James M. Lindsay

The Water's Edge

Lindsay analyzes the politics shaping U.S. foreign policy and the sustainability of American power.

Campaign 2016 Friday Foreign Policy Roundup: Trump Gives Brexit a Thumbs Up

by James M. Lindsay Friday, June 24, 2016
Donald Trump speaks during a press conference at his golf course in Turnberry, Scotland. (Carlo Allegri/Reuters) Donald Trump speaks during a press conference at his golf course in Turnberry, Scotland. (Carlo Allegri/Reuters)

Global markets aren’t happy with the British vote to exit the European Union. But Donald Trump sure is. At a press conference for the opening of his new luxury golf resort, Trump Turnberry in western Scotland, the country where his mother was born, he called the vote “historic,” saying of British voters: Read more »

Campaign 2016 Friday Foreign Policy Roundup: The Orlando Mass Shooting Heightens Terrorism Concerns

by James M. Lindsay Friday, June 17, 2016
A rainbow flag is held up during a vigil in front of the White House. (Joshua Roberts/Reuters) A rainbow flag is held up during a vigil in front of the White House. (Joshua Roberts/Reuters)

Polls done in the wake of Sunday’s horrifying mass shooting in Orlando confirm two truths about public opinion: what Americans worry about shifts with events, and Democrats and Republicans view the world differently.

An online NBC News/Survey Monkey poll done on Monday found that 24 percent of American think that terrorism is the issue that matters the most. That’s double the 12 percent who ranked terrorism as the most important issue a week earlier. Read more »

What’s Worth Reading This Summer?

by James M. Lindsay Thursday, June 16, 2016
A visitor stands in front of a giant bookshelf at the book fair in Frankfurt, Germany, October 6, 2010.  REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach A visitor stands in front of a giant bookshelf at the book fair in Frankfurt, Germany, October 6, 2010. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

CFR.org editor Bob McMahon and I recorded our annual summer reading episode of CFR’s  “The World Next Week” podcast. Elizabeth Saunders, who is a Stanton nuclear security fellow this year at CFR and also an assistant (soon-to-be-associate) professor of political science at George Washington University here in Washington, DC, joined us for the conversation. As you would expect in a summer reading podcast, we discussed books: ones we have read, ones we plan to read, and ones we will read at the beach. Read more »

Belated Birthday Wishes to the United States Army!

by James M. Lindsay Wednesday, June 15, 2016
United States Army soldiers stand before the start of the Army's 237th anniversary celebrations at Times Square in New York on June 14, 2012. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton United States Army soldiers stand before the start of the Army's 237th anniversary celebrations at Times Square in New York on June 14, 2012. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

Yesterday the United States Army celebrated its 241st birthday. Alas, while I wrote out my birthday wishes I failed to post them. (Yes, I have been known to write cards and forget to send them.) But being a big believer in “better late than never,” here are my belated birthday to wishes to every active duty, former, or retired member of the United States Army. Read more »

Campaign 2016 Friday Foreign Policy Roundup: The American Public’s Mixed Mood

by James M. Lindsay Friday, June 10, 2016
Flags fly at the Washington Monument as the sun sets on the Capitol. (Jason Reed/Reuters) Flags fly at the Washington Monument as the sun sets on the Capitol. (Jason Reed/Reuters)

And then there were two. Nearly fifteen months after the first candidate officially declared for the presidency, we finally have our two presumptive nominees. As Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump make their pitches to voters over the next five months, they face a country that is either unsettlingly gloomy or surprisingly upbeat. Take your pick. Read more »

TWE Remembers: Memorial Day

by James M. Lindsay Monday, May 30, 2016
A soldier places flags in front of the graves at Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, DC. 
(Joshua Roberts/Reuters) A soldier places flags in front of the graves at Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, DC. (Joshua Roberts/Reuters)

The United States has fought twelve major wars and a countless number of smaller skirmishes in its history. Memorial Day is our way of honoring the soldiers, sailors, airmen, airwomen, and marines who did not return home. The holiday dates back to the months immediately following the Civil War when a few towns and cities began honoring their dead. In 1868, General John A. Logan designated May 30 as “Decoration Day,” the purpose of which would be “strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion.” The holiday was renamed Memorial Day after World War I, and its purpose became to honor all Americans who have died fighting the nation’s wars. Read more »

Campaign 2016 Friday Foreign Policy Roundup: Donald Trump Talks Energy

by James M. Lindsay Friday, May 27, 2016
Donald Trump addresses supporters in Bismarck, North Dakota. Donald Trump addresses supporters in Bismarck, North Dakota. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

Donald Trump laid out his “America First Energy Plan” yesterday at the annual Williston Basin Petroleum Conference in Bismarck, North Dakota. As with his America First foreign policy address last month, Trump made big promises and got a lot of facts wrong. Read more »

Campaign 2016 Friday Foreign Policy Roundup: It’s the Economy, Stupid

by James M. Lindsay Friday, May 20, 2016
A flag flies in front of the blast furnaces at the now-closed Bethlehem Steel mill in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. A flag flies in front of the now-closed Bethlehem Steel mill in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. (Brian Snyder/Reuters)

A Gallup poll out this week found that the economy remains the country’s top concern. Eighteen percent of Americans flag the “economy in general” as the most important problem facing the nation, while smaller percentages flag jobs (9 percent), poverty (4 percent), and the gap between rich and poor (4 percent). Foreign policy issues fall farther down the list, with 4 percent of Americans pointing to terrorism and another 4 percent pointing to national security as the most important problem. Read more »

Campaign 2016 Friday Foreign Policy Roundup: Americans Remain Open to U.S. Commitments Overseas

by James M. Lindsay Friday, May 13, 2016
Boxes of relief items from the U.S. Agency for International Development are seen stacked at Villamor Air Base in Manila, the Philippines.  (Cheryl Ravelo/Reuters) Boxes of relief items from the U.S. Agency for International Development are seen stacked at Villamor Air Base in Manila, the Philippines. (Cheryl Ravelo/Reuters)

What candidates say on the campaign trail matters for how elections turn out. But so too does what the public is thinking. On that score, two things stand out in the Pew Research Center’s recent poll on what Americans think about the U.S. role in the world. Read more »