Arko Datta

A no-smoking poster is displayed in a restaurant in Mumbai that used to allow smoking October 2, 2008. India banned smoking in public places on Thursday in an attempt to fight tobacco use blamed, directly or indirectly, for a fifth of all deaths in the world's third-largest consumer. The ban, which includes all offices and restaurants, will hit its estimated 240 million tobacco users, who are likely to find their homes and cars among the last few places to light up. REUTERS/Arko Datta
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